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THE 



College Forum. 



JANUARY, 1894. 



. f CONTENTS: * . 



Editorials 1 2 

Would Woman be Justified in Refusing 

to Pay Her Taxes ? 2, 3 

Made, Not Bestowed 3-5 

Hon. Chauncey Mitchell Depew's Experi- 
ence g 

Why Join a Literary Society ? . . . . ,6, 7 

Floral Badges for Different People '.7 

Trustee Meeting 7 8 

A Born Lawyer. ...... Q 

Two Professions 8 

The Prodigal Daughter. .......... 8 



College Directory , 9 

Philokosmian Literary Society 9, 10 

Alumni , ,10 

Alumni Banquet. ... 10 

Personals and Locals. 10, 11 

Public Rhetorical 11, 12 

Wedding Bells. 12, 13 

Get Away From the Crowd 13 

Exchanges 13, 14 

A Lesson After School. ......... 14 

Advertisements 14-10 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



HARRY LIGHT, 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

22 EAST MAIN ST., ANNVILLE, PA. 



Our shelves are constantly filled with 
New, Second-Hand and Shelf-Worn 



School t College Text Books, 



o 



w 
o 

< 

S b 3 

psj Together with a Complete Assortment of 



Q 
25 
< 



STATIONERY, 

Wall Paper and Window Shades. 



3 



a wan raper ana winnow mm. 3 

M >< 
i/i 3 

A Selected Stock of the i 

S 7"£5 r 5 TOES a/ 7 /w/>£/? g 

w AND W 

^ DECORATIONS. 

SCHOOL AND COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS A SPECIALTY. 

C- SMITH, 



011TB ^ 

ANNVILLE, PA, 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

COLLEGE UNO SCHOOL SUPPLIES, 

INCLUDING 

NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 

OLD BOOKS. NEW BOOKS. 

Cheapest place in the Lebanon Valley to buy your 
Books. New and Old Books Bought, 

Sold and Exchanged. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY, 

SILVER PLATED WARE, 

Spectacles a Specialty. Fitted ^,T£ Gold 

PERFECT FOCUS AND FIT GUARANTEED. 

ISAAC WOLF, 

s 



ON MARKET ST., AT THE RIVER BKIDQ 

HARRISBURG-, 3? A.. 

CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, ET 




ONE PRICE ONLY . 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
838 CUMBERLAND STREET 



Always sold at the Lowest Cash Prices. All Goo 
Guaranteed to be as represented. Rag and lngr 
Carpets 25 cents per yard up. Floor and Table 
Cloths 25 cents per yard up. 

FRED W. YINGST, on Market St., at 'he Brid§ = 
% 1 

8Cl 

rec 
1 

1 

se< 



BOOKS! BOOKS! BOOKS 



When you need Books or Stationery of any kft, 
correspond wi' h or call on us. By so doing you m 
secure the Best Goods at the most Favorable I'ric* 

Stock always New and Fresh. Assortment Larjf.' 
Prices the Lowest. Whether you intend to buy 28 
or $25.00 worth, it will pay you to call to see us. 1 

Bagster's and Oxford Teachers' Bibles a Spucialt»l 
We carry in stock the publications of the TJ-B 
Publishing House, such as Otterbein HymnaX 
Hymns of the Sanctuary, the Books used in tj 
three years' course of study, S. S. Music Books 

AGKNTS WANTED to sell the best and mo 
popular Lord's Prayer published. Send 75 cents i 
sample copy, worth $2.00. Address plainly 

GRIDER & BROTHER, 

PUBLISHERS OF 



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Photograph Family. Records, Etc., Etc., 

YORK, PA. 

Please Mention "The College Forum." 



CO 



25 



mc 

iss 
Fe 
bei 
bei 



ley 
SCI 

noi 
wil 



Bridg 



THE COLLEGE FOKUM. 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Vol. VII. No. 1. ANNVILLE, PA., JANUARY, 1894. Whole No. 67. 



EDITORS. 



H. CLAY DEANElt, A. M., 
Editor-in-Chief an<l Publisher. 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 
John H. Maysilles, '95. Ira E. Albert, '97. 

George H. Stein, '97. 



EXCHANGE EDITOR. 

D. S. ESHLEMAN, '91. 

ALUM XI EDITOR. 

Prof. John E. Lehman, A. M. 



SOCIETT EDITORS. 

Clionian Societ}'— Miss Estella Stehman, '96. 
Philokosmian Society— Oscar E. Good, '94. 
Kalozetean Society— G. A. L. Kindt, '94. 

THE COLLEGE FORUM will be sent monthly for one 
school year on receipt of twenty-live cents. Subscriptions 
receiTed at any time. 

For terms of advertising, address the Publisher. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as 
second-class mail matter. 



E&ttodal, 



Business men, why not advertise in the 
columns of the College Forum. 



The day of prayer for college on the 
25th inst will be observed with appropri- 
ate exercises. 



We will give a year's subscription to 
the Forum to any one sending us one or 
more copies of any or all of the following 
issues of the College Forum: January, 
February, March, April, August, Septem- 
ber, October, of the vear 1888. The num- 
bers are 1, 2, 3, 4, 8,"-9, 10. 



Students and friends of Lebanon Val- 
tey College, if you do not already sub- 
I scribe for the College Forum, will you 
| not send us your names each accompanied 
" Wlth twenty-five cents for a year's sub- 

7<S ^ 



scription? The success of the Forum 
largely depends upon your support. We 
desire to make each issue better, but to 
do it your financial aid will be necessary. 



The death of William C. Wyand, of 
Keedysville, Md.,- on the 8th inst, has 
caused a deep gloom over all who knew 
him. On Christmas' he had an attack of 
la grippe, which caused a mastoid abscess 
to form at the base of the brain, which re- 
sulted fatally. He attended college in 
1882-83, and was highly esteemed for his 
Christian character, genial disposition and 
obliging nature. 



The great pendulum of time has ticked 
out the old year and has now advanced 
far into 1894. Eighteen ninety-three has 
passed into history with its blessings and 
curses. We stand one year nearer the eter- 
nal shore of time. Our lives have been 
largely what circumstances and we our- 
selves have made them. Eighteen ninety- 
three was a year of progress and advance- 
ment in science and civilization. The Co- 
lumbian Exposition brought together and 
compared the progress of nearly all na- 
tions in one grand display in the centre 
of the North American continent. 

The business world suffered many dis- 
paragements and many failures; thous- 
ands of our workingmen were turned into 
the streets to beg, steal, or starve. We 
had hoped in vain that the crisis would 
be at an end, yet the dawn of the new 
year finds thousands out of work in the 
midst of winter. Our National authori- 
ties must be up and doing; they cannot 
afford to spend time haranguing over 



2 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



questions that should have been settled 
long since, while the Nation looks on 
with anxiety and fear. May we see a great 
change wrought early in the present year. 



The casualties of foot-ball the past sea- 
son have given some alarming result's. 
Eight men have been killed and over one 
hundred maimed for life, besides those 
whose injuries were kept from the public. 
For the number of men engaged, the fa- 
talities were greater than that of an ordi- 
nary war. The sacrifice of Amei'ica's 
noblest sons is too great and appalling. 
It is hoped that the near future will see 
the game so revised that it will be impos- 
sible for players to crush the life out of 
each other or become ph}-sical wrecks for 
life. 



Would Woman be Justified in Refus- 
ing to Pay Her Taxes? 

The discussion of this subject appears 
to be rather " one-sided." And in debate 
we think that the negative side would be 
more argumentative than the affirmative. 
However, this nuvv be, we will endeavor 
to discuss it from both points of view. 

It is upon the claim of " taxation with- 
out representation " that woman bases her 
right of refusal to pay tax. This is her 
chief reason and is one that commands at- 
tention. History's pages have many times 
recorded the disastrous effects of such 
form of government. Not only in other 
countries has this been manifested, but 
also in our own. We refer to the Revo- 
lutionary war, the unsuccessful termina- 
tion of which would likely have placed 
the United States under the more or less 
tyrranic rule of a sovereign. 

But by the perseverance and wise fore- 
thought of the leaders of this memorable 
war success reigned. Liberty was ours, 
and the United States obtained that free- 
dom which stands unrivaled by any civi- 
lized nation of the world. 

All are familiar with the causes of this 
war. How the colonists demanded of 
George III., king of England, that it was 
not just to tax them for their tea, stamps, 
and other articles since they had no voice 
in the English government. 

Does not every true American citizen 



affirm that this claim was lawful? Th 
America was right and her course in de- 
manding representation justifiable? The 
answer comes to us in the affirmative. 

Now, suppose the women of our land 
were to make a demand upon the govern- 
ment to be exempted from taxation, as- 
serting that because they have not the 
right of suffrage they are taxed without 
representation, and, like the original colo- 
nies, demand a voice in the government. 
The first question that would arise would 
be this: Is her claim well founded, as] \ 
was that of America upon England? Let 
us consider this. . 

Woman receives far more privilege and < 
authority from the power to which she 1 
pa} r s her tax than ever America did. 
In the ownership of property she hasj < 
more rights than a man. He cannot deed I 
his property without his wife's signature;! ^ 
while a woman can without her husband's.] 
Her property is guarded and her roadsl 1 
kept up. Her own person is protected.! 1 
The courts usually sentence violence to * 
woman more severely than to man. In all J 
municipal affairs she receives the same at- j 
tention as man, and ofttimes more. Her 
children are educated free in the public 
schools just as those of her brother. All 
trades and professions stand open to re- 
ceive her, very little discrimination being 
made by sex. In fact, she receives the ^ 
same benefits from the government in ^ 
every way as do male citizens. % 

But, you say, she is denied the right of a 
the ballot, and therefore should pay no 1 
tax. Surely this would be a gross injus-J j 
tice to give her all equal rights of citizen-! t 
ship with man except the right of sufl h 
frage, and to receive no compensation in l 
return. We claim that in no wise would o 
it be fair dealing. Man pays for his 
vote. His poll tax must be paid, or he v 
is deprived the privileges of the ballot, s 
Woman is denied the right of voting, v 
hence her tax is lessened, she being 
exempted from paying poll tax. tl 

Thus we see that from the tax she pays o 
the same benefits are derived as thosi * 
from the same amount which a man paysl 11 
There is no doubt but that woman would tl 
pay the additional assessment for thfl lx 
privilege of voting were she given the op*| P 
portunit3 r . But we have considered the ° 
subject upon the basis of our present sysl tl 
tern of government. Many serious consej 11 
quences, we think, would follow the ex- 
emption of woman from paying taa 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



"hat 
cle- 
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and 
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tax. 



Many dishonest men would sign their 
properties to their wives, and thus the 
revenue of the government would be much 
diminished. The tax rate would have to 
be increased on the property of all male 
citizens. This would immediately' cause 
trouble, since the rate is at present enor- 
mous and man} r citizens can scarcely 
meet it. 

But while we do not think she should 
be freed from taxation entirely, yet her 
tax might be lessened from that of man's 
more than the ordinary poll-tax, for that 
is a small stipulation for being denied the 
glorious use of the ballot. A good way 
of settling this tax question, should a con- 
test arise, would be, we think, to grant 
woman the right of suffrage. For by so 
doing we believe that a purer ballot and 
better moral form of government could 
be maintained. 

But to the present sj^stem of taxation 
we have no objections, and do not think 
the refusal of woman to pay the taxes as- 
sessed by the government which fosters 
and guards her would be in any way 
justifiable. 

IS". C. Sleichter, '97. 



Made, Not Bestowed. 

Life is the springtime of eternity — a 
voyage to the grave. Our boat at first 
glides down the narrow channel, through 
the playful murmurings of the little brook 
and the windings of its grassy borders. 
The trees shed their blossoms over our 
young heads; the flowers seem to offer 
themselves to our young hands ; we are 
happy i n hope, and grasp eagerly at the 
beauties around us ; but being borne on, 
ou £joys and griefs are alike behind us. 

Whether rough or smooth, there are 
victories to be won as we glide down the 
stream of life, more glorious than those 
which crimsoned Marathon and Waterloo. 

There are moments in the lives of men 
that are supremely eloquent, and the story 
<« _ those moments history loves to relate. 
Ihese eloquent moments of decision or 
indecision come to each and every one ; to 
pne poor in the shop as well as the wealthy 
th e palace; to the simple-hearted 
peasant m his cottage as well as the king 
fh ^^ rone > to the honest plowman in 
we s held as well as the learned statesman 
m the legislative hall. 

Ihese moments are the indexes to the 
mstory of the individual, as the supreme 



moment of the greatest chieftain is the 
index to the history of a nation. From 
these moments spring the flowers of jus- 
tice, sending abroad the fragrant odors of 
freedom and charitv, or they produce the 
bane of human happiness' These mo- 
ments, like the avalanche, remove the 
rocks and smoothe the rugged slopes, 
from which will spring verdure to make 
beautiful the scene of the mountain soli- 
tude, or will bear a message of death and 
destruction to the woodman's cot or the 
mountain village. 

Listen to history while it tells the story 
of a few decisive moments. 

Behold the little Assembly on the fer- 
tile plains of Old Virginia, and the states- 
men that are gathered there ; but, mark 
you, grim despair is there also; it has 
mastered some; with others it is fiercely 
combating. But there sits young Patrick 
Henry ; 'notice the expression of anxiety 
on his noble brow. How his proud breast 
heaves with fires of patriotic zeall All 
about him is darkness and despair. 

The Assembly is about to adjourn 
without a decision, but the decisive mo- 
ment has come. Patrick Henry arises 
with throbbing heart, while those around 
him sit and look with expectancy. Says 
he : " Mr. President, it is natural for man 
to indulge in the illusions of hope, but 
thers is no longer room for hope. If we 
wish to be free, if we wish to preserve 
those privileges for which we have so long 
. been contending, we must fight. I repeal, 
sir, we must fight. Our chains are forged ; 
the war is inevitable, and let it come. Is 
life so dear or peace so sweet as to be 
purchased at the price of chains and 
slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God!" 
Ah! see those faces responsive with stern 
decision. 

Shall the Assembly adjourn now with- 
out action? Shall they calmly submit to 
the despotic claims of Britain ? Not so, 
the die is cast, and the glad news goes 
forth that America will defend herself with 
all the powers that God has given her. 
Thus it is that freedom dwells in the "land 
of the free and the home of the brave." 

There is another spot in which history 
loves to linger. The field where Europe 
broke asunder the chains which were being 
forged for her Waterloo. Call to your 
minds the events of that fateful day. In 
the morn nature wept and her lavished 
tears moistened the mother earth to which 
many a noble son must return before night. 



4 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Napoleon and his great' army sweep on 
through the engulfing smoke; the battle is 
almost won in his favor ; but the arrival 
of Blucher turns the giant tragedy. Na- 
poleon is beaten, and those majestic col- 
umns of France lie in the gory mire. The 
kings ascended their thrones, the master 
of Europe was put in a cage, and the old 
powers become the new. 

On the bank of a rippling stream, under 
the sunny skies of Italy, is a place where 
decision dwelt in glory. Centuries ago 
the edict went forth from the Roman Sen- 
ate, Caesar lay down your arms. It flew 
to the great conquerer in the mountains 
of the north. He starts to obey and when 
near his native country he stands on the 
banks of the Rubicon, and sees Rome 
slowly but surely dying. 

There was the jealous Pompey on the 
throne, the people burdened and discon- 
tented under misrule. He hesitates ; shall 
he la}- down his arms and become a willing 
prisoner of the vicious Pompey? No, he is 
not willing to submit to the despot, and 
permit Rome to continue her headlong 
course of destruction. 

He marshals his troops, he crosses the 
Rubicon, he purges Rome, he makes him- 
self dictator, he forms new laws, and Rome 
lives on. 

Oh! thou glorious moment when Caesar 
stood, hesitated, decided, on the bank of 
the Rubicon. 

There have been many Rubicons and 
many Caesars have stood upon their 
banks. There will be many Rubicons. 
Will there be the Caesars to cross them ? 

Many men have been great whose heads 
never wore the crown or sat upon the 
throne. They have been obscure in their 
birth, but great in life. They have been 
born in villages, but reigned over cities. 
They were first laid in the mangers of 
poverty, but have become possessors of 
thrones. 

Their fame ascends higher and higher 
Until at last their names and works spread 
over all civilized nations, even compelling 
the wealthy man to bow his knees and 
worship them, as they worship their idols 
of marble and gold. 

Thousands of men become discouraged 
and say, there is the man with his beauti- 
ful home ; here I am with nothing ; there 
is Jay Gould surrounded with riches and 
luxury; here I am in the depth of poverty. 

Milton was an humble scrivener and by 
continual study lost his eyesight ; but in 



a short time was above all English poets, 
stately and grand. 

Daniel Webster while in his youth made 
oft-hand speeches to the forest trees, to 
the cornfield, and very often in some 
distant barn, having for his audience the 
horse and ox. And by this early practice 
his latter days were crowned with success. 

Sir Isaac Newton while a mere lad got 
over into John Locke's apple orchard, saw 
an apple fall, was attracted towards it, 
and that led to the great discovery — not 
of Mr. Newton, but of the great law of 
attraction and gravitation. 

Many of our most promising young 
men waste the best part of their lives in 
fruitless endeavors. They have no trade, 
no profession, no object before them; on 
the contrary they formulate plans which 
they never execute. Like the Republican 
and Democrat, always vote for the wrong 
man. 

Scores of poor deluded mortals are 
striving to preach the gospel, when they 
ought to be " plowing corn " on the hill- 
sides and prairies. Many a brainless man 
parts his hair in the middle; measures 
ribbon behind the counter, doing a girl's 
work ; when he is needed in the harvest 
field and at the business end of a hayfork. 
Every young man should be industrious ; 
have an occupation and choose that which 
is honorable and best adapted to his 
capacities. 

Many of our great men were poor un- 
fortunate orphan boys ; while mere lads 
they made up their minds to take the 
oaks from the forest, the pines from the 
sand, the rocks from the earth, and build 
their mansions. 

They took upon their small shoulders 
great burdens ; met violent circumstances; 
battled with sbarp opposition ; faced the 
storms of labor until they won for them- 
selves great victories and appeared before 
the world in beauty and noble manhood. 
This is the way men are made. 

Let us contrast for a moment the lives 
of Jay Gould and George Washington. 
The former may be compared to the sum- 
mer bird with its pretty nest covered with 
green leaves, surrounded by golden tas- 
sels and the perfume of flowers. But 
when summer is gone we have left the 
howling winds of winter and beauties of 
nature which are buried beneath the snow 
Take this man wrapped in his robes of 
luxuries, living off of the hard earnings of 
others; he sees every day in the streets 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



ts. 



the withered fingers of beggary and the 
white lips of famine, while he is worth his 
millions. Take his means from him and 
what is left — a cancer of the community, 
a leech to the body politic, that deserves 
to be doomed to utter destruction. 

The latter, who was born in an old 
fashioned wooden mansion upon the bank 
of the Potomac, was in his youth too 
manty to tell a lie; but by taking step by 
step, siezing every golden opportunty, he 
became a great man honored by God and 
man. He maintained by peace the inde- 
pendence of his country, and established 
this government which is the foundation 
of the most enlightened nation of the 
world. And to-day there lies under the 
groves of Mt. "Vernon the ashes of a hero, 
statesman and father. And near by stands 
the most magnificent monument that has 
ever been erected in honor of one man, 
towering in the sky as the eagle soars 
from the crags of the Andes. 

Men who were born in the fathomless 
depths of humanity have written works 
that will stand while the world stands. 
They have established liberties which 
make our country the boast of the Britons 
and the envy of the world. They have 
died for liberty; they have died for us 
and made this nation one of the grandest 
that was ever kissed by the lips of liberty. 

J. R. Wallace, '95. 



Hon. Channcey M. Depew's 
Experience. 

The best thing I remember connected 
with myself (and a personal incident is 
always a good one) is, that when I gradu- 
ated from Yale I thought I would lead a 
life of scholastic ease. I thought I would 
read and write a little, take it easy, and 
have a good time. I had a hard-hearted 
old father, of sturdy Holland Dutch an- 
cestry. He had money enough to take 
care of me, and I knew it, and when he 
discovered that I knew it and intended to 
act accordingly, it was a cold day for me, 
and he said to me : " You will never get a 
dollar from me except through my will. 
*rom this time forth you have got to 
make your own way." Well, I found I 
bad a hard lot of it. Nobody had a 
harder one, and the old gentleman stood 
uy and let me fight it out. I bless him 
to-night with all the heart and gratitude I 
nave for that. If he had taken the other 
course, what would I have done ? I would 



have been up in JPeekskill to-night nursing 
a stove, cursing the men who had suc- 
ceeded in the world, and wondering by 
what exceptional luck they had got on. 
But having to dig my way along, I got 
beyond everything my father ever dreamed 
of; but it was done by fourteen hours or 
sixteen or eighteen hours work a day, if 
necessaiy. It is done by temperance, by 
economy. When 3 r ou make a dollar, spend 
seventy-five cents and put the other 
twent3 T -five by. Don't bury savings in a 
stocking or put them in Nickel Plate 
Bonds, but put them in Government bonds 
or in a house and lot. 

****** 

Twenty-five years ago, in Peekskill, I 
knew every man, woman and child in that 
place. I was active in every work in the 
town ; I belonged to the fire company ; I 
made all the speeches on every occasion, 
and especially at the target shoots. I 
have presented more plated-ware from men 
who wanted to be Congressman, County 
officers, members of Assembly, or Justice 
of the Peace, and who contributed them 
as prizes for the annual target shoot, than 
you could count ; and in that way I be- 
came acquainted with almost everbody in 
Peekskill. And it has been a study with 
me to mark boys who started in eveiy 
grade of life with myself, to see what has 
become of them. I was up last fall and 
began to count them over, and it was an 
instructive exhibit. Some of them became 
clerks, merchants, manufacturers, lawyers, 
doctors. It was remarkable that every 
one of those who drank is dead ; not one 
living of my age. Barring a few who 
were taken off b} r sickness, every one who 
proved a wreck and wrecked his family, 
did it from rum and no other cause. Of 
those who were church-going people, who 
were frugal and thrift}', every single one 
of them, without an exception, owns the 
house in which he lives, and has some- 
thing laid b}', the interest on which, with 
his house, would carry him through many 
a rainy day.— B. & 0. Y. M. 0. A. Bulletin.' 



The Christmas number of the Dayton, 
0., High School Times came out under a 
new cover and twice the usual size. It is 
filled with interesting matter and contains 
a large number of engravings, including 
full page cuts of high school buildings of 
1833, 1857, and the new one not yet com- 
pleted, also a full page cut of the principal, 
Capt. C. B. Stivers. \ 



6 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Why Join a Literary Society? 

This is one of the many questions that 
present themselves to every student as 
he or she enters upon the threshold of 
college life. 

As the young man and woman sur- 
round themselves with the atmosphere of 
college life, many decisions must be made 
that will, in all probability, lead to suc- 
cess or failure in certain lines of life 
work. It may not be an easy matter to 
decide which society to join, for each 
offers advantages that the other does not. 
But it is not usually the greatest question 
to decide which to join, but shall I join 
either. 

It may be that the new student hesi- 
tates, looking forward to the first per- 
formance with fear and dread, and to the 
time when, perhaps, he shall stand before 
a society with trembling limbs and quiv- 
ering lips to read his first essay or deliver 
his first oration. 

The thought now presents itself that he 
may either join now or wait awhile, or 
even not join at all. The longer such 
thoughts are cherished the more precious 
time is wasted. Undoubtedly every stu- 
dent should join one of the societies; as 
to which one, he must decide for himself. 
A student cannot afford to loose the influ- 
ence and associations which a society 
offers, meeting, as he does, in a social, as 
well as literary capacity. 

The value of true friendship is more 
fully appreciated ; " ties that bind " are 
formed never to be broken. By friendly 
gatherings and relations you learn to 
study and know when and where to trust 
human nature. 

The world will not judge you so much 
by the sacrifice of time and money spent 
in college, nor by your ability to demon- 
state a problem in mathematics, nor by 
your knowledge of the studies you pur- 
sued, nor by your grades at the end of the 
term, for the world will know very little 
of these, but it will judge you to a very 
great degree by your ability to present 
your ideas in public logically and to the 
point, ofttimes, it may be, at a moment's 
warning. The fact that you have passed 
through college will cause you to be called 
upon often to assist at public gatherings, 
for, indeed, the idea is too prevalent 
among non-college educated people that a 
student is at college to prepare a lot of 
fine speeches. 

College life brings with it very great 



responsibilities in the way of claims of the 
public, and repeated refusal to take part 
in public discussions will bring upon you 
severe and just criticism. 

Again, you should join a society be- 
cause it will develop you along the lines 
of personality and individuality. As an 
intelligent being you should not be satis- 
fied to follow your fellow-men ignorantly 
as an ox to the slaughter, but because, 
after careful investigation, you find their 
course of action to be right. In public 
life you may be called upon to decide im- 
portant questions that present themselves, 
questions of rules of order, questions on 
constitution and by-laws, questions of the 
justice of a decision by the chair ; on such 
questions every one should have an intel- 
ligent opinion, an opinion to stand by 
until shown to be wrong. 

No member should be afraid to express 
his opinion on matters of the proceedings 
of a society, but assert his rights and not 
be satisfied to occupy his chair in ignor- 
ance. Every member should have the 
privilege of free expression on all pro- 
ceedings of the society. You should be 
a wide awake, live member, one on whom 
the society can depend, and of whom it 
can justly be proud. 

The advantages must of course be im- 
proved, and can never be enjoyed and rea 
lized without some hard labor. When 
placed on duty begin at once to make in 
vestigation and preparation, and do not 
wait until the last day and then have to 
neglect everything else or go to society 
half prepared, for if you are careless about 
your part of the programme others will 
too often be so too. You cannot afford 
to contract a careless habit in this line of 
work* which may cause you to go maimed 
through all your literaiy work. Get into 
the channel of active, earnest literary work 
aud thus inspire others as well as yourself] 
learn to impart your knowledge to others 
with grace and ease which will impress i1 
upon them more forcibly. Doubtless yo« 
will worry and fret over your fisst per- 
formance, but what does it matter if your 
knees do grow weak, your lips quiver, and 
your eyes grow dim as you attempt to 
read your first essay. We are all human ; 
others have overcome the same seeming 
insurmountable difficulties. Do not allo^ 
your timidity to conquer and destroy your 
usefulness. Remember you are among 
your best friends while in society, those 
who have traveled the same road and wil' 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 1 



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sympathize with you in your first efforts. 
The criticisms will be given in a kindly 
spirit, not such as the world will give 
when you have to appear before the public. 
As there are many among us who do not 
yet belong to a society, let me urge every 
student to become a member of one of our 
literary societies and thereby add much 
pleasure and profit to your college life 
that you would otherwise miss. 

J. H. Maysilles, '95. 



Floral Badges For Different People. 

An ingenious person has been ponder- 
ing the subject of floral badges, and makes 
these suggestions, to which we add others 
of our own to carry out the idea : 

For the first lord of admiralty, docks ; 
for a doctor, cyclamen and self heal, for 
an oculist, eyebright and iris ; for a tailor, 
Dutchman's breeches ; for a broker, stocks 
and bulrush ; for a philosopher, sage ; for 
a cook, butter and eggs ; for a land agent, 
groundsel ; for a butcher, lambkill ; for a 
policeman, beet; for a shepherd, phlox; 
for a musician, thyme ; for an acrobat, 
capers ; for a jockey, speedwell ; for a 
woodcutter, hardhack; for a newspaper 
humorist, chestnut; for a shoemaker, 
lady's slipper ; for an honest man, lilac; 
and for a rogue, hemp. — Exchange 



Trustee Meeting. 

In accordance with previous notice the 
Board of Trustees of the College met in 
special session on Wednesday afternoon, 
January 10th, at 2 o'clock. D. W. Crider, 
Esq., occupied the chair and Dr. Isaac H. 
Albright acted as secretary. The follow- 
ing members were present": D. W. Crider, 
H. H. Kreider, Win. H. Uhler, N. B. 
Light, A. H. Rice, Reno S. Harp, I. H. 
Albright, S. W. Clippinger, Adam R. 
Forney, Isaac B. Haak, Cyrus F. Flook, 
John B. Stehman, A. S. Riland, Wm. H. 
Ulrich, E. Benj. Bierman, H. Clay Deaner, 
John E. Lehman, J. A. McDermad and 
John A. Shott. Bishop E. B. Kephart, 
M. J. Mumma and C. J. Kephart, who 
were present by invitation, were made ad- 
visory members. 

Prayer was offered by Rev. M. J. 
Mumma. President Bierman was then 
called upon to state the object of the 
meeting, which he did by giving a full 
and very satisfactory statement of the 
nnancial condition of the institution, 



dwelling more particularly on the impor- 
tance of taking immediate steps to inaug- 
urate a plan upon which the recently ap- 
pointed agent, Mr. Mumma, can concen- 
trate his efforts. The need of more fully 
equipping the College in its various de- 
partments was also discussed at consider- 
able length. 

He was followed by Rev. M. J. Mumma 
in an earnest address on the work of the 
agent and the need of a united support on 
the part of all friends of the College to 
make his mission a success. He declared 
he was well received everywhere, and re- 
ported favorable responses from many of 
his clerical brethren to a circular letter 
recently sent out. 

Bishop Kephart then came forward and 
delivered a forcible and eloquent address 
on the need of a first-class College here in 
the East to make all our church work a 
success, and said that he had not the least 
doubt in his mind about the ability, finan- 
cial and otherwise, of the members of the 
co-operating conferences to make Leba- 
non Valley College all that could be de- 
sired. 

Dr. Albright spoke of his attachment 
to the College, of his willingness to make 
any sacrifice necessary to build up the 
institution, and marked out a policy, 
which if followed by our trustees and 
friends, will make the institution a success. 

A general discussion then followed in 
which Messrs. Ulrich, Clippinger, Rice, 
Forney, Stehman, Kreider, Riland, Flook 
and others participated. 

At the evening session, Reno S. Harp, 
Esq., read a paper on the " Revision of 
the College Curriculum," and Prof. John 
A. Shott on " The Needs of the Scientific 
Department of the College." After some 
discussion, these papers were referred to 
appropriate committees. 

FRIDAY MORNING. 

The session was opened with prayer by 
Mr. S. W. Clippinger. At this meeting 
it was almost unanimously agreed that the 
best plan proposed to aid the College in 
the liquidation of its debt, is that of 
President Bierman submitted last June a 
year ago, namely, that of making an ap- 
peal to our church members, congrega- 
tions, Sunday-schools and Young People's 
Societies to aid in raising the sum of- 
twenty-five thousand ($25,000) dollars, in 
one thousand shares of twenty-five dollars 
each, and the agent was instructed to in- 
augurate methods to work on this plan. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Bishop Kepbart, President Bierman, 
Dr. Albright and Rev. M. J. Mumma 
were appointed a committee to prepare 
an appeal for general circulation to the 
Young People's Societies in the congre- 
gations of our co-operating conferences to 
aid our pastors on " College Day." 

Plans were also matured to advertise 
the advantages offered by the College, 
more extensively, and President Bierman, 
Rev. C. J. Kephart and Prof. J. E. Leh- 
man were appointed a committee to carry 
them into effect. 

A resolution was also adopted which 
euthorizes the authorities of the College 
to offer a free scholarship to any one per- 
son of every count}'- in the States of our 
co-operating territory who makes the best 
examination for admission to our Fresh- 
man class. 

The selection of Rev. M. J. Mumma as 
general agent of the College was approved, 
and he was unanimously elected to the 
position at a salary of six hundred ($600) 
dollars a year, and necessary traveling 
expenses. 

An unusual degree of enthusiasm was 
manifested by all who were in attendance, 
and no doubt good results will follow this 
important gathering. 



A Born Lawyer. 

A lawyer advertised for a clerk. The 
next morning the office was crowded with 
applicants — all bright, and many suitable. • 
He bade them wait until all should arrive, 
and then arranged them in a row and said 
he would tell them a story, note their 
comments, and judge from that whom he 
would choose. 

"A certain farmer," began the lawyer, 
" was troubled with a red squirrel that got 
in through a hole in his barn and stole his 
seed corn. He resolved to kill the squir- 
rel at the first opportunity. Seeing him 
go in at the hole one noon, he took his 
shotgun and fired away ; the first shot set 
the barn on fire." 

" Did the barn burn ?" said one of the 
boys. 

The lawyer, without answer, continued : 
" And seeing the barn on fire, the farmer 
seized a pail of water and ran to put it 
out." 

# " Did he put it out?" said another. 

"As he passed inside, the door shut to 
and the barn was soon in flames. When 
the hired girl rushed out with more 
water " — 



" Did they all burn up ?" said another 
boy. 

The lawyer went on without answer 
" Then the old lady came out, and all was 
noise and confusion, and everybody was 
trying to put out the fire." 

" Did any one burn up ?" said another. 

The lawyer said : " There that will do 
you have all shown great interest in the 
story." But observing one little bright- 
e} T ed fellow in deep silence, he said: 
"Now, my little man, what have you to 
say ? " 

The little fellow blushed, grew uneasy 
and stammered out : 

" I want to know what became of th 
squirrel; that's what I want to know." 

"You'll do," said the lawyer; "you 
my man ; you have not been switched ofi 
by a confusion and a barn burning, and 
the hired girls and water pails. You have 
kept your eye on the squirrel." — Tact in 
Court. 



aie 



Two Professions. 

HE. 

"You ne'er can object to my arm round your 
waist, 

And the reason you'll readily guess ; 
I'm an editor, dear, and I always insist 
On the ' liberty of the press.' " 

SHE. 

"I'm a minister's daughter, believing in texts. 
And I think all the newspapers bad ; 

And I'd make you remove your arm, were it not 
Tou were making the waist places glad." 

G. E. Throop, in Life. 



The Prodigal Daughter. 

To the home of his father returning, 

The prodigal weary and morn, 
Is greeted with joy and thanksgiving, 

As when on his first natal morn. 
A robe and a ring are his portion, 

The servants as suppliants bow. 
He is clad in fine linen and purple 

In return from his penitent vow. 

But, oh! for the prodigal daughter, 

Who has wondered away from her home. 
Her feet must still press the dark valley, 

And through the wild wilderness roam. 
Alone on the bleak barren mountain, 

The mountain so dreary and cold, 
No hand is outstretched in fond pity 

To welcome her back to the fold. 

But thanks to the shephard whose mercy] 

Still follows his sheep though they stray 
The weakest, and e'en the forsaken, 

He bears in his bosom alway, 
And in the bright mansions of glory, 

Which the blood of the sacrifice won, ' 
There is room for the prodigal daughter 

As well as the prodigal son. 



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THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



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College Directory. 
Faculty. 

E. BENJ. BIERMAN, A. M., Ph. D., 

PRESIDENT, 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 
H. CLAY DEANER, A. M., 
Professor of the Latin Language. 
JOHN E. LEHMAN, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 
Rev. JNO. A. McDERmAd, A. M., 
Professor of the Greek Language. 
JOHN A. SHOTT, Ph. B., 
Professor of Natural Science. 

MARY E. SLEICHTER, A. B., 
Professor of English Literature. 

CARRIE M. FLINT, 
Professor of Instrumental Music. 
GERTRUDE ALBERTSON, 
Professor of Harmony and Fine Art. 
HARVEY D. MILLER, B. S., 
Teacher of the Violin. 

Literary Societies. 

CLIONIAN. 
Miss ANNA E. WILSON, President. 
Miss ELLA PENNYPACKER, Secretary. 

KALOZETEAN. 
SHERIDAN GARMAN, President. 
GEO. A. L. KINDT, Secretary. 

PHILOKOSMIAN. 
SAMUEL F. HUBER, President. 
WILLIAM BEATTIE, Secretary. 

r. m. a a. 

GEO. K. HARTMAN, President. 

HARRY W. MAYER, Secretary. 
Y. W. C. A. 
Miss MAGGIE STRICKLER, President. 
Miss ESTELLA STEHMAN, Secretary. 



Philokosmian Literary Society. 

Esse Quam Videri. 



As we enter upon the work of a new 
year, it is proper for us to look back over 
the work of the year that has passed, 
y And, as we do so, we feel to congratulate 
ourselves upon the success which has at- 
mercy tende(1 our efforts during the year. We 
;y stray fught have done better, it is true. Rarely 
h indeed does man accomplish all that it 
would be possible for him to accomplish 
were he to apply himself to his work with 
ai l the zeal and the energy that he could 
command. Nevertheless we feel that we 



7i 

won, 
ghter 



have accomplished a good work. As a 
society we have succeeded in arousing an 
active interest in our work on the part of 
the individual members with very few ex- 
ceptions. 

Interest in the musical part of our pro- 
grammes, for a considerable length of 
time, had been suffered to decline; but 
during last term we received additional 
musical talent in some of our new access- 
sions and interest in this department has 
been revived. 

While we did occasionally set aside our 
regular order of exercises for an evening's 
amusement, and notwithstanding the fact 
that toward the close of the year our at- 
tention was frequently turned in the direc- 
tion of other duties, and that our societ}' 
work was somewhat neglected in conse- 
quence, yet our literary exercises have 
been excellent. 

The members have taken pains to pre- 
pare productions which would be credit- 
able to themselves as well as to the society. 
Thus one stimulated the other, and this 
generous rivalry among the members has 
been productive of good results. Never- 
theless, there is ample room for improve- 
ment, and there is no better time than the 
opening of the new year, not only to make 
new resolutions, but to carry them out as 
well, and thus we may be able to make 
still greater advancement during the com- 
ing 3'ear. Some new lines of work are at 
present under consideration, and some 
changes will likely be make wich will 
render our work more effective in accom- 
plishing the result of preparing ourselves 
for the duties of practical life. The regu- 
lar literary programme was not rendered 
at our first meeting for this term by reason 
of the fact that most of the performers for 
that evening were not prepared as they 
would liked to have been. 

Our brief vacation caused some to be 
slightly tardy in returning, and the duties 
devolving upon them at the opening of 
the term rendered proper preparation 
practically impossible. 

We believe that one production well 
prepared is more beneficial to the per- 
former and more instructive to his hearers 
than a greater number of productions 
rendered without proper attention having 
been given them. 

Among our visitors during the past 
month we are pleased to name one of our 
ex-members, S. H. Stein. Mr. Stein gave 
us a spirited talk, in which he extolled the 



10 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



past history of the society and urged 
upon the members the importance of vig- 
orous effort to carry forward the work in 
which we are engaged. 

Others who visited us are Messrs. 
Zerbe, Sleichter and Henry. 

G. K. Hartman is still on the sick list, 
and may not be able to return to school 
for some weeks. 



Alumni. 

"72, Rev. John H. Graybeill has taken 
charge of a Presbyterian congregation at 
St. Mary's, Elk county, this Stste. 

'78, Rev. H. B. Dohner is making ar- 
rangements to leave for Palestine and the 
Holy Land at an early day. 

'89, Rev. Joseph Dougherty was recently 
married to Miss Rebecca Prowell, at the 
bride's home, near Yocumtown, this State. 

'91, Rev. Grant Shaeffer, of Pottsville, 
Pa., made us a pleasant New Year's call. 
He has just completed a beautiful and 
substantial chapel on his mission, which 
will be dedicated the 28 inst. by Bishop 
Weaver. 

'92, A. Raymond Kreider, who is pur- 
suing the electrical course of Cornell Uni- 
versity, is at home convalescing from a 
severe attack of cramp. 

'92, Miss Laura Reider, of Hummels- 
town, Pa., was married to Mr. Frank T, 
Math, of the same place, on December 13, 
1893. The Forum wishes them a long and 
blissful life. 



Alunini Banquet. 

The alumni banquet on Thursday even- 
ing, December 28th, at the Commonwealth 
Hotel, Harrisburg, was voted a success 
by everybody that was present. Among 
the invited guests were D. W. Crider, of 
York, H. H. Kreider, Annville, Wm. H. 
TJlrich, Hummelstown, J. X. Quigley, 
Harrisburg, and others. A reception was 
held in the adjoining parlors from 1 to 8 
o'clock, and the young men and women, 
middle-aged and gray-haired men, mingled 
freely and exchanged college reminiscen- 
ces of by-gone days. 

After everybody had become acquainted 
with everybody else, the members and 
guests formed a line and marched to the 
banquet hall, President Bierman leading 
arm in arm with D. W. Crider, of York, 
Pa. The large banquet room was attract- 
ively decorated. 



Before the members and guests were 
seated, Rev. W. H. Washinger, Chairman 
of the Committee of Arrangements, de- 
livered a brief address of welcome. After 
an invocation by Dr. Albright, an elegant 
menu was discussed for more than an 
hour, when Rev. Mr. Washinger, who 
acted as toastmaster, in a very appro- 
priate and facetious manner, introduced 
the following gentlemen, and responses 
were made on : " Our Alma Mater," by A. 
H. Gerberich, Principal of the Williams- 
town Public Schools. " The Sunny Side 
of College Life," by Prof. John E". Leb, 
man, of the College. " The Alumni of 
L. Y. C.," by Dr. I. H. Albright, of York, 
Pa.; " The Board of Trustees," by D. W. 
Crider, Esq., of York, Pa. Impromptu 
addresses were also made by Dr. Bierman, 
President of the College, Reno S. Harp 
Esq., editor of the Frederick (Md.) Ex- 
aminer; Prof. William H. Kindt, Prin- 
cipal of the Middletown High School, and 
the Rev. C. W. Hutzler, of Harrisburg. 

Previous to the banquet a short busi- 
ness meeting was held, and Lebanon, Pa., 
was selected as the place for the next 
annual banquet. S. P. Light, Esq.. and] 
Chas. E. Rauch, of Lebanon, and . Prof.] 
J. E. Lehman, of Annville, were appointed 
a committee of arrangements. 



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Personals and Locals. 

Messrs. Charles Meister, of Baltimore, 
Md., and Robert Taggart,of Gordonville, 
Pa., both former students, called on friends 
in town on the 13th and 14th inst. 

Mrs. Bierman has been elected presi- 
dent of the Y. P. C. U. at its recent eleo 
tion. 

At the special meeting of the Board o( 
Trustees, the Maryland conference wa« 
represented by Messrs. R. L. Harp and G 
F. Flook. 

W. H. Kreider, '94, attended the mar- 
riage of Miss Sadie V. Steam to Mr. John gi-, 
H. Urner, of Baltimore, Md., on the 1 1th p a 
inst., in the First United Brethren Churcbj Fc 
Chambersburg, Pa. to 

Bishop Kephart preached in our church an< 
on Friday evening, the 12th inst. * 01 

The Columbia Desk Calendar, issued cl ° 
by the Pope Manufacturing Company, for Wl 
1894 is herein acknowledged. It is a pad 
mounted on a stand, having a leaf for eac& for 
day. Upon each leaf besides the date i f ^ 
a pen drawing with interesting inform* 22 - 



II 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



11 



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tion about the Columbia Bicycle and set- 
ting forth the importance of good roads. 

The lecture, u World Making," by Sam- 
uel Phelps Leland on the 17th inst was 
full of thought, and highly interesting. 
For two hours and a half he showed how 
God shaped the world and prepared it 
for man's abode. Some of the views given 
as to the final dissolution of the world 
were slightly erratic. 

To any one receiving a sample copy of 
the Forum, let it be an urgent invitation 
to subscribe. The price is 25 cents per 
year. We would say that we do not get 
a single exchange that will compare with 
the Forum that has not a subscription 
price of fifty cents or more. 

The monotonous silence of the boys was 
disturbed on Saturday evening, the 6th 
inst., by the wild cry of "fire" in town. 
It was found to be at the home of Rev. 
Lewars on Main street. It was caused by 
lighted candles on the Christmas tree. It 
was extinguished before much damage 
was done. 

Miss Naomi E. Mohn, one of our former 
students, spent several days with us last 
week on her way to her home in Reading. 
She has just returned from an extended 
trip to the West. 

We are glad to see a number of new 
students with us this term. 

Our Y. M. C. A. attendance has been 
larger this year than usual. Yet, judging 
from those who attend, some seem to 
think that the meetings are for members 
only. All young men, and especially the 
students, are requested to attend. Meet- 
ings begin promptly at the ringing of the 
bell every Saturday evening. Let us urge 
that more of the students become mem- 
bers. 

Students and friends, patronize those 
who advertise in our columns. It will be 
to your advantage. 

Where are our poets who occasionally 
give vent to their feelings in the Society 
papers ? We invite contributions for the 
I^orum. A standing invitation is given 
to all students, members of the Faculty, 
and friends of the College, to write articles 
for the Forum from time to time. Please 
don't let us have to insist upon your 
writing something occasionally. 

The beginning Greek class is the largest 
Jor several years; it numbers 12. The 
beginning Latin class last term numbered 




The trial of exempting those students 
from examinations who have made a term 
grade of 90 per cent, has proven to be a 
success, and will doubtless continue to be 
in effect. The class work was consider- 
ably better last term, which we think can 
be attributed largely to this. 

Subscribe for the College Forum. 

Owing to the illness of several of the 
contestants and dissatisfaction of others, 
the Prohibition Club at a recent meeting 
decided not to have the oratorical contest. 
Mr. S. F. Huber, '94, was elected to repre- 
sent the Club at the State contest, Febru- 
ary 22. 

Harry Boyer assisted in laying the 
corner-stone of the Evangelical church at 
Royersford on Sunday the 7th inst., and 
in the evening preached at Pottstown, Pa. 

D. S. Eshleman, '94, filled the pulpit of 
the TJ. B. church at Meyerstown on Sun- 
day the Tth inst. 

Prof. Shott has organized a class in 
qualitative anarysis. Th s is the first 
class of the kind organized at the College, 
and is an evidence of the progressive 
nature of the professor of the department. 
The laboratory will be furnished with 
additional chemical apparatus. 



Public Rhetorical. 

A large and appreciative audience 
greeted the Freshman Class on their first 
appearance on the rostrum on the evening 
of January 13. The excellent program, 
the way in which it was executed, the 
intense enthusiasm and interest mani- 
fested, indicates that the Freshman Class 
is composed of good material, and that 
they know Iioav to manage a public rhe- 
torical. 

Besides the interesting literary pro- 
gram there was rendered by the musical 
department some very choice music, so 
that the evening was delightfully spent, 
and the large audience went away, saying 
that this was one of the best publics of 
the year. 

The following program was rendered : 

GENERAL THEME— THE PRESS. 

Piano Solo— "On Blooming Meadows," (Julie Mve- 
Klng), Miss Pennypacker. 

Invocation President E. B. Bierman. 

Quintette—" The Little Bird " (Soederberg), 

.Misses Wilson, Pennypacker, Bowman, For- 
tenbaugh and Gingrich. 

Oration— "Tlie Great Newspapers of Our Country," 

Charles B. Wingerd. 

Oration— " The Newspaper as an Educator," 

Mary E. Richard. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Vocal Solo— "A Winter Lullaby" (li. cle Koven), 

Miss Gingrich. 
Oration— " The Newspaper Reporter," 

Blanche Kephart. 
Discussion — "Resolved, That the Press exerts a 
greater influence than the Pulpit," 
Affirmative, Edwin Kreider. Negative, Edwin 
K. Rudy. 

Male Quartette—" My Love's Own " (Hartsough), 
Messrs. Eshleman, Beattie, Good and Huber. 

Oration— "The Press in Politics," ....Geo. H. Stein. 

Oration— " Sunday Newspapers," Ira E. Albert. 

Chorus— " Wanderer's Night Song" (Rubinstein), 
Misses Wilson, Pennypacker, Stehman, Gin- 
grich, Fortenbaugh and Bowman. 

Mr. Wingerd spoke in a very eloquent 
way of the rise and growth of the great 
newspapers of the country, of the im- 
mense power they are wielding to-ch^y. 
He then named and briefly described a 
number of our leading papers. Mr. Win- 
gerd 's production showed careful prepar- 
ation, and was well delivered. He pos- 
sesses the elements of the orator. 

" The Newspaper as an Educator," an 
oration, by Miss Richard was very well 
received. The composition was excellent, 
and the manner of delivering it was ad- 
mired by all. Miss Richard is composed, 
easy and graceful in her movements on 
the stage.. She said the newspaper is the 
great American schoolmaster, most per- 
sons are indebted to it for the only post- 
graduate course they ever receive. Its 
course covers science, current history, 
politics, religion and almost every phase 
of human thought. The newspaper re- 
porter was discussed in a very interesting 
manner by Miss Blanche Kephart. The 
newspaper is to furnish news; some one 
must gather this news, hence we have the 
reporter. The several kinds of reporters 
were considered, our obligations to the 
reporter. We should not criticise him too 
severely. 

The discussion that followed was inter- 
esting. Mr. Kreider maintained that the 
press exerts the greater influence because 
it reaches by far the greater number of 
people. It is the most powerful factor in 
molding and shaping public opinion on 
any question. Mr. Rudy asserted that 
the pulpit exerts the greater influence be- 
cause the minister is the representative of 
God himself, and prepares the consciences 
and hearts of men so that the influence of 
the press can reach them at all. 

Mr. Stein, on "The Press in Politics," 
delivered an elequent oration, showing 
that the press was a most potent factor in 
shaping the politics of England even a 
century or more ago, and is to-day exert- 
ing a powerful influence. He traced care- 
fully and logically the work of the press 



in the politics of our own country dur- 
ing the last one hundred years, criticising 
the methods of our partisan papers :uul 
advocating more independence on the part! 
of our great journals on political questions.! 
Mr. Stein's delivery is forcible. 

The Sunday newspaper received a severe 
blow at the hands of Mr. Albert. The 
Sabbath is a divine institution, and is 
given for man's benefit; one day in seven 
should be given to rest. Seven editions 
of a daily paper in one week require seven 
days' work; several hundred thousand edj 
itors, printers and newsboj^s must violate 
the Sabbath on acceunt of Sunday papers 
The people demand the Sunday paper, but 
the newspaper itself creates the demand, 
and so is the chief sinner. Mr. Albert 
spoke clearly and forcibly. 

In regard to the music it would be di 
cult to specify when all was so good. 
The Quintette was heartily applauded, 
and the male quartette was encored. 
Taken all in all the Freshman Rhetorical 
w r as a decided success. 



as 
of 
wi 
ck 
arl 

ric 

coi 

lef 

R. 

Pli 
t 

tio 
ha] 



Wedding Bells. 

The residence of Mr. and Mrs. John W. 
Prowell, near Yocumtown, York County, 
Pa., was the scene of a pleasing social 
event on Tuesday morning, Dec. 26, 1893J 
It was the occasion of the marriage of 
their daughter, Rebecca, to the Rev. Jo 
seph Dougherty, of the class of '89 ofl 
Lebanon Yalley College, and now sta- 
tioned at New Cumberland, Pa. 

At an early hour the guests began to 
assemble until upwards of a hundred werej 
present. At precisely 11 o'clock, while the! 
Mendelssohn Wedding March was being 
skillfully executed by Miss Susie Fisher,: 
organist of Salem U. B. Church, the bridal/ 
party, preceded by the ushers, Messrs.1 
Joseph Prowell and John Willetts, enj 
tered the parlor, where the ceremony wasi 
performed by the Rev. Benjamin F.; 
Dougherty, A. M., twin-brother of the 
groom and pastor of the Fifth U. B. 
Church, of Baltimore, Mcl. He was a* 
sisted bv the Rev. Isaac II. Albright, A 
M., Ph. D., of York, Pa. 

The groom was supported by Rev. P 
S. Eshleman, '94 L. Y. C, and the bride^ 
who was very becomingly attired in 
golden-brown costume, by her sister, Mis s 
Hettie Prowell. After congratulations 
the bridal party and guests sat down to 
tables groaning beneath the weight o 



on 

res 
*} 

dai 
hoi 
gro 
I 

Me 
foil 
Mr; 
sist 
I 

par 
wer 
Say 
Mis 
niec 
of ] 
flo^v 
sisti 
ofi 
gro< 
und 
ceiv 
forn 
ful ; 
forn 
serv 

T] 
whit 
lilies 
pear 
blac 
■ A: 
nurn 
dinn 

Tl 
train 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



13 



dufi 
•ising 
i and 
3 part 
tions. 

everl 
The 
nd is 
seven 
i tions 
seven 
ad eel- 
iolate 
aperJ 
jr, but 
m and 
\lbert 

ediffl- 
good 
mded 
cored, 
;orical 



hn W. 

Duntjv 
social 
, 1893.; 
ige of! 
v. Jo} 
'89 of 
w sta-l 

gran to 
d were 
die the] 

being 
fisher, 

bridal 
dessrs. 
ts, en-j 
i v was 
rin F. 
of the 

U. I 
vas as- 
ght, A, 

lev. D- 
i bride, 
i in »! 
sr, Miss? 
lations,j 
own to| 
ight o\ 



good things heaped upon them, and it is 
needless to say that justice was done them 
by all. 

The presents were numerous and useful 
as well as handsome and costly, consisting 
of silver, glass and china ware, together 
with three handsome parlor lamps, a fine 
clock, table spreads, and many other fine 
articles. 

At 1:30 o'clock, p. m., amid a shower of 
rice, shoes, and good wishes, the happy 
couple started for Harrisburg, where they 
left on the 4:20 o'clock train on the P. R. 
R. to spend their honeymoon at Manheim, 
Philadelphia and New York. 

The College Forum sends congratula- 
tions and wishes a them prosperous and 
happy voyage over life's tempestuous sea. 



BODENHORN— SAYLOR. 

A beautiful home wedding took place 
on Thursday morning, January 18, at the 
residence of Mr. Jno L. Savior, of town. 

The occasion was the marriage of his 
daughter Sallie J. to Mr. E. E. Boden- 
horn, book-keeper in Thos. J. Finney's 
grocery store at Harrisburg, Pa. 

Promptly at 10:30 the sweet strains of 
Mendelssohn's wedding march pealed 
forth from the piano, which was played by 
Mrs. Harry Kinports, of New York City, 
sister of the bride. 

The bridal party entered the spacious 
parlor in the following order. The ushers 
were Messrs W. H. Kreider and Jno. B. 
Saylor, of Annville, Pa., followed by 
Misses Miriam Saylor, of Annville, Pa., 
niece of the bride, and Edith Bodenhorn, 
of Hamburg, Pa., niece of the groom as 
flower girls. The bridesmaid Miss Mabel, 
sister of the bride, and Mr. J. Frank Lane, 
of Altoona, as groomsman. The bride and 
groom followed and took their position 
under white doves, where thev were re- 
ceived by Dr. J. E. Hiester, of the Re- 
formed church, who performed the beauti- 
ful and impressive ceremony of the Re- 
formed church by the use of the ring 
service. 

The bride was handsomely attired in 
"white silk, low neck entraine and carried 
lilies of the valley. Her ornaments were 
pearls. The groom wore conventional 
black. 

After receiving the congratulations of 
numerous friends a sumptuous wedding 
dinner was served. 

The bride and groom left on the 2:32 
train for their home in Harrisburg, Pa., 



where they have a handsomely furnished 
home on Third street. They departed 
amid showers of rice and congratulations. 

The bride was a former student of the 
College and a member of the class of '94. 
She is an accomplished and beautiful lady, 
while the groom is an enterprising young 
man, both having hosts of friends who wish 
them success in their vo} r age through life. 
The bride was the recipient of many 
handsome and costty presents. 



Get Away From the Crowd. 

The advice which Robert Burdette gives 
to boys may be well taken, not only by 
them, but by older persons — " Get away 
from the crowd," he says, " for a little 
while every day, and think. Stand on one 
side and let the world run by, while you 
get acquainted with yourself, and see 
what kind of a fellow you are. Ask your- 
self hard questions about yourself; find 
out all you can about yourself. Ascer- 
tain, from original sources, if you are 
really the manner of man you say you 
are ; and if you are always honest ; if you 
always tell the square, perfect truth in 
business deals, if j-our life is good and 
upright at 11 o'clock at night as it is at 
noon ; if you are as good a temperance 
man on a fishing excursion as you are at 
a Suncla}^-school picnic ; if 3^011 are as 
good when you go out of the cit} r as } t ou 
are at home ; if, in short, you are realty 
the sort of a man your father hopes 3^011 
are, and your sweetheart believes you are. 
Get on intimate terms with yourself, my 
boy, and believe me, every time 3 r ou come 
out from one of these private interviews, 
you will be a stronger, better, purer man. 
Don't forget this and it will do you good. 

— Selected. 



Exchanges. 

A large number of our exchanges have 
failed to reach us for several months. 

CoMege journals and others not alread3 r 
exchanging with us and receiving a copy 
of the College Forum will please consider 
this an invitation to exchange. 

The Otterbein Aegis came to us last 
month with a fine cut of the Otterbein 
football team, on which we were well 
pleased to see one of our former students. 
Geo. D. Neecbv. He has made an excellent 
record as a football player as well as in 
his regular college work. 



14 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



We clip the following from the Lowell 
High School Times, which may be a hint 
to some of our subscribers : 

"Lives of poor men oft remind us 
Honest men don't stand a chance ; 

The more we work, there grow behind us 
Bigger patches on our pants. 

"On our pants, once new and glossy, 
Now are stripes of different hue, 

All because subscribers linger 
And won't pay us what is due. 

"Let us then be up and doing, 
Bring your mite, however small, 

Or when the snow of winter strikes us 
We shall have no pants at all." 

" Talk about sympathy for the 117,000 
human souls unemployed in Chicago and 
thousands elsewhere that are suffering ! 
Sympathy removes no suffering ; what we 
want is action on the part of those in au- 
thority. — Frederick County Snide. 

Among our recent exchanges we note 
The Council Work, a journal published 
at York, Pa., in the interests of the 
Junior Order of United American Me- 
chanics, and dedicated to " Virtue, Liberty 
and Patriotism." We are personally ac- 
quainted with its editor, Mr. C. A. Lutz, 
who is quite a young man, but a staunch 
advocate of the Free Public School System 
that should stand by the American flag 
and the open Bible. 

The Christmas number of The Student' 's 
Fen came to us in a beautiful white cover 
printed in gold and lavender, the colors 
qf the society by which it is published. 
It is full of interesting matter, including 
some first class poetry. 

Several excellent Christmas stories ap- 
pear in the December number of the Lynn 
High School Gazette. 

A Lesson After School. 

Alice, aged ten, came home from school 
with an exceedingly damp aspect, and 
dissolved into tears on entering the room. 

" What is the matter, my dear ?" 

" I was pro-pro-o-moted ; and the 
teacher's awful cross ! She expects me 
to know things when I do-on 't-t know'em." 

" Promoted ! Why, how nice ! You 
didn't expect to be I" 

" It isn't nice at all, mamma. And she's 
beginning to tell us about adjectives and 
verbs and things. And it's horrid ! It's 
too hard! I don't like such hard lessons. 
If I was only as big as you, I'd never 
have to learn any, Oh, dear ! Oh, dear! 
I don't see why we must learn such hard 
things !" 



" But the lessons I learn are a great 
deal harder, dear. If you had to learn 
my lessons, what would you do ? " 

" You don't learn any lessons," said 
Alice, laughing through her tears. Paul 
looked up from his book and Nellie from 
her crocheting and joined in the laugh. 

" I don't? Well, you are mistaken, all 
of you. I am older, and so my lessons 
are harder than yours, of course. They 
are not about adjectives or verbs, it is 
true ; but I don't like them any better on 
that account, and I very often make as 
much fuss about the learning as you do." 

Nellie's eyes grew round, and the cor- 
ners of Paul's quizzical mouth twitched as 
he watched her wondering stare. 

" Sometimes ' I think," slowly said 
mamma, looking through the window, up 
into the sky, while three pairs of young 
eyes noted her far-away glance — " some- 
times I think, children, that I ought never 
to find fault with you, for I cry and rebel 
over my lessons far worse than any of] 
you. I feel this way. I can't understand 
it, you know. ' I can't understand why I 
must learn such hard things !" 

" Why, that's exactly the way I feel 
exclaimed Nell. 

" But my teacher is very firm 
he says ' must,' I have to obey, 
struggle and get angiy, or cry. 
say 'I won't,' or 'I can't,' or 'It is too 
hard ; ' but in the end I have to learn my 
lesson just the same. And as soon as 
have finished one lesson my teacher sets 
me another, and it is always a little more] 
difficult than the last." 

"Ah!" said Paul, with a deep-drawn 
breath. 

"And then I make the same struggle 
and fight as before; but it is just as use- 
less, you know, dears ; I have to learn it 
just the same." — Exchange. 



When 
I may 
I may 



We are in receipt of .the second issue of 
Talking Leaves, published by Methuen,: 
Mass., high school. It is a well edited 
paper, and presents a fine appearance, bull 
it might be improved by cutting down the 
size and adding a few more pages. 

£ tT $10 and $20, Genuine Confederate Bills 
* only five cents each ; $50 and $100 bills 
10 cents each ; 25c and 50c shinplasters \\ 
cents each ; $1 and $2 bills 25 cents each. Sew 
securely sealed on receipt of price. Address,, 
Chas. D. Barker, 90 S. Forsyth St., At- 
lanta, Ga. 



3£ 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



15 



eat 
arn 



c 



UMBERLAND VALLEY RAILROAD. 
TIMETABLE— Oct. 1, 1893. 



a ^ down Trains. 

aul 
•om 



, all 
ons 
hey 
t is 
on 
i as 
lo." 
Cor- 
el as 

said 
. up 

»Ullg 

mie- 
ever 
•ebel 

y of 

tand 
hyl 

jell' 

,'hen 
may 
may 

3 tOO 

my 
as I 

sets 
more 

raws 

iggle 
; use- 
it, 



Lv. Winchester 

" Martinsburg . ... 

1 Hagerstown 

» Greencastle 

" Chambersburg .. 

" Shippensburg 

" NewviUe 

" Carlisle 

" Mechanicsburg.. 
Ar. Diilsburg 

" Harrisburg 



Philadelphia. 

New York 

Baltimore — 



C'bg 
Acc. 



6 10 
6 32 

6 53 

7 18 
7 42 



8 03 

11 25 
2 03 
11 15 

A. M. 



Ky'e 
Exp 



A. M. 

6 15 
700 

7 40 

8 09 
8 30 

8 55 

9 15 
9 40 

10 04 



10 25 

1 25 
4 03 
3 10 
P. M. 



Mr'g Day 
Mail Exp 



No. 4 No. 6 



1 25 
4 03 
3 10 

P. M. 



11 25 

11 48 

12 08 
12 30 
12 50 

1 15 
1 40 



200 



6 45 
P. M. 



Ev'g 
Mail 



P. M. 

2 30 

3 20 

4 10 

4 36 

5 00 
5 30 

5 51 
617 

6 43 



7 05 

11 15 
3 50 
10 40 
P. M. 



N'gt 
Exp 



P. M. 

3 20 

4 50 

7 10 
736 

8 00 
8 16 

8 53 
920 

9 43 

10 05 

A. M. 
4 30 
7 33 
6 20 

AM. 



Additional trains will leave Carlisle daily except Sunday at 
5:55 a. m., 7:68 a. m., 3:40 p. m., stopping at all intermediate 
stations, arriving at Harrisburg at 6:40 a. m., 8:03 a. m., 4:30 
p. m. 

Evening Mail runs daily between Harrisburg and Cham 
bersburg. 



Up Trains. 



Lv. Baltimore 

" New York .. .. 
" Philadelphia.. 



" Harrisburg 

" Diilsburg 

" Mechanicsburg. 

" Carlisle 

" Newville 

" Shippensburg.... 

" Chambersburg.. 

" Greencastle 

" Hagerstown 

" Martinsburg 

Ar. Winchester 



Win 


Me's 


Hag 


Ev'g 


C'bg 


N. O. 


Acc. 


Exp 


Acc. 


Mail 


Acc. 


Exp- 


No. 1 


No. 3 


No. 5 No. 7 No. 17 


No. 9 


P. m. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


11 40 


4 45 


853 


11 20 


2 15 


4 23 


8 00 


1215 




900 


200 


2 06 


11 20 


4 30 


8 50 


11 50 


220 


4 30 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


4 40 


7 53 


12 40 


340 


520 


8 00 


5 03 


8 13 


103 


4 01 


5 41 


820 


5 30 


8 36 


1 29 


4 25 


6 05 


8 44 


555 


900 


1 52 


4 55 


6 36 


9 08 


6 15 


9 21 


2 13 


5 10 


6 57 


9 29 


6 40 


9 43 


2 35 


535 


•7 20 


950 


7 02 


10 04 


3 01 


550 




10 12 


725 


10 27 


325 


6 18 




10 35 


930 


11 12 




7 02 






11 00 


12 00 




7 50 






A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 



me o 
hued 
jditel 
e, but 
m th< 



Additional trains will leave Harrisburg daily except Sunday 
at 10:35 a. m.. 10:45 p. m., arriving at Carlisle at 11:20 a. m., 
11:30 p. m., stopping at all intermediate stations ; additional 
train will leave Hagerstown at 8:00 a. m., arriving at 11:00 
a. m., stopping at all i"termediate stations. 

Pullman PalaceSleepingCars between Hagerstown and New 
York on Keystone Express and Night Express east, and on 
Memphis Express and New Orleans Express west. 

Pullman Sleeping Cars on Night Express and New Orleans 
Express between Philadelphia and Nt-w Orleans. 

IF you wish to advertise anything anywhere at any time, 
write to GEO. P. ROW ELL & Co., No. 10 Spruce Street, 
New York. 

EVERV one in need if information on the subject of ad- 
vertisiug will do well to obtain a copy of "Book for 
Advertisers, " 368 pages, price one dollar. Mailed, postage 
Paw on receiptor price. Contains acareful compilation from 
tiie American Newspaper Directory of all the best papers 
ana class journals; gives the circulation rating of every one, 
ana a good deal of information about rates and other matters 
pertaining to the business of advertising. Address KOW- 
York A " VEI{T ISINU BUREAU, 10 Spruce Street, New 



ROOFING. 

GUM-ELASTIC ROOFING FELT costs 
only $2.00 per 100 square feet. Makes a 
good roof for years and anyone can put it on. 
GUM-ELASTIC PAINT costs only 6o cents 
o Bills Sfl. in bbl. lots, or $4.50 for 5 -gal. tubs. 
a T.nu b- 0l ? r da rk red. Will stop leaks in tin or iron 
l c 10 r °£ fs l , hat will last for years. TRY IT. 

kend stamp for samples and full particulars. 

GUM ELASTIC ROOFING CO. 
t-j At 1 and 41 w - Broadway, New York. 

I O CAL AGENTS'WANTED. 



Bill 

;ers lOi 
. Se4 
1 dress, 
At- 



W. F. BECKER. 



J. P. BRUGGER, 



Eastern Book Store, 

315 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

BOOKS AND STATIONER Y, 

Special Kates to Students. 

WW Second-Hand School Books a Specialty. 

WRITE FOK PRICES. 



J 



L. SAYLOR & SONS, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

CARRIAGES, 

LIGHT BUGGIES, PONY PHAETONS, ETC. 
STRICTLY FIRST CLASS. 

Shops Opposite Eagle Hotel, ANNVILLE, PA 

7 B. MARSHALL, M. D., 

No. 34 East Main Street, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



ISAAC MANN & SON, 

— ~-S- THE -S^-— 

LARGEST CLOTHIERS, 

834 Cumberland Street, 

LEBANON, I>A. 

THE BEST GOODS FOR THE LEAST MONEY. 



T R. McCAULY, 




DAILY MEAT 


MARKET. 


GOOD MEAT. LOW PRICES. 


ANNVILLE, PA. 


JOHN TRUMP, 




J BOOT AND SHOE MAKER, 


ANNVILLE, 


PA. 



WS. SEABOLD, 
. DEALER IN 

Drugs, Medicines, Perfumery and Toilet Articles, 

No. 2 East Main St., Annville, Pa. 



J- 



S. KENDIG, 
13 A 

Next Door to Eagle Hotel, Annville, Pa. 



w 



J. KIEFER, M. D., 
HOMEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 
70 West Main St., Annville, Pa. 

DEXTER LIVERY AND BOARDING STABLE 
RAILROAD ST., ANNVILLE, PA. 

R. A. MAULFAIR, - PROP'R. 

GOOD TEAMS AT REASONABLE BATES. 



16 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



D' 



^^ILLIAM KIEBLER, 
SHAVING AND HAIR DRESSING, 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop, Annville, Pa. 

ADAM B. HESS, 
OFFICE AT THE HOTEL EAGLE. 
OMNIBUS TO ALL TRAINS. 

ANNVILLE. PA. 

JACOB SARGENT, 
FASHIONABLE TAILOR, 

18 and 30 Main St., Annville, Pa. 

k R Y GOODS, NOTIONS, GRO- 
CERIES, BOOTS and SHOES, 

—AND— 

GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS. 
«r. s. SHOPE, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

AC. M. HEISTER, 
• STATIONERY JOB PRINTER, 

Visiting Cards a Specialty. 
35 S. White Oak Street - - Annville, Pa. 

WILLIAM WALTZ, 
FASHIONABLE 

HAIR CUTTING AND SHAVING SALOON, 

West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
H. H. KKEIDEB.. JSO. E. HERB. 

KREIDER & CO., 
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

Hard & Soft Coal, Grain, Seeds Salt & Feed. 

Office: Railroad Street, near Depot, 
Telephone Connection. AXXVILLE, PA. 

THE BEST STOCK, THE LOWEST 
l'IMCES IN 

FURNITURE, JOS 

EPH MILLER'S. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

IVLn EC- SHAUD, 

DEALER IN 

Gold Watches and Jewelry, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer In 
FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYS 
TERS AND CREAM. ANNVILLE, PA. 

S. M. SHEIK'S BAKERY, 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

FRESH BREAD, CAKES AND ROLLS, 

One Door West Penn'a House, Annville. 
St. 33. -VVjSLG-lSriEJI*., 

— ^-v Headquarters »• or -v — 

GROCERIES, CONFECTIONERIES 

OYSTERS, FRUITS AND NUTS. 
Restaurant Attached. Meals at All Hours 

12 West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



Volt 



If yon want to Bny a Hat rignt, and a rignt Hat, or anytning in 
Men's Furnishings, 

GO TO 

Successors to RAITT & Co., 
Eighth and Cumberland Sts., Lebanon, Pa. 

ANNVILLE, PA., / 

and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home-made, 
Ingrain and Brussels Carpets. You buy Cheaper 
from us than away trom home, and have a large 
stock to select from. 



Dealers in Dry Goods, Notions 



U.B, MUTUAL AID SOCIETY 

OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

HOME OFFICE, LEBANON, PENNA. 

Chartered by the State Legislature, March 11, 1869. 
Positive amounts guaranteed and claims paid in 
full. 

Benefits of $1000 insurance secured for $S.f 0. 
Reciprocal Circle Insurance,new and very popular. 

Invested Assets $146,809.94 

Contingent Assets 116,970.00 

Assessment Basis 5,205,000.00 

Death Losses Paid • 6,774,123.01 

THE TPJ-tAJN. 

Thepayment of EIGHT DOLLARS on application, 
FIVE DOLLARS annually for four years, and there- 
after TWO DOLLARS annually during life, with 
pro rata mortality assessments for each death of a 
member insured for $1000, is as follows: 



Age. 


Ass't 


Age. 


Ass'mt 


Agk. 


Ass'mt 


20 


65 


30 


75 


40 


90 


21 


66 


31 


77 


41 


92 


22 


67 


32 


79 


42 


94 


23 


68 


33 


81 


43 


96 


24 


69 


34 


83 


44 


98 


25 


70 


35 


85 


45 


1 0,) 


26 


71 


36 


86 


46 


1 06 


27 


72 


37 


87 


47 


1 12 


28 


73 


38 


88 


48 


1 18 


29 


74 


39 


89 


49 


1 24 



Age. 



50 
61 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 



Assm't 



1 30 
1 40 
1 50 
1 60 
1 70 
1 80 
1 92 



'he Pre 
unday 
rayer J 
ditoria 
Tationa 
ollege 
xchanj 
ollege 
hiloko; 
-alozeti 



This will entitle a member to a certificate of $1000 
to be paid after death to the legal beneticiary, when- 
ever such death may occur. 

Reliable Agents Wanted Everywhere. 



F. W. FROST, 
BOOK BINDER AND BLANK BOOK 
MANUFACTURER, 

783 Cumberland St., - - Lebanon, Pa- 



'olume VII. 



Number 2. 



THE 



Pa. 



ns 



College Forum. 



ade, 
iper 



TY 



1809. 
d in 



ular. 

809.94 
)70.00 
JOO.OO 
123.01 



,tiOM, 
here- 
with 
i of a 



SSM'T 

1 30 
1 40 
1 59 
1 60 
1 70 
1 80 
1 92 



FEBRUARY, 1894. 



. ••• CONTENTS: * . 



lie President of the Board of Trustees. .17, 18 

lunday Newspapers 18-20 

rayer for Colleges 20 

Editorials 21 

National Blessings 21, 22 

Allege Graduates 22-24 

xchanges 24 

ollege Directory 25 

hilokosmian Literary Society 25 

alozetean Literary Society 25, 26 



.vlieii* 



OK 



, pa 



Olionian Literary Society 26 

Our Alumni 26 

The Novelty Sociable 27 

Dramatic Entertainment 27 

Personals and Locals 27, 28 

Thoughts on Lebanon Valley College 28, 29 

Improvement in the Department of Music 29 

A Normal Class 29 

America Leads the World 29, 30 

Advertisements 30-32 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



HARRY LIGHT, 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 



22 EAST MAIN ST., ANNVILLE, PA. 



w 
o 
as 

<5 
« 
o 
X 
w 

Q 

as 
<j 

■—j 

w 

CO 
W 



Our shelves are constantly filled with 
New, Second-Hand and Shelf-Worn 



Together with a Complete Assortment of 

STATIONERY, 

Wall Paper and Window Shades. 

A Selected Stock of the 

LATEST STYLES OF WALL PAPER 

AXD 

DECORATIONS. 



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SCHOOL AND COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS A SPECIALTY. 
C- SMITH, 
& 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 



INCLUDING 
NOR3VIA.3L, DEPARTMENT. 
OLD BOOKS. NEW BOOKS. 

Cheapest place in the Lebanon Valley to buy your 
Books. New and Old Books Bought, 
Sold and Exchanged. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY, 

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Spectacles a Specialty, Fitte(l iBSJ^t? Gold 

PERFECT FOCUS AND FIT GUARANTEED. 



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838 CUMBERLAND STREET. 

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Susan's Truthful Words. 

" Said Susan Grey, one bright spring day. 
Of floral books that come to me, 
There's none which helps me to decide, 
As well as Jas. Vick's Floral Guide, 
Upon the different flowers, 
With which to fill my fragrant bowers. 
Its charming leaves are always full, 
Of flowers new and flowers old ; 
As Aster and Anemone, 
Or the sweet-scented Marigold. 
So many others could be named, 
Each one of which has been far-famed 
Indeed no other book need hope, 
In excellence w ith this to cope." 
Ten cents will bring it to your door, 
From Jas. Vick's Sons, of Rochester! 




JAS. VICK'S SONS 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



BOOKS! BOOKS! BOOB 



The ten cents may be deducted from yoi ^ 

first order. * s 

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When you need Books or Stationery of any Id 
correspond with or call on us. By so doing yoni 
secure the Best Goods at the most Favorable Pri« 

Stock always New and Fresh. Assortment LM 
Prices the Lowest. Whether you intend to buy! 
or $-25.00 worth, it will pay you to call to see us. 

Bagster's and Oxford Teachers' Bibles a Spec! 
We carry in stock the publications of the V. 
Publishing House, such as Otterbein Hymn 
Hymns of the Sanctuary, the Books used itt 
three years' course of study, S. S. Music Books. 

AGENTS WANTED to sell the best and 1 
popular Lord's Prayer published. Send 75 cent 
sample copy, worth $2.00. Address plainly 

CRIDER & BROTHER, 

PUBLISHERS OF 




lama 



Photograph Family Records, Etc, Etc., 

YORK, PA. 

College Forum." 



THE COLLEGE EORUM. 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Vol. VII. No. 2. ANNVILLE, PA., FEBRUARY, 1894. Whole No. 68. 



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The President of the Board of 
Trustees. 

It affords us much pleasure to be able 
to present to our readers a brief sketch of 
Mr. David W. Crider, of York, Pa. He 
is oue of the most prominent business 
men of that city, being engaged as pub- 
lisher and bookseller. ' 

He is a son of ^ 
Jacob and Cathar- 
ine (Mouer) Crider. 
His father was a 
native of Lebanon 
county and his mo- 
ther of Cumberland 
county, both of 
German ancestry. 
David grew to man- 
hood on his father's 
farm, in Franklin 
county, near Cham- 
bersburg, where he 
was born, May 22, 
1842. He received 
the rudiments of his 
education in the 
public schools, sub- 
sequently attend- 
ing the Cumberland 
County Normal 
School. While 
there the call was 
made for men to 
leave home and 
loved ones, and risk 
their lives in defense of country. 
He enlisted in Company E, One Hundred 
and Thirtieth Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry, as a private soldier, and served 
nine months. 

His regiment was in the Army of the 
Potomac, and participated in the battle of 
°i Antietam, where 196 of his regiment 
Were killed. In this engagement he was 
bounded in two places, the neck and leg, and 
was at first officially reported dead. After 



his term of enlistment expired, and when 
the country demanded more soldiers, he 
responded by re-enlisting, and joined the 
Two Hundred and Seventh Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry, in which he remained 
until the close of the war. He was pres- 
ent at a series of battles in front of Peters- 
burg, Fort Steadman, the battle of Chan- 
cellorsville, and many minor engagements 
and skirmishes. 

He had the 
honor of being 
present at the 
surrender of Gen- 
eral Lee at Appo- 
mattox, and was 
present at the 
grand review at 
Washington, D. 
C. In the last 
enlistment he was 
quartermaster ser- 
geant of his regi- 
ment, which was 
mustered out of 
service at Alex- 
andria, Va. At 
present he is an 
honored member 
of the Grand 
Army of the Re- 
public. 

After the close 
of the war he 
taught school one 
3^ear at Keedys- 
ville, Md. He then entered Lebanon Val- 
ley College. While here the Philokosmian 
Literary Society was founded, and he be- 
came its first president. From this time 
he has been a staunch friend and an 
earnest worker in behalf of Lebanon Val- 
ley College. 

In the year 1818 he was elected a Trus- 
tee of the College, and has held that office 
ever since, being president of the Board 
of Trustees for the last three years. 




D. W. CKIDEH. 



18 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



In 1889 the General Conference elected 
Mr. Crider a member of the Board of 
Trustees of the United Brethren Publish- 
House, Dayton, Ohio, as the repre- 
sentative for the Church east of the Alle- 
ghenies. 

In this Board his superior executive 
ability was soon recognized by an election 
to its chair, which honor he was compelled 
to decline because of other labors and the 
disadvantage of distance. At the late 
General Conference he was re-elected for 
a term of four years. 

In May, 1892, he represented the found- 
ers of the Philokosmian Literaiy Societ} r 
at its twenty-fifth anniversary. Yery ap- 
propriate was it that at that time his son, 
Horace, then a student, should then 
occupy the Chair. 

Mr. Crider has been an active Sundajr- 
school worker, and for a number of years 
was president of the York County Sunday- 
school Union. 

He is one of our most successful busi- 
ness men, and is exerting an invaluable 
influence for the Church, for the cause of 
education and good in general. His be- 
nevolence has made Lebanon Yalley Col- 
lege grateful to him for several thousand 
dollars. 

He is the happ}- father of an interesting 
family, lives in an elegant and comfortable 
home at York, which is the favorite resort 
of bishops, ministers, and his many other 
friends, and is a popular man wherever 
known. 



Sunday Newspapers. 

The remembrance of the Sabbath Day 
to keep it holy is the foundation stone of 
our government, and the onby hope of 
permanent American freedom and pro- 
gress. The stability of our country, and 
the advancement of otir race, depend, very 
largely upon the mode in which this 
sacred day of rest shall be used and ob- 
served. One need not be pessimistical in 
his views or Puritanical in priciples, to 
realize with what deadly effect the Ameri- 
can Sabbath, that citadel of Christianity 
and patriotism, has been assailed. The 
degree of strictness with which the Sab- 
bath is observed, or the contrary, is a fair 
criterion of the degree of spiritual religion 
in any land. By this test woefully disso- 
lute is the condition of our Nation ! 

Yonder drifts a ship slowly through 
the Narrows into the New York harbor 



bearing all the evidence of a tempestuous; 
passage. The mainmast, foremast and 
mizzenmast are twisted off; the sails are 
torn and lost ; the shrouds and ratlines 
are dangling useless at the sides ; the 
rudder dismantled, the cabin demolished, 
the lifeboats off' the davits. The white 
incrustation on eveiy part shows with 
what fury the salty waves beat upon her. 
Every man on board is working at the 
pumps to keep from sinking before they 
get to wharfage. That ship is the institu- 
tion of the Holy Sabbath, launched by 
the Creator grandly from the banks of 
the Euphrates and floating out on the sea 
of time for the admiration and happiness 
of all nations. But infidelity struck it 
on one side, and avarice struck it on an- 
other side, while the hurricanes of Sunday 
trains, mails and newspapers struck it on 
all sides, until that ship needs repair in 
every plank and beam, every sail and 
bolt. In other words, the notions of 
modern society must be reconstructed on 
the subject of Sabbatical rest, and the 
press, with its permeating influence and 
recognized ability, ought to be the leader 
in the reconstruction and the prime cause 
in the restoration of the proper observance 
of this sacred da}^ instead of being first 
in its desecration and chief in its secular- 
ization. 

The Divine Covenant guarantees ai 
weekly day of rest to every inhabitant of 
the globe, and therefore the Sabbath was 
instituted to secure the highest possible 
development and welfare of the human 
race. Hence any system or institution 
that robs a single individual of this right 
is guilty of nothing less than striving 
against the benevolent designs of the 
Creator, and dwarfing instead of develop- 
ing the physical, intellectual and spiritual 
natures of being thus robbed ; and the 
Sunday press, an institution that through 
its work clirectby, and its influence inj 
directl}-, deprives millions of this inherent 
right, ought to be regarded in its tntf 
light — an enemy to God, to morality an( 
to humanity. 

That the Sunday newspapers deprive 
one hundred and fifty thousand editors, 
reporters and printers of their God-given 
weekly rest is self-evident. We are re- 
peatedly told the Sunday paper is pre- 
pared on Saturday and the Monday paper 
is the chief sinner. This is only half the 
truth, and, as is always the case, is the 
worst untruth. It is quite natural that 



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THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



19 



ous 
and 
are 



the issue of seven editions of a daily 
paper requires seven days ; but it is 
equally natural that six editions require 
only six days, leaving the seventh for 
rest. 

But not only are one hundred and fifty 
thousand newspaper employees deprived 
of their weekly rest in the preparation of 
the Sunday paper, but in its distribution 
fifty thousand newsboys are worse than 
deprived.- Fifty thousand newsboys are 
on the streets every Sunday when the}' 
ought to be in Sunday-school. Fifty 
thousand boys paid to descrate the Sab- 
bath ; taught and encouraged to disobey 
the laws of God and the State ; deprived, 
of training in obedience to the designs of 
the Creator ; engaged in the worst form 
of child-labor, which dwarfs not only the 
body, but the conscience ; and all this in a 
Christian age and nation. You who be- 
lieve the work on a Sunday paper is done 
on Saturday, you, I ask, what about this 
army of fifty thousand strong, that takes 
possession of all our cities and towns 
every Sabbath and bombards them with 
missiles, compared with which shells and 
cannon balls were heaven-sent blessings. 
If Sunday newspapers are printed on Sat- 
urday, when are they distributed ? 

Then these two armies are immeasurably 
augmented by that host which buys and 
reads the Sunday paper. Reading, as 
well as printing and dristributing, is a 
great interference with general rest. Mil- 
lions of readers are chained continually 
to business, gossip and politics, seven 
days in the week. The non-church-goers 
are certainly not edified by the best Sun- 
day paper ; and those who go to church, 
after reading through pages of scandal 
and sensationalism, have hearts and minds 
preoccupied. If ever in modern times 
the Word of God falls on unfruitful 
ground it must be when the morning 
hours of the Sabbath have been spent 
in poring over Sunday newspapers, sear- 
ing the Conscience and dwarfing spir- 
itual development. Does not that Chris- 
tian (?) lack common sense, or what is 
perhaps worse, common sincerity, who, 
before or after church, saturates his mind 
with such things as the Sunday newspaper 
contains, and yet says he desires to be a 
-good man and grow in grace ? 

J or all this work, business desecration 
and unrest, the Sunday newspaper is di- 
rectly responsible, and, terrible as it is, 
ne de grading influences, indirectly ex- 



erted throughout the land, are even worse. 
There is an ethical principle involved, 
which all who desire the welfare of hu- 
manity can not overlook. In the annals 
of nations, time emphasizes with pitiless 
force the fact that " whatever is sown 
must be reaped." The abstract principles 
of right and wrong, the ethical truths 
which underlie civilization, and which 
must ever give to it permanency and 
growth can not be disregarded without 
fatal results. The impiety and incon- 
sistency of the Sunday press is rapidly 
bringing the Nation a harvest of whirl- 
winds. Eve^ Sunday newspaper teaches, 
by its very appearance on this sacred da}-, 
that the Fourth Commandment is anti- 
quated and obsolete ; that it is no longer 
to be observed by the nations of the 
earth in the nineteenth century ; and 
that the Sabbath has outlived its useful- 
ness. In this belief it trains mil- 
lions of readers, carriers and printers * 
yet it contains hypocritical editorials con- 
demning theft and murder. What right, I 
ask, has the violator of the Fourth Com- 
mandment to demand the observance of 
the Sixth and Eighth. If the Fourth is 
out of date the smallest newsboy in America 
has sense enough to know that the re- 
maining nine are equally void. If the 
American press can violate the Fourth 
with impunity, the American people can 
with equal propriety disregard the rest. 
And they are doing it. The hurricanes 
of infidelity, anarchy, crime and corrup- 
tion that sweep over our land are only 
the ripened harvests of what has been 
sown ; and whatever causes may have 
combined to produce these results, that 
Sabbath desecrator, the Sunday press, is 
not the least among them. 

In the beginning the Creator gave a 
precious and everlasting gift to the human 
race — a day of rest and meditation — and 
centuries later from Sinai proclaimed, 
"Remember the Sabbath Day;'' and 
again, hundreds of years afterward, amid 
the cumulative desecration of ages, de- 
clared to disobedient Israel : " If ye will 
not hearken unto me and keep the Sabbath 
Day holy, I will kindle a fire against the 
gates of J erusalem and the palaces thereof, 
that shall not be quenched." Though 
ages pass man dare never presume to be 
wiser than his Maker and abrograte what 
He instituted. Israel paid a terrible penalty 
for her disobedience, and the American 
nation will the same. Divine revelation 



20 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



and the teachings of centuries of history 
should profit by her example. 

The advocates of Sunda}^ newspapers 
tell us the people demand them. While 
this may be true now, it was certainly not 
true forty years ago. At that time no 
paper issued Sunday editions except 
against the remonstrance of readers. 
Among others the New York Tribune 
and the Philadelphia Press both had the 
humiliating experience of being compelled 
to abandon their Sunday issues on account 
of the vigorous protests of subscribers 
and advertisers. The truth is the Sunday 
newspaper itself created the demand which 
it noW-'uses as an excuse for its publica- 
tion. 

Even if the people now demand them 
as they also demand saloons and kindred 
evils, we dare not consider it a valid 
reason for their circulation. The people 
at one time demanded a golden calf for 
their adoration, and at another they de- 
manded the death of an innocent personage 
to satisfy their insatiable hatred. In 
each instance scheming politicians, to 
their eternal disgrace, consented to these 
popular demands. Though a howling 
mob clamored a universal demand for the 
death of our Saviour, Pilate has never 
been justified for his accession ; and the 
evils of the Sunday newspaper are too 
flagrant, and its degrading influences too 
undesirable, to be sheltered by the per- 
fidious excuse " The people demanded 
them." 

On the one hand God with sovereign 
right demands an inviolate Sabbath, holy 
and unprofaned. On the other a depraved 
populace with daring impiety demands a 
secularized Sabbath, desecrated and un- 
heeded. We have the highest authority 
for believing that God does not demand 
the observance of the Sabbath arbitrarily, 
but on the contrary, for the temporal 
benefit and enjoyment of the individual, 
and the prosperity and stability of nations 
and governments, as well as for the 
eternal happiness and welfare of immortal 
souls. " Whether it be right in the sight 
of God to hearken unto men more than 
unto God, judge ye." 

Ira B. Albert, '9t. 



Prayer for Colleges. 

The Day of Prayer for Colleges was 
very appropriately observed at this insti- 
tution this year. Through the courtesy 



of Rev. Mr. Spayd, pastor of the U. B. 
church of this town, President Bierman 
occupied the pulpit on the Sunday pre- 
vious and delivered an interesting address 
on Education to a large and attentive 
audience. After discussing the value of 
prayer in general and the special need of 
it at this time for our own and other 
colleges, he referred to the founding of 
numerous institutions in answer to prayer 
and the gracious work wrought in maul 
of them through the instrumentality of 
pious and devoted students. He com- 
pared the work of the decidedly Christian 
college with that of the non-Christian, 
like the University of Virginia and others. 
Christianity is not a religion of forms and 
ceremonies, but of mind and heart. The 
Church always cared for and sustained 
the colleges of our land. 

Praying for these institutions founded 
by our Church fathers is a duty as well as 
a privilege, and while we pray for the 
College we pray for the Church that 
founded it, for the ministry that sustains 
it, for the missions that are largely sup- 
plied with men prepared by it, for the 
great revivals of religion that are carried 
forward in many of them, and for the 
sound faith that is indoctrinated by them. 
The Church must sustain these divinely 
established institutions and see to it that 
money and young men and women are 
placed there to continue the work, for 
unless the College goes forward all other 
enterprises of Christian benevolence are 
at a stand, since money and means are 
powerless without men. 

On Thursday, the day appointed for 
prayer, friends and students of the College 
met again in the President's recitation 
room and there spent an hour in devotion. 
Remarks were made by Rev. Henry B. 
Spayd, Mr. Daniel D. Keedy of Maryland, 
and President Bierman. 

The exercises on this occasion were of 
a highly spiritual character. Again it 
was manifest that Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege has a warm place in the hearts of its 
students and teachers, and all went away 
hopeful. 



The December number of the Oak, Lilly 
and Ivy contains several well written 
stories. 

"A Christmas Lamp " and " Long Ago" 
are two well written stories in the Christ- 
mas number of the Muhlenberg. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



21 



EDITORS. 



H. CLAY DEANER, A. M., 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher. 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 



John H. Maysilles, '95. Ira E. Albert, '97. 

George H. Stein, '97. 



EXCHANGE EDIT0U. 

D. S. E8HLEMAN, '94. 

ALUMNI EIUT0R. 

Prop. John E. Lehman, A. M. 



SOCIETY EDITORS. 

Clionian Society— Miss Estella Stehman, '96. 
Philokosmian Society— Oscar E. Good, '94. 
Kalozetean Society— James F. Zug, '94. 

THE COLLEGE FORUM will be sent monthly for one 
school year on receipt of twenty-five cents. Subscriptions 
received at any time. 

For terms of advertising, address the Publisher. 



Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as 
second-class mail matter. 



Efcttortal. 

We would like to have some good agents 
to canvass for the College Forum. Write 
for rates. 



Any subscriber failing to receive the 
Forum, or changing his address, should 
notify us. It is our purpose to have the 
Forum reach every subscriber monthly. 



Several responded to the proposition 
of a j^ear's subscription to the College 
Forum for back numbers. All were re- 
ceived except No. 4, April, 1888. The 
proposition is still o- od for this number. 



Arrangements have been made that 
there will be systematic drill in the gym- 
nasium. It is hoped that all will avail 
themselves of this opportunity of physical 
development. There can only be "a sound 
mind in a sound body." 



Dr. Harper, in saying that " the story 
of Cain and Abel, as told in Genesis, was 
; i myth," and " was only told for the pur- 
pose of religious teaching," seems to dis- 
credit the history of the Bible, and if he 



discredits its histoiy he surely must dis- 
credit all. Utterances of this kind from 
such men as Dr. Harper must be produc- 
tive of disbelief among those whose faith 
is not well grounded, and is to be re- 
gretted. 



The scheme for a coalition of the prin- 
cipal debating clubs of Harvard, Yale, 
Princeton, Columbia and the University 
of Pennsylvania is quite novel in its in- 
ception. The idea is to have a general 
subject for all the societies for discussion 
on one night of each month. During the 
three weeks prior to the debates, articles 
are to appear on the topic selected by 
prominent men in the leading magazines. 
Such a consensus of opinions to supplant 
individual effort cannot fail to be produc- 
tive of great good. 



The sweetest thoughts of mortal man 
Is that which comes to editors, 
When a subscriber for past years 
Pays up in full his old arrears. — 8. 



National Blessings. 

THEY BRING ALSO MANY RESPONSIBILITIES — 
ADVICE TO SONS OF VETERANS. 

The following is an extract of an able 
sermon preached by the Rev. B. F. Daugh- 
erty, Class of 1889, January 28th, at Fifth 
United Brethren Church, Baltimore, Md., 
to Ellsworth Camp, Sons of Veterans, on 
"Our National Blessings and Responsi- 
bilities." His text was, "God hath not 
dealt so with any nation." Mr. Daugherty 
said : 

"No nation has ever had such an era of 
greatness and prosperity as the America 
of the nineteenth century. The golden 
ages of the nations of the past are not 
worthy to be compared to the greatness 
and glory of this American period, al- 
though we are not ready to admit that 
this is to be the golden era of American 
history. No nation aside from our own 
could ever make the'proud boast of a gov- 
ernment of the people, by the people and 
for the. people. No other country lias 
such principles and institutions for the 
inspiration of patriotism as our own. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Where shall we look for a parallel in per- 
sonal liberty, social privileges, political 
eqnalit} 7 and universal religious freedom? 

" To be able to say ' I am an American 
citizen ' represents privileges and prerog- 
atives not equaled by any other inhabit- 
ants of the globe. 

"The material greatness of our coun- 
try, including the extent and variety of 
our domain and our resources — mineral, 
agricultural and manufacturing — rich and 
inexhaustible, is not equaled anywhere 
else in the world. 

" The history of our growth and devel- 
opment during this century is simply 
marvelous. Beginning the century with 
small national credit and untried national 
experience, we have risen to be the peer 
of nations. Though thrice bathed in 
blood, the national honor was sustained 
in each case. The era of prosperity since 
the civil war is not equaled by &ny other 
country in any age. 

" With all this glorious record we have 
grave responsibilities. Serious dangers 
confront us. It will require the noblest 
manhood of Church and State to preserve 
our free institutions. 

"The ballot-box, that sacred ark of 
priceless liberty, must be preserved invio- 
late. Personal liberty must be exercised 
versus compulsion and intimidation. We 
should also have better laws against un- 
restricted immigration. The heterogene- 
ous conglomeration of the worst elements 
of all countries may prove to be the Huns 
and Yandals of our destruction. Socialists 
and Anarchists are the results of our loose 
laws. We should welcome the good of all 
nationalities who mean to become law- 
abiding American citizens — the Chinaman 
not excepted. 

" Every attempt that hints at the union 
of Church and State should be persist- 
ently repudiated. State funds must be 
held sacred for State purposes, and no ap- 
propriation must be allowed for sectarian 
purposes. This would be the first step 
toward the union of Church and State. 

"The responsibility of purifying poli- 
tics is also upon us. He only who seeks 
the good of the State and nation should 
be allowed in our legislative assemblies. 
Alleged Senatorial courtesy should be no 
reason for rejecting qualified men, though 
not in the ring. 

" The saloon, with its blighting influ- 
ences, should be forever expelled from 
politics and from existence an3 r where in 



this fair land. This can only be done by 
supporting good men and good methods 
in all political parties and by an enlight- 
ened, strengthened and enforced Christian 
sentiment against this monstrous power 
of evil. The application of the principles 
of Christian^ alone will be the remedy 
for all our evils. These responsibilities 
are largely upon the young men of to-day. 



College Graduates. 

N. C. SCHAEFFER, D. D., STATE SUPERIN- 
TENDENT. 

We need more college-bred teachers in 
the common schools, especially in the 
grammar and high school grades. The 
colleges owe it to themselves as well as to 
the State to meet this pressing and grow- 
ing need of the times by establishing a 
chair of pedagogics, so that, in addition 
to scholastic attainments, their graduates 
may have working knowledge of the prin- 
ciples which underlie the vocation of 
teacher. To every intelligent observer 
who is familiar with the educational field 
and its existing conditions, and who has 
insight sufficient to perceive defects as 
well as to appreciate its boasted merits, 
this need is self-evident. 

The times call for concerted and patri- 
otic action on the part of our higher in- 
stitutions of learning to supply the men 
who are needed. The expenditure of the 
enormous sum of over sixteen millions of 
dollars a year upon our system of public 
instruction, requires that there should he 
a broadening of its scope and an enlarge- 
ment of its functions. We must get the 
worth of the money that is expended upon 
the schools. The coming generations 
must be educated up to the requirements 
of the Constitution and the demands 
which the approaching twentieth century 
will make upon them for the solution of 
portentous problems, not only in the in- 
terest of the land we love, but for the 
benefit of nil mankind. 

The schools do not want more men who 
are merely graduates of colleges and no 
more than that. They want men who 
would be men everywhere, in any calling; 
who would be wise teachers with but little 
learning, but whose usefulness is im- 
mensely increased by the broad training 
which it is the business of the college o" 
university to give to its faithful students 
Not any college graduate can learn t" 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



23 



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teach. A man may know many things; he 
may be an authority in literature or sci- 
ence, or both, and yet fail utterly as a 
teacher. His temperament may be at fault, 
or he may be ignorant or impatient of the 
elementary branches which are essential 
in the schoolroom. 

Teachers should have the broad culture 
and the extended range of mental vision 
which the higher branches impart, but 
they must at the same time be skilled in 
the rudiments of learning and "apt to 
teach." Here it is often found that the 
college graduate is weak. Roll together 
into one an old-school, hard-headed Pres- 
byterian doctor of divinity, and a fervid, 
glib-torigued Methodist circuit rider, and 
you have the model pulpit orator. Apart, 
the circuit rider may often be able to tell 
with much more effect than he knows, and 
the D. D. a great deal less, at least in such 
manner as to make it impressive and effec- 
tively useful. So if we could combine the 
broad learning and mental discipline of 
the genuine college graduate with the 
quick perception and skill in methods of 
many a teacher in the elementary schools, 
we would have an ideal common school 
teacher. 

Besides, we want more virile strength 
and influence for the teacher's platform in 
the public schools. That is to say, we 
want more men teachers and a higher 
type ; and if wages were what the\ r should 
be the men would be forthcoming. Many 
an unclassified rural school, willing to pay 
the salary needed to secure and retain the 
services of such a college graduate teacher 
as we have in mind, presents a very rich 
field of effort for high scholarship and the 
best teaching skill. . 

What Alexander Ramsey did for the 
school children of Kutztown can be done 
for school children everywhere, if men of 
the same learning and ability and impres- 
sive force of character be brought into the 
service of the public schools. It is a per- 
vading public want. With prodigal pecu- 
niary resources, why should not that want 
be supplied ? We need, as has been said, 
more male teachers in the public schools, 
for effective discipline, for the develop- 
ment of a more robust type of manhood, 
and for the broadening influence of the 
masculine mind upon the subtlety of 
lemmine intuitions. This point also is 
tully recognized by all thoughtful ob- 
servers. J 

We refer to it here that school boards 



and friends of education may give it care- 
ful consideration. 

In the coming years the world's work 
will exemplify the "survival of the fittest." 
It will be the trained and educated men of 
thoroughly informed and disciplined minds 
who will lead the vanguard of the word's 
progress in all fields of human endeavor. 
But more and more every year it will* re- 
quire effort to get and maintain a firm 
foothold in the rushing flood tide of the 
world's affairs, taxing intellect and cour- 
age and high-souled heroism to the utmost 
to win victories and achieve lasting re- 
sults. The learned professions are over- 
crowded and disappointing to thousands 
of the most capable and deserving. Look- 
ing wistfully to the uncertain future, men 
of brains and culture and capability will 
seek other channels, and, leaving the beaten 
highway, turn again to paths that had 
been deserted for the time being in the 
mad rush for the tempting crown of 
plutocracy. 

A great teacher can fill as high and 
permanent a place in the world's lasting 
regard as members of any other profes- 
sion. And college graduates who have 
to work their own wa} r in the world, if 
properly equipped, cannot do better than 
to take up touching as their chosen life- 
work. The time is near at hand when the 
teaching profession will recover the lost 
prestige and influence which it enjoyed 
early in the century. With the ample 
pecuniary resurces which the Common- 
wealth scatters with a lavish hand, the 
compensation of the teacher will gradually 
become remunerative and reliable, suffi- 
ciently so, at least, to justify many a 
youthful aspirant in ambitious efforts to 
lift the vocation to a higher plane of re- 
spectability and usefulness, and therefore 
of success, both for himself and for his 
family. 

Of course, the true teacher, like the 
poet, is " born, not made." Where there 
is no natural aptitude for the vocation, no 
amount of collegiate or university educa- 
tion will make a teacher. But amongst 
the vast number of students going up 
through our higher institutions of learn- 
ing there will be thousands who, when 
brought into contact with pedagogic 
studies in the college course, will become 
interested in them and attracted to the 
work of teaching. Experince in the 
schoolroom will inspire many of them 
with a desire to make it a life-work from 



24 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



the love of it. Zeal and efficiency of their 
professional work will create confidence 
and command respect, and so impress 
public sentiment as to make them honored 
and influential in their chosen vocation. 
And the}^ will take rank among those 
whose lives are a perennial blessing to 
any community so fortunate as to number 
them among its citizens. 

One of the most useful and most suc- 
cessful teachers in Central Pennsylvania, 
whose memory is cherished with affection 
and gratitude by his pupils, scattered all 
over the continent, was a farmer's son in 
Connecticut, who, when lifting a stone 
step at the age of twenty, ruptured a blood- 
vessel, which disabled him for the time 
being for physical exertion. Teachers 
being scarce, he was persuaded by the 
neighbors to teach the district school for 
the winter. He reluctantl} r accepted the 
offer, and soon discovered to his great 
gratification that it was his born vocation, 
and he pursued it with enthusiasm and 
success, with a single business episode as 
an interruption, until life's mission was 
ended. He, of course, had to make up by 
assiduous hard study, which never inter- 
mitted, for the lack of early opportunities. 

Among college students there should be 
many hard working boys who, in drinking 
deep of the " Pierian Spring," would make 
the same discovery under much more favor- 
able circumstances, as to what nature in- 
tended them for, and, following her lead- 
ings, they would become benefactors of 
their race and exert a commanding influ- 
ence upon their day and generation. — 
Pennsylvania School Journal. 



Exchanges. 

We are pleased to welcome to our table 
this month the following new exchanges : 
The College Mercury, Philosophian Re- 
view, High School Bulletin, Peoria High 
School Opinion, The Sachem, College 
Thought, Academy Monthly, The Oracle, 
Bucknell Mirror, High School Calendar, 
High School Record, and Baltimore Y. M. 
C. A. Bulletin. All of these are well 
edited and attractive periodicals and re- 
flect great credit on the institutions they 
represent. 

One of our exchanges in a recent issue 
criticises us severely for inserting clip- 
pings from the secular press in our 
columns. We deem it vastly better to 
insert an occasional clipping, which we 




know will be of interest and benefit to our 
readers, than devote an entire page or 
more, as some of our exchanges do, to a 
collection of local clap-trap to which the 
following words of Shakespeare might be 
well applied, viz. : " He speaks an infinite 
deal of nothing. His reasons are as two 
grains of wheat hid in two bushels of 
chaff; you shall seek all day ere you find 
them ; and when }^ou have them they are 
not worth the search. 

For fifty years no smoker has graduated 
from Harvard with the honors of his 
class. — Exchange. 

Of the 3,000 students enrolled in the 
University of Berlin, 800 are American.— 
Exchange. 

The Georgia Legislature has passed a 
law excluding women from the State Nor- 
mal School. The women of Georgia 
might now justly pass a law excludin 
Legislators from intelligent society. ' 
would suggest this were it not that 
might be charged with countenancin 
cruelty to dumb animals. — Exchange. 

The University of Paris has over 1,000 
stndents, and in this, as well as other uni 
versities of France, there are no classes, 
no. athletics, no commencement day, no 
college periodicals, no glee clubs, and no 
fraternities. — Exchange. 

A thoughtful little boy asked his father: 
" Papa, do men descend from monkeys ? 
" Yes, my boy." " And what about the 
monkeys ?" And the puzzled father re- 
plied : " The monkeys descend, my boy— 
that is — er — they descend from the trees " 
— Exchange. 

Funny war 

In Brazil ! 
Pop — bang — 

Never kill ; 
Crocket hat 

Gold braid ; 
One scar't 

T'other 'fraid ; 
Fire away 
Once a week, 
Then play 

Hide and seek ; 
Shoot high 

Don't hit; 
Oh my 

Let's quit ! 
Settle up 

Pay the bill ; 
Funny war 

In Brazil.- — Exchange. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



2| 



College Directory. 
Faculty. 

E. BENJ. BIERMAN, A. M., Ph. D., 

PRESIDENT, 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 
H. CLAY DEANER, A. M., 
Professor of the Latin Language. 

JOHN E. LEHMAN, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 
Rev. JNO. A. McDERMAD, A. M., 
Professor of the Greek Language. 
JOHN A. SHOTT, Ph. B., 
Professor of Natural Science. 
MARY E. SLEICHTER, A. B., 
Professor of English Literature. 

CARRIE M. FLINT, 
Professor of Instrumental Music. 
GERTRUDE ALBERTSON, 
Professor of Harmony and Fine Art. 
HARVEY D. MILLER, B. S., 
Teacher of the Violin. 

Literary Societies. 

CLIONIAN. 
Miss ANNA E. WILSON, President. 
Miss ELLA PENNYPACKER, Secretary. 

KALOZETEAN. 
JAMES F. ZUG, President. 
SHERIDAN GARMAN, Secretary. 

PHILOEOSMIAN. 
SAMUEL F. HUBER, President. 
WILLIAM BEATTIE, Secretary. 

Y. M. C. A. 
GEO. K. HARTMAN, President. 
HARRY W. MAYER, Secretary. 
Y. W. 0. A. 
Miss MAGGIE STRICKLER, President. 
Miss ESTELLA STEHMAN, Secretary. 



Philokosmian Literary Society. 

Esse Quam Videri. 



On the evening of January 20th we were 
-igieeably surprised by the ladies, who 
came m a body to visit the society. We 
iV 6 . alwa 3 rs glad to have them With us : 
EE? P. res ence is inspiring. Among others 

hht 75? ed us durin g the P ast month are 
me following : Messrs. Sleichter, Henry, 
Uartz and Light. 

Olw he evenin g of the 16th inst. the 
hold Philok osmian Societies will 

thi« „ if lr second conjoint session for 
S Colle S e year. An interesting pro- 



pramme has been prepared and a pleasant 
session is anticipated. 

Our experience during the last term has 
shown us the necessity of adopting more 
stringent regulations with reference to the 
management of the library. Accordingly, 
a new code of rules has been decided upon, 
which, though they may occasion all of 
us some slight inconvenience, we hope 
will meet with universal approval. 

Messrs. Eshleman and Good spent 
Thursday, the first day of the month, in 
Shiremanstown, visiting Mr. Hartman, a 
member of the society, who was prevented 
by sickness from returning to College at 
the opening of the term. Mr. Hartman is 
slowly recovering and *nay soon be able 
to resume his duties at school. 

Messrs. Kreider, Hoerner and Yoe were 
among those who formed a jolly sleighing 
party on the night of the 2d inst. They 
report having had an exceedingly fine 
time. 



Kalozetean Literary Society. 

Pahna non sine pidvere. 



Societ}- items for the last month did 
not appear, oAving to the fact that our late 
editor had not learned all the mysteries 
connected with this journal. All Kalos 
may expect to see their society repre- 
sented in the future. 

The officers for this term are: 'Presi- 
dent, Jas. F. Zug ; Recording Secretary, 
S. Garman; Critic, Geo. Kindt. Under 
these names we may feel assured that the 
society's interest will not retrograde. 

The gymnasium has been thoroughly 
renovated, copious wardrobes have been 
made, and a beautiful club and dumb-bell 
rack has been placed near the entrance. 
The room is now ready to witness the 
artistic movements of the acrobats of the 
College. Many have joined, and great 
interest is shown in developing the phj^si- 
cal as well as the mental. The room is 
open from 3:15 to 4:50 p. m. All are 
welcome. 

Mrs. Lyter visited us a few weeks ago. 
Her husband, Rev* J. A. Lyter, a former 
member, is pastor of the U. B. church, 
Mt. Joy, Pa. 

We were also tendered calls by Messrs. 
Lane and Fishburn. Mr. Lane's chief 
object in coming here was to act as 
groomsman at the fashionable marriage of 
Mr. Bodenhorn and Miss Saylor. The 



26 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



parties are of Annville's best elite. Mr. 
Fishburn expects to enter the medical 
profession till fall. We wish these former 
members all success in life. 

The committee on arranging a pro- 
gramme for our seventeenth anniversary 
has laid out a beautiful entertainment for 
the evening. The success of the anniver- 
sary now depends on the individual efforts 
of the members who take part in it. To all 
friends at school and to those living at a 
distance we extend a cordial invitation to 
be present in the College Chapel, April 
6th, at our anniversary exercises. 

Our work so far has been encouraging ; 
every member seems to take active part 
in the work. The literary performance 
had to be neglected a few weeks ago, ow- 
ing to the fact that we had an amount of 
snow on the ground and the bpys had to 

go sleighing with their best , but the 

programmes, and especially the debates, 
have been ably rendered and contested. 
The interest in the musical part of the 
programme for some time has declined, 
but by the arrival of additional musical 
force, in the form of sheet music, we may 
hope that in the near future the boys will 
bring their violins to the hall. 

There has been of late a generous 
rivalry among the members in preparing 
the best productions, and thus a stimulus 
has been created that will bring good 
results. 

We look forward hopeful of excellent 
results from our united efforts during this 
year. , 

Clionian Literary Society. 



Virtnte et Fide. 

Society work has been moving along 
nicely since the beginning of the term, 
and especially during the last few weeks 
there seemed to be an unusual interest 
manifested. Our critic, who has been un- 
usually sad during the term, has suddenly 
grown quite happy again. 

The Clios are anticipating two pleasant 
joint sessions, one with the Philos, Febru- 
ary 16th ; the other with the Kalos, March 
2d. These sessions have always been en- 
joyed by our society and regarded as one 
of the pleasant features of society work. 
A very interesting programme has been 
prepared for the former. 

The dramatic entertainment given by 
the society February 3d was, financially, 
a success. We take this opportunity to 



thank the gentlemen for their kind assist- 
ance in arranging the stage, etc. 

Messrs. Kindt and Mayer visited so 
ciety January 26th. We are always glad 
to welcome visitors, and to know people 
are interested in our work. 

Miss Edith Sherrick, who was a member 
of society during her two years at L. T. 
C, has' entered Otterbein University, 
Miss Sherrick was always an active 
worker, and, although we are sorry to lose 
her, we wish her great success in all her 
undertakings. 



Our Alumni. 



'87, Dr. Gr. R. Shenk, Reading, Pa., is 
lying seriously ill with typhoid fever. We 
trust he may speedily recover to resume 
his duties as practicing physician. 

'79, Miss Emma L. Landis has beei 
appointed to deliver the annual address 
before the conference branch of the Wo- 
man's Missionary Societ} r of Maryland 
Conference. 

'91, Rev. G. L. Shaffer has completed 
the building of the United Brethren Chapel 
at Pottstown, Pa., and the dedicatory ser- 
vices were held last Sabbath. This is one 
of the neatest chapels in the conference, 
and Mr. Shaffer deserves great credit for 
so successfully prosecuting the work 
suddenly laid down by the late Rev. J. 
Baltzell. 

'78, D. D. Keedy, Keedysville, Md, 
made a short visit to the seat of his Alma 
Mater on January 25th. He attended the 
services on the Day of Prayer for Colleges 
and gave us a short talk. We all appre- 
ciated his kind words. 

'80, V. Kline Fisher is the President o 
a flourishiug Y. P. C. W. at Berne, Pa 
Our Alumni are generally active in Chris 
tian work when thev are out in the wort 
of life. 

'82, Mrs. Ella M. Smith Light recentl. 
served on a committee to examine tb< 
candidates for graduation in the depart 
ment of music. She expressed herself* 
highly pleased with the proficiency of tb 
applicants. 

'89, Rev. A. A. Long, Columbia, Pa., 
having in progress a very interesting # 
vival of religion ; about a hundred or ov6 
have professed conversion, and many ha? 1 
been added to the church. 

'90, Rev. E. S. Bowman, Greencastle,' 1 
delivering a series of sermons to I 
young people of that place. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



27 



ust- 

so. 

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>ple 

iber 
. V. 
sity, 
tive 
lose 
her 



., is 
We 
urne 



jeeii 
ves- 
Wo. 
land 

eted 
ape! 
ser- 
one 

;nce, 

t fO! 

k 
v.J, 

Md., 
vim; 
1 the 
eges 
litre 

nt oi 
,Pi 
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wort 

■nth 
tli' 
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,le,i 
, tli> 



The Novelty Sociable. 

On the morning of January 19th the 
students were rendered happ}- by the an- 
nouncement from the rostrum after chapel 
exercises that the lacly members of the 
faculty would give a Novelty Sociable on 
the following evening at the ladies' hall. 
Soon after seven o'clock the male students 
began to arrive at the ladies' hall, where 
they were delightfiill}' entertained and 
gladdened by pleasant smiles until all the 
gentlemen were present. Then the novel 
features of the occasion were disclosed. 

Most prominent among these were the 
"peanut hunt" and the " potatoe race." 
The Novelty Sociable was surety a most 
appropriate name for the evening's sport ; 
for, had a disinterested spectator been 
favored with the privilege of witnessing 
these jolly students, hurrying to and fro, 
each bent upon securing the greatest 
number of peanuts, or the vigorous efforts 
they made to carry singly the greatest 
number of potatoes to the place of deposit, 
he certainly would have come to the con- 
clusion that something out of the ordinal- 
course of events was taking place. 

Beautiful prizes were received by the 
winners in each of these exciting contests. 

These exercises being concluded, re- 
freshments were served and the students 
separated highly pleased with the even- 
ing's entertainment. 



Dramatic Entertainment. 

On Saturday evening, February 3d, the 
CHonian Literary Societ}' gave a drama- 
tic entertainment in the College Chapel, 
presenting the comedy " Slighted Treas- 
ures, ' and the buslesque musical produc- 
tion " The Sweet Family." 

In the former the Misses Fortenbaugh 
and Pennypacker, as the haughty society 
prls, were very entertaining and appeared 
to advantage in charming evening gowns, 
captivating the audience 'bv their graceful 
maimer. Miss Wilson was an ideal love- 
Sl ek maiden, rendering her lines with a 
realism that showed marked dramatic 
ability. Miss Bowman, who took the 
soubrette part of "Susan," the maid, 
made a decided hit bv reading a love 
mer S ome eight or ten yards in length. 

e has a natural stage presence, and 
snows great talent for acting. 

Ihe Sweet Family," introduced by 
h ^a Sweet," and consisting of "Ma" and 
seven talented, Accomplished and 



good-looking daughters, were greeted 
with storms of applause, which onby 
subsided at brief intervals throughout the 
entire performance, the whole being very 
laughable indeed. 

The character "Ma Sweet, a lone relic," 
was very ably portrayed by Miss Albertson, 
who appeared as an elderly woman, in an 
old-fashioned costume, the most import- 
ant detail of which were the green sleeves. 
She rendered the poem, " The City Choir," 
in a very artistic manner. 

Miss Gingrich, as " Arminty Ann," 
sang a solo, " Roll on, Silver Moon," that 
elicited much applause, and she then ren- 
dered " Comin thro' the Rye " in a feeling 
manner. 

Miss Fortenbaugh, as " Bets}^ Belindy, 
the delicate one," did admirabby as the 
female lecturer. 

Misses Richard and Klinedinst, as 
" Caroline Cordelia " and " Dorothy Deli- 
lah," were a very talented and healthy- 
looking pair of twins. 

Miss Saylor, as "Elizabeth Eliza, the 
attractive one," delivered " Marco Bozzar- 
is " in a very dramatic manner. 

Miss Stehman, " the aesthetic one," 
etherwise known as " Frances Fedoiy," 
carried an exquisite boqquet of flowers, 
presented to her by a "nice young man." 
She recited " Thou hast learned to love 
another " in a touching way. 

Miss Bowman, as " Glorianna Gadabout, 
the giggler," was the life of the produc- 
tion, her cute sayings and droll and orig- 
inal acting as the babv of the " Sweet 
Family " were highly enjoyed by the audi- 
ence. 



Personals and Locals. 

Since our last issue several new students 
have enrolled. 

Mr. Samuel F. Huber, '94, will represent 
L. V. C.,at the Prohibition contest on the 
22d i nst. 

Miss Mellie Fortenbaugh, of York, Pa., 
was called home to attend the funeral of 
her grandmother. 

The Senior public, which will occur in 
March, promises to be " a feast of reason 
and flow of soul." 

The home of Rev. D. D. Keedy, north 
of the campus, has been sold to Mrs. 
Hagey, of College avenue. 

The Women's Missionary Society of 
East Pennsylvania Conference were re- 
cently entertained at the home of Rev. 
Spayd. 




28 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



The Teacher's Institute in South Ann- 
ville, on the evening of the 6th inst., was 
largely attended ancVespecially interesting. 

Mr. Henry Killinger, of Main street, 
whose tooth had festered, had an incision 
made on the left cheek and the bone 
scraped. He is improving nicely. 

The revival services, which have been in 
progress in our church since New Year, 
have been very well attended. Thus far 
there were forty-three conversions. 

H. Lenich Meyer, who has been prin- 
cipal of the schools at Dauphin, has 
tendered his resignation, to accept the 
principalship of schools in Independent 
district, Lebanon, Pa. 

The groundhog has won many friends 
among the students by the fulfillment of 
his promises. Since he saw his shadow, 
winter has been here in earnest, and the 
lads and lasses can skate and go* sleighing. 

The Pennsylvania Conference will con- 
vene at Shippensburg, Pa., on the 20th 
inst. ; the Virginia Conference, at 

, on the 26th inst., and the Maryland 
Conference, at Keedysville, Md., on 
March 8th. 

The concert to be given on the evening 
of the 22d inst., by the New York Ideal 
Concert Company, promises a grand treat. 
Miss Bowen is famous as a soprano 
soloist and whistler ; Miss Mecklem is the 
only lady saxophone soloist in America ; 
Mr. Mecklem is the leading harpist of 
New York city; and Miss Friderici is a 
charminsc elocutionist. 



Thoughts on Lebanon Yalley College. 

One of the chief actions of the late 
General Conference was to emphasize the 
paramount importance of our educational 
work as a church, and to put on foot some 
plan to enlist our people in this indispen- 
sable arm of the church. The bishops 
were especially required to give it their 
immediate attention. This trust they 
cheerfully accepted in the call of the 
Johnstown Convention. One of the re- 
quirements of that Convention was that 
the several educational institutions of the 
church at an early date call a meeting of 
all friends of these schools to put into 
practical operation the most feasible plans 
for their relief and advancement. In 
harmony with the foregoing the Facult}', 
Trustees and friends of L. Y. C. met 
January 10th. 

On our return from this meeting quite 



a number of brethren asked : " Well, what 
did you do for the College this time ?" Omj 
answer was invariably. " We did all we 
possibly could do." 

In June, 1892, we decided to raise in 
the Cooperating Conferences $25,000 in 
1000 shares of $25 each to be appor- 
tioned to the several conferences. Most 
of these conferences readily accepted their 
quota. But we had no agent to push the 
plan, and nothing was done. At the meet- 
ing of the Board in June, 1893, we passed 
a resolution that as soon as a man could 
be found who was a friend of the College 
who had ability and experience, and had 
given evidence of unquestioned fitness by 
previous success in soliciting funds, such 
a man should be elected to the agency' of 
the College. It was concluded that in the 
person of Rev. M. J. Mumma, of Hum- 
melstown, Pa., these requirements were 
combined, and Rev. Mumma was uuani 
mously elected January 10th, as the agent. 
In 1892 the Trustees purchased an addi- 
tional adjoining piece of ground; the 
money being raised at that meeting, the 
church was not asked to pay any of that 
$1500. We ask, what more can the Trus- 
tees do. Are these plans not feasible ; a 
not, which are. If these don't commend 
themselves to the church some Rev. will 
inscribe his name on the tablets of ever- 
lasting remembrance if he can produce 
something better. If the self-sacrificing 
devotion and responsibility of the direct 
management of the College is inefficient 
let it be known wherein it exists, and the 
Trustees will surely rise to its correction, 
If the patient and toiling Faculty who are 
in arrears in their compensation are not 
the proper persons, or any one of them; 
from any cause, do not fairly represent 
the institution, let the hero come forward 
and establish such fact, and the Board will 
be unfaithful to its high trust if it dont 
remed}- the evil. But until then it is the 
bounden duty of every Presiding Elder, 
and every preacher and every member 0^ 
the church to assist the work of the Col 
lege by words of charity and kindness; 
and by gifts large or small, as the Lord 
has prospered. When the agent, Re*i 
Mumma, comes round he will solicit small 
sums and large sums. He will look after 
donations and bequests. He will seek 
induce young men and women to enter 
College preparatory to their life work. He 
will recommend the College by the grand 
and good work it has already done. $4 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



29 



w ill call your attention to some of the 
bright lights that have gone out from 
Lebanon Valley College, some of whom 
we know and love to honor. 

But that is not all. He will hold up 
the Gospel banner from your pulpits if 
permitted and bear the news of salvation 
to the boys and girls in your homes and 
firesides. What kind of a reception will 
he have. Will he feel welcome in our 
churches and our homes. Will we do this 
in behalf of our boys and girls, ia behalf 
of our only Christian college. Surel3 r 
less than this will be beneath our high 
privilege and duty. 

S. W. Clippinger. 



Improvement in the Department of 
Music. 

For some time past the Principal of the 
Music Department, Miss Carrie M. Flint, 
has been considering methods whereby 
the standard of the music course could be 
raised. The outcome is a system of musi- 
cal examinations inaugurated by Miss 
Flint. The first one was held Wednesdaj^, 
January 24th, the examining committee 
being Mrs. S. P. Light, Miss Flint and 
Miss Albertson. Those who passed suc- 
cessfully the recent examination are mereby 
candidates for graduation, there being two 
more examinations before June. 

It is to be hoped that their work during 
the rest of the year may result in the 
graduating of a class of music students 
who will be a credit to Miss Flint's un- 
tiring energy and devotion to the interests 
of the College. 



A Normal Class. 

The necessary arrangements have again 
been made by the authorities of the Col- 
lege to organize a Normal Class on the 
first Monday in April next and to con- 
tmue the work for ten successive weeks. 
While instruction will be given in all the 
branches named on the teacher's certifi- 
cate, Prof. Shott will give special atten- 
tion to instruction in pedagogy, and will 
therefore organize two classes, one for 
elementary work and another for those 
m ore advanced ; and Miss Albertson, a 
trained elocutionist, will take charge of a 
class in reading and elocution for special 
tutu. This we regard a rare opportunity. 

Hon. Henrv Houck, Deputy State Su- 
perintendent of our Public Schools, and 



others will give lectures on methods of 
instruction, etc. Full particulars may be 
obtained by addressing the President. 



America Leads the World. 

The Boston Globe went off on high ke} r 
after the Vigilant beat the Valkyrie in 
the great yacht race, delivering itself in 
part as follows : 

The United States is a big nation — a 
nation of big sportsmen, big inventors, 
big products, big natural wonders, every- 
thing except big heads. The American 
people can always get its hat on after 10 
a. m. 

Our World's Fair has beaten the 
world's record in magnitude, magnificence 
and success. The Paris Exposition with 
all its glitter and glare has been cast into 
the shade. Think of it, ponder it well — 
$30,000,000 spent to create the White City 
in Chicago, and am attendance on a single 
day of 700,000 visitors who paid admis- 
sion fees at the box offices. 

The biggest cavern in the world is the 
Mammoth Cave in Kentuck}-. The sub- 
terranean river within contains blind fish, 
which some day may be sent to the Per- 
kins Institute in South Boston to learn 
to read from raised letters. 

The biggest trees in the world are the 
mammoth trees of California. One of a 
grove in Tulare county, according to 
measurements made by the State Geologi- 
cal Survey, was shown to be 276 feet in 
height, 108 feet in circumference at the 
base and 70 feet at a point 12 feet above 
ground. Some of the trees are 376 feet 
high and 34 feet in diameter. Some of 
the largest that have been felled indicate 
an age of from 2,000 to 2,500 years. 

No other nation has within its borders 
a cataract like that which thunders at 
Niagara. As a bit of scenery it is unsur- 
passed, and in this practical age the tor- 
rent of water may be yet harnessed to 
drive our mills and light our cities. 

The Yellowstone National Park is the 
grandest museum of mineralogical curi- 
osities to be found anywhere on earth. It 
is a lofty plateau 8,000 feet above the sea, 
covered with dense forests of Douglass 
spruce and yellow pine, and broken by 
isolated groups of mountains. The whole 
region is overlaid with lava and dotted 
with geysers and hot springs, which burst 
forth on nearly every square mile, in the 
woods and along the peaks, and even boil- 



30 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. ♦ 



ing up in the lakes. These are the largest 
geysers in the world, exceeding those of 
Iceland or New Zealand, and their variet}' 
of action, character and power is wonder- 
fully interesting. 

The United States is entangled in some 
700,000 miles of telegraph wires, and the 
people thereof send more than 7,000,000 
messages annually. ISTo other country ap- 
proaches these figures. 

Locomotives scream along over miles 
and miles of railroad, which are dupli- 
cated nowhere beyond our shores. In 
1883 the tracks extended 125,162 miles, 
and they have been extending ever since. 

Our Mississippi river and its tributa- 
ries — 20,221 miles of navigable waters — 
put to blush even the mighty and lengthy 
Amazon. 

The queen of the suspension bridges is 
that which spans the East river at New 
York — length of the main span, 1,595 
feet; entire length of buidge, 5,980 feet. 

Where else can you find such common 
schools with 12,697,196 pupils enrolled, 
and supported at an expense of $140,277,- 
484? 

Where else can you find such public li- 
braries and magnificent public buildings 
so numerous ? 

We lead the world in manufactures. 
Taking the statistics of 1888 — which hap- 
pen to be at hand — we manufactured 
goods valued at $7,215,000,000, almost 
twice the product of the factories of Great 
Britain, our nearest competitor. 

We lead the world in the production of 
gold and silver. 

We more than half supply the cotton 
markets of both hemispheres. 

You know we can raise wheat and corn 
and such like. Even our gubernatorial 
candidates do a little farming. 

We lead the world with a volunteer 
militia — who will have peace even if they 
have to fight for it — with a total enlist- 
ment of 101,891 men. But that isn't all ; 
we have 9,760,156 citizens unorganized, 
but available to swell the ranks whenever 
occasion requires. Shoo fly ! 

Our Washington monument, that majes- 
tic white obelisk which rises 555 feet 
above ground, is the loftiest piece of 
masonary ever constructed,' surpassing 
even the Great Pyramid, Cologne and 
Antwerp Cathedrals, and St. Peter's. 

We have the largest display of original 
aborigines. 

No inventors ever lived whose fame will 



sui'vive the fame of Whitney, who con- 
ceived the cotton gin ; Edison and Bell 
and Morse, who have subjugated elec- 
tricit} r ; Howe, who built the sewing ma- 
chine; Fulton, who made steam navigation 
possible. 

But the grandest achievement of the 
American nation, more beautiful than na. 
ture's scenery, more ingenious than the 
inventor, more necessary to our happiness 
and well being than good crops, higher in 
our estimation than anj* monument, is^ 
'The American Woman. 

Facts and figures might be multiplied, 
but this much furnishes sufficient cause: 
for Uncle Sam to pat his own back in ap« 
probation to himself to-day. 



Man wants but little here below, 

Is a sentiment we love ; 
And judging by his conduct here 

He won't have much above. — Ex. 



An examination in the public schools; 
Professor to pupil : " In which battle was 
Gustavus Adolphus killed ?" Pupil, after 
reflection : " I think it was in his last 
battle." — New York Tribune. 



$10 and $20, Genuine Confederate Bills 
9 only five cents each ; $50 and $100 bills 
10 cents each ; 25c and 50c shinplasters 1C| 
cents each ; $1 and $2 bills 25 cents each. Sent 
securely sealed on receipt of price. Address, 
Chas. D. Barker, 90 S. Forsyth St.. At 
lanta, Ga. 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 

OPPO. COOK COUNTY HOSPITAL, CHICAGO, ILL. > \ 

The Winter Term begins September. 1894, and ends April, 
1895. Total fees $105 each Winter Term, and a laboratory 
deposit which is returnable. Four annual graded courses, 
with advanced standing for graduates In Pharmacy aud Uni- 
versity preparatory courses prior to the study of Medicine. 
Clinical and laboratory facilities unsurpassed. 
For annual circular of information, apply to 

W. E. QUINE, M D., 

Pres. cf the Faculty, 1 
813 WEST HARBISON ST. 

SMITH & CO., Ltd, 

Engravers and Stationers, 

1022 WALNUT STREET, 

Philadelphia* 



$5 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



31 



er 

LSt 



lis 
lis 
10 
■lit 



1UMBERLAND VALLEY RAILROAD. 
TIMETABLE— Oct. 1, 1893. 



Down Trains. 



Lv. Winchester 

" Martinsburg . 

' Hagerstown.... 

" Greencastle 

" Chambersburg 

" Shippensburg.. 

" Newville 

" Carlisle 718 

" Mechanicsburg | 7 42 

Ar. Dillsburg 

" Harrisburg 



C'l,g 
Acc. 



A. M. 



6 in 

6 32 
6 53 



Ky'e 
Exp 



A. M. 

6 15 
700 

7 40 

8 09 
8 30 

8 55 
915 

9 40 
10 04 



Philadelphia.. 

New York 

Baltimore 



11 25 
2 03 
11 IS 

A. M. 



1 25 
4 03 
3 10 

P. M. 



Mr'g Day Ev'g 
Mail Exp Mail 



No. 4 No. 6 No. 8 



11 25 

11 48 

12 08 
12 30 
12 50 

1 15 
1 40 



in <tu -ll" 

1 25 I 650 
4 03 I 9 38 
3 10 6 45 

P. M. P. M. 



P. M. 

2 30 

3 20 

4 10 

4 36 

5 00 
5 30 

5 51 

6 17 
6 43 



7 05 

11 15 

3 50 
10 40 



N'gt 
Exp 

No. 10 

P. M. 

3 20 

4 50 
7 10 

7 36 

8 00 
8 16 

8 53 
920 

9 43 

10 05 
A. M. 
4 30 
7 33 
6 20 
AM. 



Additional trains will leave Carlisle daily except Sunday at 
5:55 a. m., 7:68 a. m., 3:40 p. m., stopping at all intermediate 
stations, arriving at Harrisburg at 6:40 a. m., 8:03 a. m., 4:30 
p. m. 

Evening Mail runs daily between Harrisburg and Cham 
bersburg. 



Dp Tbains. 



Lv. Baltimore . 
" New York . 



" Harrisburg 

" Dillsburg 

" Mechanicsburg . 

" Carlisle 

" Newville 

" Shippensburg.... 

" Chambersburg.. 

" Greencastle 

" Hagerstown 

" Martinsburg 

Ar. Winchester 



Win 


Me's 


Hag 


Ev'g 


C'bg 


N. O. 


Acc. 


Exp 


Acc. 


Mail 


Acc. 


Exp- 


No. 1 


No. 3 


No. 5 


No. 7 


No.17 


No. 9 


P. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


11 40 


445 


853 


11 20 


215 


4 23 


800 


12 15 




9 00 


200 


2 06 


11 20 


4 30 


8 50 


1150 


220 


4 30 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


4 40 


7 53 


12 40 


340 


520 


8 00 


5 03 


8 13 


1 03 


4 01 


5 41 


820 


5 30 


8 36 


1 29 


4 25 


6 05 


8 44 


5 55 


900 


1 52 


4 55 


6 36 


9 08 


6 15 


9 21 


213 


5 10 


6 57 


9 29 


6 40 


9 43 


235 


535 


720 


9 50 


7 02 


10 04 


3 01 


550 




10 12 


725 


10 27 


325 


6 18 




10 35 


9 30 


11 12 




7 02 






1100 


12 00 




7 50 






A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 



Additional trains will leave Harrisburg daily except Sunday 
at 10:35 a. m.. 10:45 p. m., arriving at Carlisle at 11:20 a.m., 
11:30 p. m., stopping at all intermediate stations ; additional 
train will leave Hagerstown at 8:00 a. m., arriving at 11:00 
"SwH st °PP' n g at all intermediate stations. 

Pullman PalaceSleepingCars between Hagerstown and New 
xprk on Keystone Express and Night Express east, and on 

d^P Ex Press and New Orleans Express west. 

Pullman Sleeping Cars on Night Express and New Orleans 
express between Philadelphia and N» w Orleans. 

T F J .1 ^ lsh t0 advertise anything anywhere at any time, 
New York P ' EOWELL & Co -> No - 10 Spruce Street, 

■pVERV one in need if information on the subject of ad- 
ArtJS.- isi " K wiu <l0 wel1 to obtain a copy of "Book for 
nnirt ^ &ers \ ' m n:, K es > nrice oue dollar. Mailed, postage 
thi \ . ™celpt of price. Contains a careful compilation from 
aMrf?. er l can Newspaper Directory of all the best papers 
ami o „ J9, ,,rnal8 i K'ves the circulation rating of every one, 
np«o«?i (leaI " f information about rates«ind other matters 
gsiiaiuiiiK to the business of advertising. Address KOW- 
York. ADVEKT l«INO BUREAU, 10 Spruce Street, New 

ROOFING. 

kUM^LASTIC ROOFING FELT costs 
*y $2.00 per ioo square feet. Makes a 
rn™° of for y ears and anyone can put it on. 
^UM-FLASTIC PAINT costs only 6o cents 
Oni ga l* \ n bbl - lots ' or for 5-gal. tubs, 

ww^, rk red - win sto P leaks in tin or iron 
r oois that will last for years. TRY IT. 

nd stamp for samples and full particulars. 

o Q GUM ELASTIC ROOFING CO. 
•sy and 41 W. Broadway, New York. 
**OCAI, AGENTS WANTED. 



W. F. BECKER. J. P. BKVGGEK. 

THE 5fc-t<-— 

Eastern Book Store, 

315 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

Special Hates to Students. 

W Second-Hand School Books a Specialty. 

WRITE FOR PRICES. 



J- 



L. SAYLOR'S SONS, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

CARRIAGES, 

LIGHT BUGGIES, PONY PHAETONS, ETC. 
STRICTLY FIRST CLASS. 

Shops Opposite Eagle Hotel, ANNVILLE, PA 

B. MARSHALL, M. D., 



E. 

No, 34 East Main Street, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

ISAAC MANN & SON, 

LARGEST CLOTHIERS, 

834 Cumberland Street, 

LEBANON, PA. 

THE BEST GOODS FOR THE LEAST MONET. 



T R. McCAULY, 




DAILY MEAT 


MARKET. 


GOOD MEAT. LOW PRICES. 


ANNVILLE. PA. 


JOHN TRUMP, 




J BOOT AND SHOE MAKER, 


ANNVILLE, 


PA. 



WS. SEABOLD, 
. DEALER IN 

Drugs, Medicines, Perfumery and Toilet Articles, 

No. 2 East Main St., Annville, Pa. 




CAN I OBTAIN A PATENT? For a 

prompt answer and an honest opinion, write to 
1UUNN *fc CO., who have had nearly fifty vears' 
experience in the patent business. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. A Handbook of In- 
formation concerning Patents and how to ob- 
tain them sent free. Also a catalogue of mechan- 
ical and scientific books sent free. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice in the Scientific American, and 
thus are brought widely before the public with- 
out cost to the inventor. This splendid paper, 
issued weekly, elegantly illustrated, has by far the 
largest circulation of any scientific work in the 
world. $3 a year. Sample copies sent free. 

Building Edition,. monthly, #2.50 a year. Single 
copies, 25 cents. Every number contains beau- 
tiful plates, in colors, and photographs of new 
houses, with plans, enabling builders to show the 
latest designs and secure contracts. Address 

MUNN & CO., Nkw York, 361 Broadway. 



32 

■YY ILLIAM KIBBLER, 
SHAVING AND HAIR DRESSING, 

Eagle Hotel Rarber Shop, Annville, Pa. 

A DAM B. HESS, 

II OFFICE AT THE HOTE L EAGLE. 

OMNIBUS TO ALL TRAINS. 

ANNVILLE. PA. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 

II you want to Buy a Hat right, and a ngbt Hat, or anything ii 
Men's Furnishings, 



j 



ACOB SARGENT, 
FASHIONABLE TAILOR, 

18 and 20 Main St., Annville, Pa. 



D' 



|RY GOODS, NOTIONS, GRO- 
CERIES, BOOTS and SHOES, 

—AND— 

GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS. 

J. 2S. SHOPE, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

SNOW FLAKE PRINTING HOUSE, 
A. C. M. HEISTER, Prop., 
FINE JOB PRINTING, 

35 S. White Oak Street - - Annville, Pa. 

WILLIAM WALTZ, 
FASHIONABLE 

HAIR CUTTING AND SHAVING SALOON, 

West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
H. H. KKEIDEK. JNO. E. HERB. 

KREIDER & CO., 
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

Hard & Soft Coal, Grain, Seeds Salt & Feed. 

Office : Railroad Street, near Depot, 
Telephone Connection. ANNVILLE, PA. 

THE BEST STOCK, THE LOWEST 
PRICES IN 

FURNITURE , j os E ^ a m7lle r ■ s. 

ANNVILIiK, PA. 

M. II. SHAUD, 

DEALER IN 

Gold Watches and Jewelry, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYS 
TERS AND CREAM. ANNTZILLE, PA. 

S. M. SHEIK'S BAKERY, 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

FRESH BREAD, CAKES AND ROLLS, 

One Door West Penn'a House, Annville. 
S. 33. "VV^OTXriEIES., 

— Headquarters tf or -<^-— 
GROCERIES, CONFECTIONERIES 

OYSTERS, FRUITS AND NUTS. 
Restaurant Attached. Meals at All Hours 

12 West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



Successors to RAITT & CO., 
Eighth and Cumber/and Sts., Lebanon, Pa 

Kinpart^ & SfcexUs 

ANNVILLE, PA., 

Dealers in Dry Goods, Notions 

and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home-made, 
Ingrain and Brussels Carpets. You buy Cheaper 
from us than away from home, and have a large 
stock to select from. 



THE 

U. B. MUTUAL AID SOCIETY 

OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

HOME OFFICE, LEBANON, PENNA. 

Chartered by the State Legislature, March 11, 1 
Positive amounts guaranteed and claims paid in 

Benefits of $1000 insurance secured for $8.00. 
Reciprocal Circle Insurance,new and very popular. 

Invested Assets ^?v?2?m 

Contingent Assets v , 1 , 6 .'^! 

Assessment Basis %%%SI 

Death Losses Paid 6,774,123.01 

THE PLAN. 

The payment of EIGHT DOLLARS on application 
FIVE DOLLARS annually for fQur years, and there- 
after TWO DOLLARS annually during life, witu 
pko rata mortality assessments for each death of a 
member insured for $1000, is as follows: 



Age. 


Ass't 


Age. 


ASS'MT 


Age. 


Ass'mt 


20 


65 


30 


75 


40 


90 


21 


66 


31 


77 


41 


92 


22 


67 


32 


79 


42 


94 


23 


68 


88 


81 


43 


96 


24 


69 


34 


83 


44 


98 


25 


70 


35 


85 


45 


1 OK 


26 


71 


36 


86 


46 


1 06 


27 


72 


37 


87 


47 


1 12 


28 


73 


38 


88 


48 


1 18 


29 


74 


39 


89 


49 


1 24 



Age. 



Assm't 



1 30 
1 40 
1 59 
1 60 
1 70 
1 80 
1 92 



This will entitle a member to a certificate of $ 
to be paid after death to the legal beneficiary, when 
ever such death may occur. 

Reliable Agents Wanted Everywhere. 



F. W. FROST, 
BOOK BINDER AND BLANK BOOK 
MANUFACTURER, 

783 Cumberland St., - - Lebanon, P» 



Volume VII. 



Number 3. 



THE 



College Forum. 



MARCH, 1894. 



. + CONTENTS : •* . 



Reading 33-35 

Civil Service Reform 35, 36 

"The Cotter's Saturday Night" 36, 37 

Editorials 38-40 

Personals and Locals 41, 42 

College Directory 43 

Philokosmian Literary Society 43, 44 



Kalozeteau Literary Society. 
Clionian Literary Society. . . . 

Our Alumni 

Only the Stars and Stripes . . 

Exchanges 

Advertisements .! '. 



PAGK 

....44 
.44, 45 
. . . .45 
.45, 46 
....46 
.46-4g 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



HARRY LIGHT, 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

22 EAST MAIN ST., ANNVILLE, PA. 



Our shelves are constantly filled with 
New, Second-Hand and Shelf-Worn 



Together with a Complete Assortment of ° 



STATIONERY, w 

d Wall Paper and Window Shades, s 



n 



A Selected Stock of the 

LATEST STYLES OF WALL PAPER 

AND 

DECORATIONS. 



w 
o 
o 

CO 



SCHOOL AND COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS A SPECIALTY. 
C- SMITH, 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 



L 



INCLUDING 
NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 
OLD BOOKS. NEW BOOKS. 

Cheapest place in the Lebanon Valley to buy your 
Books. -8®- New and Old Hooks Bought, 
Sold and Exchanged. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY, 

SILVER PL ATE D W A BE, 

Spectacles a Specialty, 



Fitted to any age, In Gold 
S ilver, Etc 



PERFECT FOCUS AND FIT GUARANTEED. 

ISAAC WOLF, 
'S 




ONE PRICE ONLY . 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
838 CUMBERLAND STREET. 

Please Mention "The College Forum." 



Susan's Truthful Words. 

"Said Susan Grey, one b 

spring day, 
iOf floral books that c 

to me, 
There's none which help 

to decide, 
As well as Jas. Vick's Fl 
Guide, 

Upon the different flowers, 
With which to fill my fragrant bowers 
Its charming leaves are always full, 
Of flowers new and flowers old ; 
As Aster and Anemone, 
Or the sweet-scented Marigold. 
So many others could be named, 
Each one of which has been far-famed 
Indeed no other book need hope, 
In excellence with this to cope." 
Ten cents will bring it to your door, 
From Jas. Tick's Sons, of Rochester. 



The ten cents may be dedueted from you 
first order. 

JAS. VICK'S SONS, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



When you need Books or Stationery of any kin 
correspond with or call on us. By so doing you wi 
secure the Best Goods at the most Favorable Trice 

Stock always New and Fresh. Assortment Lar 
Prices the Lowest. Whether you intend to buy 
or $25.00 worth, it will pay you to call to see us. 

Bagster's and Oxford Teachers' Bibles a Spec! 
We carry in stock the publications of the 
Publishing House, such as Otterbein Hymn 
Hymns of the Sanctuary, the Books used in t 
three years' course of study, S. S. Music Books. 

AGKNTS WANTED to sell the best and 
popular Lord's Prayer published. Send 75 cents 
sample copy, worth $2.00. Address plainly 

GUIDES, & BROTHER, 

PUBLISHERS OF 




ru 

Photograph Family Records, Etc., Etc., 

YORK, PA. 



■ 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Vol. VII. No. 3. 



ANNVILLE, PA., MARCH, 1894. 



Whole No. 69. 



Reading. 

BY PROF. J. A. M 'DERM AD, A. M. 

It was a celebrated thought of Talley- 
rand, the great French diplomat, that 
" language is a medium for the concealing 
of thought." This may be true in some 
phases and on some occasions in which 
language is employed, but we do not be- 
lieve it to be true as a rule with respect 
to the language used in books. It is here 
if anywhere, that an author gives us his 
best or his worst thoughts in their purest 
and most unequivocal form. The motives 
which might in some cases operate toward 
a tendency to conceal thought are not 
here present. A book is a voluntary and 
deliberate creation of its author's mind, 
and intended, if read, to cause its author 
and his theories to be known and esti- 
mated by other minds and measured in 
comparison with other theories and beliefs. 

In giving a book to the public the au- 
thor virtually makes it an exponent of 
his own nature and a revelation of his 
own mental genius and character. A 
book is therefore, in a certain sense, a liv- 
ing thing. It is stamped with the au- 
thor's own life, and bears the image of his 
genius, culture, spirit and character; and 
the fact that it is capable to stir the emo- 
tions of other hearts, quicken the -genius 
°f other minds and arouse the energies of 
other lives shows that it bears the impress 
of personality and is the embodiment of 
i living principle of thought. Dr. Gordy, 
W speaking of the importance of the work 
m which the student is engaged, says : 
Let him know, make him feel that the 
Knowledge which he can get so easil}* at 
Sc hool is the piled up life of some of the 
greatest and noblest men of the race. * * 
boy who can read sees not merely 
Paper with letters upon it, but the very 
nnnd of the man whose thoughts are 
Materialized upon it." 



In this sense it may truly be said that 
there are no dead languages. A language 
that contains the living thoughts of men 
of genius must continue to live in the 
thoughts, feelings and sentiments of other 
minds wherever and whenever it is read. 
Wherever there is a mind that is capable 
and permitted to understand and peruse 
the great ■ and masterby works of men of 
genius, even of the so-called dead lan- 
guages, their might}* thoughts will live to 
quicken the energies and inspire the 
genius of other minds' throughout the 
progress of the ages. Such works as 
those of Homer, JEschylus, Sophocles, 
Plato, Virgil, Cicero and Dante cannot 
die, but must continue to live wherever 
there is a soul to thrill with the fervor of 
genius or a mind to burn with the flame 
of intelligence. They represent the very 
highest productions of human power and 
embody the strongest sentiments, the 
deepest experiences and loftiest emotions 
of the human spirit ; and it may with 
truth be said of them that the}' belong 
not to one age or people, but live through 
all life and extend through all extent. 
They describe the universal experiences 
and feelings of human it}*, and represent 
human character in all its attitudes and 
prerogatives, with all its passions, sym- 
pathies and emotions and under the high- 
est phases of its cumulative intensity. 

The above facts being true in regard to 
authorship, the act and exercise of reading 
is one of no mean or secondary import- 
ance, but is one of the highest arts and 
greatest privileges which it is permitted 
to an intelligent person to cultivate. This 
must necessarily be so because in books 
we come in contact with intelligence of . 
all kinds and subjects of every order of 
description which lies in the sphere of 
rational discovery or in the realm of 
practical advantage. It is by means of 
reading that we are put into direct com- 



34 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



munication with the concurrent investi- 
gation and discovery of the day, as well 
as with the transmitted and treasured 
learning of past ages, and thus we are 
able to ascertain in a short time what 
otherwise we would never learn at all, or 
at best spend years in seai-ching for. 
Reading, therefore, considered in its 
effects, is much more a mental than a 
physical process. In it we hold converse 
with our author's mind, are transported 
into his mental atmosphere, and partake 
for the time being of his experiences, 
preferences and beliefs. We 3 T ield to the 
author a place in our feelings, attention and 
expectation, and submit to him to lead 
us to some coveted field of information, 
desire and enjoj^ment. To read, therefore, 
is a much more important exercise than 
many people imagine, and leads to results 
far more lasting than we at first believe. 
It is or should be more than simply the 
passing of an hour or the gratification of 
a capricious fancy ; it is an employment 
which may leave behind the most power- 
ful impression for good, or which may 
reduce the soul to utter barrenness and 
waste, and even scathe it as with a devour- 
ing fire. To read an author is, however, 
more than to hold converse with his mind 
in its ordinaiy state. For, by the act of 
writing the mind is raised to its highest 
pitch of thought and feeling, and as Dr. 
Porter says : " It condenses, as it were, 
and intensifies whatever is good into 
what is doubly good, whatever is bad 
into what is doubly bad. It is deliberate. 
It does not proceed in haste. If a fact is 
to be stated it may be examined with care 
and its truth established. If an opinion 
is to be expressed it may be looked at 
from every side and in all its relations." 
We may confer with Bacon, who drops 
those practical observations and useful 
maxims which meet a response in the in- 
dividual life and character of every reader, 
or who with the might of his reason 
transports us to that height of exper- 
imental research from which we discern 
fields of vision which no eye before his 
had ever explored, and from which it is 
possible for the mind in its prophetic 
grasp to apprehend the possibilities of 
things unseen. Shakespeare opens up to 
us the worlds of imagination and the 
workings of the human heart. He is the 
poet of universal nature, the actual and 
the possible, the real and the ideal. 
Never did a poet have such universal and 



indomitable grasp of all material and 
psychical realities as Shakespeare. In 
his dramas we see human nature in all the 
infinite variety of its passions, percep- 
tions, experiences and possibilities, and 
under all conditions of its activit}*- and 
progress ; yet in every character there is 
an intense reality, a distinct personality ! 
and individualism, which makes it a true 
creation. 

Or we may take Scott, "the magician 
of the North," who gives us scenes of 
real life as they occur in histoiy, and the 
practical observations of everyday life. 
In his creations we get acquainted with 
the characters of the age and nation in! 
which he lived. He does not revel so 
much in the ideal and speculative as in] 
the historical and practical, though it is 
true that some of his characters are bor- 
rowed from imagination as well as from 
histoiy. Shaw says of him: "His senti-i 
ments are invariably pure, manly and ele- 
vated; and the spirit of the true gentle- j 
man is seen as clearly in his deep sym-1 
pathy with the virtues of the poor and] 
humble as in the kingly fervor with which 
he paints the loftier feelings of the edu- 
cated classes." 

Dickens, Hawthorne and George EM 
iot excel especially in painting the pasn 
sions and emotions of their subjects. In 
their sketches we catch sight of the inw 
pulses and experiences which govern 
their characters, and which are convoked 
to Avork out their fortunes and evolve 
their destiny. In them we have a never-] 
failing source of interest in the study OH 
personal peculiarities and individual traits.] 
Individual life is seen in its various phases! 
and propensities, and under the inevitable 1 
stress of its successes and failures, its am- 
bitions and conflicts, its achievements 
and hopes. Their sketches are not sffl 
lofty as those of Shakespear or Scott, butj 
are exactly on the level of ordinary e» 
perience and practical reality, and are 
thus marked by those vital touches and 
individual qualities which are so effective 
in giving to them all the coherency 01 
personal creations. We live and move, 
and breathe, as it were, in their midst; 
feel what they feel ; are swayed by the 
same emotions ; sufferings and anticipa- 
tions as characterize them ; we see intflj 
the inmost recesses of their very hearts, 
observe the workings of their spiritual 
conduct, and watch the gathering storm 
of passion by which their natures are 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



35 



tested. It is these facts and such as 
these that give to their writings a peculiar 
charm and fascination to readers of every 
class and every profession. Their char- 
acters are not ideal but real. They are 
true to nature, hut the nature is distinctly 
their own. They suffer and hate, love 
and admire, as it were, in our very pres- 
ence and derive much of their interest and 
attraction from the fact that they arouse 
our sympathies, our interest or our anti- 
pathy by the touches of nature which they 
contain, and which they are appointed to 
convey to the reader. Or we may take 
Milton, whose genius reaches a height of 
sublimity which is unattained by any un- 
inspired writer. Before his gaze the gates 
of heaven, 

" On golden hinges turning," 

swing open before our astonished view, 
and we are enraptured at the surpassing 
splendor of the scene, overwhelmed by the 
array of the angelic host, or confounded 
by the glimpse of the Uncreated and 
Eternal. Or, 

" On a sudden open fly 
With impetuous recoil and jarring sound 
The infernal doors," 

and the archangel ruined stands before us 
with his compeers, sublime in intellect, 
degraded by sin, scarred and seared by 
the curse, yet proud and unsubdued in 
their rebellious wills. 

Such being the effects and prerogatives 
of reading, the questions, What books 
shall I read? and, How shall I read them? 
become of corresponding importance. In 
the first place we reply, that not all books 
a re to be read in the same manner, be- 
cause not all are designed to secure the 
same end. Bacon says, " Some books are 
to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and 
some few to be chewed and digested; that 
Wj some books are to be read only in part, 
others to be read, but not curiously, and 
some few to be read wholly and with dili- 
gence and attention." 

(To be continued.) 



Civil Service Reform. 

When we consider the greatness of our 
government, the liberty it promises to its 
°-h° i tlle res P ect shown and the applause 
with 1 • ° ther nation s. we are thrilled 
wro patriotic P ride 5 but when we see the 
ourP and in j us tices in the politics of 
country, we are surprised that a gov- 



ernment can exist with so much corrup- 
tion in it. 

When power in politics is monopolized 
it opposes liberty and tends toward a 
condition like that which existed under 
the feudal system in England. 

The Constitution of the United States 
calls for a government in which each indi- 
vidual may have a part, and whenever the 
rights of the people are interfered with, 
the Constitution is violated and the plan 
of its founders is thwarted. They never 
intended that a few should have power 
over the will of the many, yet such is the 
case to-day, and our liberty is being lim- 
ited and is gradually vanishing from us. 

Although it is true that we have the 
privilege of voting for candidates, how 
much of a privilege, I would ask, have we 
in choosing nominees ? For, is it not true, 
the delegates who make up the national 
conventions are chosen by a political 
ring that work more for their own 
interest than that of a nation's ? How 
often is the will of the people voiced in 
the choice of a candidate? But what is 
to be done ? Are the people to stand still 
and see their liberty taken awa}^ and the 
fidelity of the founders of this Republic 
abused by the present corrupting in- 
fluences ? 

The time has come when there must be 
a reform — a reform that will not cut off a 
branch here and there, letting the trunk 
stand to send out shoots in greater num- 
ber than before, but one that will go 
down to the bottom and destroy ever} r 
root, fibre and all appearance of the old 
evil. 

During the days of Adams and Jeffer- 
son the safety of the government was as 
carefully guarded as was that of the 
household. The ballot-box was as sacred 
as the hearth, and the rights of the people 
were respected in ever}' issue. Such was 
the condition of affairs during the first 
quarter of a century, and not until the days 
of Andrew Jackson did the people suffer 
from political infamy nor writhe under 
the torture of the spoilsman's axe. Never 
was so great an injustice committed 
against American liberty as there was 
when from his throne Andrew Jackson 
proclaimed that " to the victor belongs 
the spoils." England had writhed under 
the scourge of this abominable evil until 
she could bear it no longer, and then put 
her foot upon the neck of the curse and 
crushed it out of existence ; and now she, 



36 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



with other nations, looks at us surprised 
that the greatness of our government can 
be maintained with such evils pressing 
upon it. After the time of Jackson this 
evil became greater as each succeeding 
magistrate came into power, and each 
went into office with a howling, frenzied 
mob of officeseekers at his heels. 

Men devote their whole time and energy 
to become skilled in the intrigues of polit- 
ical warfare, and those who do not edu- 
cate along this line are unable to cope 
with the wily, smooth tongue of the dema- 
gogue. They work for party without a 
thought of the country's good, and expect 
political fitness to take the place of effi- 
ciency. For this reason, good honest men 
are excluded from public service, and the 
tendency of our administration is to fill 
the positions with men whose only qualifi- 
cation is political influence. They are 
compelled to support the party or give up 
their position. They must contribute to 
the campaign or lose their influence. 
Love of country is swallowed up in love 
of party, and patriotism yields its place 
to destructive passion. No ballot-box 
reform will set matters right, for this has 
been tried. Fraud, forgery and bribery 
are still controlling our elections to-day, 
and men who are conscientious, men who 
try to serve God withdraw from politics 
and leave the field to wolfish packs of 
political schemers. 

These evils make a reform necessary, 
and to completely destroy the wrongs in 
elections and the wrongs in appointing, 
two reforms are needed — one that renders 
frauds at elections an impossibility, and 
one that reforms civil service, making 
competency alone a recommendation to 
government offies. The first destroys the 
power of chiefs to select political tools 
and compels them to refuse enticing re- 
wards. The second removes the tempta- 
tion to buy position and directs the 
energies into channels of usefulness. 

Civil service reform will destroy every 
evil which the spoils system has caused, 
and then can we look forward to a govern- 
ment unrivalled by any other on the globe 
because of its efficiency. Then will the 
200,000 public positions not be a tempta 
tion to commit wrong. They will no 
longer be a prize to a class of men who 
have made politics a profession. Merit 
will take the place of political fitness, and 
office holders will be retained as long as 
they prove satisfactory. 



Civil service reform makes an examina- 
tion necessary as a means to gain position 
without regard to party or politics, and 
if it is faithfully carried out we need have 
no fears for bad administration, because 
competent men will hold the offices of our 
government. Votes will be secured by 
merit and not by money, and the sound, 
unrestricted judgment will be expressed 
at the polls. Civil service reform means 
purity, patriotism, progress. It means 
equality, morality, virtue, and it means 
that the Republic shall continue to exist; 
that its institutions shall be strengthened 
and ennobled, and that its days of greatest 
glon? - are yet to come. 

Sheridan Garman, '96. 1 



"The Cotter's Saturday Night." 



FROM CLASS WORK. 

Robert Burns, the author of this poem, 
was the great poet of Scotland. He had 
frequently remarked to his brother that; 
he thought there was something pecit 
liarly venerable and beautiful in thfi 
phrase, " Let us worship God," when 
uttered by a pious, sober head of a family; 
To this sentiment the world is indebted 
for " Cotter's Saturday Night." 

It is supposed the character he hu 
portrayed as head of the family has all 
the characteristics of his own father.! 
The other characters are not taken from! 
his family, as none of them were out nj 
service. Burns' father worked hard and 
made a great many sacrifices, so that ha 
could rear his children himself and keep 
them at home until they could distinguish 
good from evil. 

In this poem Burns gives a true and 
vivid description of a pious laborer and: 
his family. It is fall; the wind blow! 
loud and day is near its close. The tired 
beasts are taken from the plough and the 
birds are seeking rest. The weary Cotter 
collects his tools and is thankful that tW 
morrow is Sunday, that he may have | 
day of quiet rest. If any class of people 
is thankful that the Lord has ordained 8 
d&y of rest it is the laboring class. 

His humble cottage stands in a lonely 
place sheltered by aged trees. As nfl 
comes in sight of it the children, waiting 
and watching for their father, run to meet 
him. His thrifty wife is a true help* 
mate, and has the hearthstone clean, and! 
with the youngest child on his knee, h ft 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



37 



ma- 
ion 
nid 

ave 
use 

our I 

by 
nd, 
sed 
ans 
ans 
ans 
1st; 
led 
est 



lad 
hat 
c li- 
the 
len 
ily, 
ted 



all 

ler, 
om 

in 
md 

he 



aid 
md 

iW9 

red 
the 
ter 
the 
3 a 
pie 
d ft 

eiy 

he 

ing 
eet 



soon forgets his cares and weariness in 
the joy of being with his loved ones and 
seeing how much they r care for him. 

Presently the older children who are 
out at service at different places come 
home. The oldest child, Jennie, adds her 
hard-earned wages if her parents are in 
need of anything. Such a daughter with 
such devotion to her parents could glad- 
den a monarch's heart. 

The brothers and sisters have a joyful 
meeting after being separated for the 
week, and have a very pleasant time tell- 
ing the news and fortunes of each since 
last they met. The devoted mother, ever 
busy, remodels the clothes for the chil- 
dren, while the father, when it is neces- 
sary, gives them kind adA T ice. He tells 
them to mind the commands of their 
masters and not to shirk duty. 

"And O ! be sure to fear the Lord aVway ! 

An' mind your duty duly, mom and night ! 
Lest in temptation's path ye go astray, 

Implore His counsel and assisting might ; 

They never sought in vain that sought the 
Lord aright !" 

Surely no father could give better 
advice than this, if only more would do it. 

The family 7 party is disturbed by a raj) 
at the door, but if Jennie's blushes and 
the bright sparkle of her e3'e can be taken 
as a sign the intruder is not an unwelcome 
one. She hurriedly tells her parents that 
it is a neighbor lad, who has come to 
escort her home. She welcomes him and 
brings him into the parlor, and the father 
enters into conversation with him. 

The author says he has paced much 
this weary mortal round, and experience 
bids him say : 

"If Heaven a draught of heavenly pleasure 
spare, 

9 lle cordial in this melancholy vale, 
lis when a youthful, loving, modest pair 
In other's arms breathe out the tender tale, 
beneath the milk-white thorn that scents the 
evening gale." 

They 7 now partake of their simple sup- 
Per, consisting of porridge. The mother, 
«i honor of the visitor, brings out the 
cheese, telling him it is a twelve-month 
old. 

After having eaten their cheerful sup- 
per they form a circle, and the father says, 

■Ut us worship God," and takes down 
1 e ol d family Bible, the rest becoming 
?Wy reverent. They chant their hymns 
h ° 0ur Creator, but they also tune their 
hearts, and that is far the noblest and 




most acceptable praise that can be ren- 
dered unto him. 

The Father reads from the Holy Book, 
perhaps about Christ, how 7 He had noth- 
ing on earth, not even where to lay 7 His 
head. After reading they kneel down 
and pray. He asks that God will grant 
that they may 7 all meet in the same way, 
without the absence of one, in Heaven, 
where their toiling and sighing will be 
over. How poor religion's pride, in the 
glory of art. compared to worship like 
this? We are more likely 7 to find true 
worship in some humble cottage like this 
than in the fine churches, where, perhaps, 
people go to see and be seen rather than 
to worship God. 

After their devotions are ended, the 
older children take their several way r s to 
their homes, while the younger ones retire 
to rest. 

When all is quiet the parents pay their 
secret homage, and ask that He wdio stills 
the raven's clamorous cry 7 , and without 
whose notice not one sparrow falls to the 
ground, will, in the wa} 7 His wisdom sees 
best, for them and their children provide. 
Above all, they 7 ask that Christ may reign 
supreme within their hearts. 

The older children certainly have a 
pleasant picture to carry with them to 
their different homes. One w 7 ould think 
there would not be much danger of their 
not obeying the commands of their mas- 
ters. 

From homes like these a country's best 
men are sent forth. Pope says, " An 
honest man's the noblest work of God," 
and he is more frequently found in the 
cottage than in the palace. 

The poet closes the poem with a prayer 
that Scotland's sons may be blest with 
health, peace and happiness, and that they 
maj 7 be kept from luxury 7 and may be a 
virtuous people to protect their country, 
and that God, who is the patriot's friend, 
may never desert his country. 

Emma Gingrich. 



Like flakes of snow that fall unper- 
ceived upon the earth, the seemingly un- 
perceived events of life succeed one 
another. As the snow gathers together, 
so are our habits formed. No single flake 
that is added to the pile produces a sensi- 
ble change ; no single action creates, how- 
ever it may exhibit, a man's character. — 
Jeremy Taylor. 



38 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



EDITORS. 

H. CLAY DEANBK, A. M., 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher. 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 

John H. Matsilles, '95. Ira E. Albert, '97. 

Ceorge H. Stein, '97. 



EXCHANGE EDITOR. 

D. S. E8HLEMAN, '94. 



AI-ITMM EDITOR. 
Prof. JohnE. Lehman, A. 



M. 



SOCIETY EDITORS. 

Clionian Society— Miss Estella Stehman. 
Philokosmian Society— Osoar BJ. Good, '94. 
Kalozetean Society— James F. Zug, '94. 



96, 



THE COLLEGE FORUM will be sent monthly for one 
school year on receipt of twenty-Are cents. Subscriptions 
received at any time. 

For terms of advertising, address the Publisher. 



Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as 
second-class mail matter. 

B&ttorlat, 

The Spring term of the College opens 
on the 26th in«t. The Normal Depart- 
ment will open on April 1st. 



Out of 3,500 newspaper clippings re- 
ferring to the late George W. Childs, only 
one had a mean thing to say about him. 



Subscribers changing their address or 
failing to receive any issue of the Forum, 
will confer a favor by dropping us a card. 
We are glad to rectify mistakes if we 
make them. 



As we go to press, we clip the following 
from the Philadelphia Record : 

"Johnstown, Pa., March 13. — W. Dick 
Shupe, a prominent attorne}^ and a gradu- 
ate of Yale College, died here to-day. 
His death was caused by blood poisoning, 
primarily from a sprain in the knee while 
playing football at Yale six years ago." 



The anniversary of the Kalozetean Lit- 
erary Society will be held on the evening 
of April 6th. Prof. William H. Kindt, 
Principal of the schools of Middletown, 
Pa., will deliver the animal address. 
Special preparations have been made to 



make this anniversary the best in the So, 
ciety's history. From the program, we 
promise a rare treat. 



Philadelphia's aggressive efforts 
giving political education to the mass! 
whereby they may become familiar wit] 
our constitution and organic laws cann 
fail of securing good government. Edu. 
cate the voter, teach him the d uties of the 
citizen, and that to be an American citizen 
means allegiance to the government of th< 
United States, and our people will be gooc 
order-loving and peaceful citizens. 



Mr. Andrew Carnegie's offer to co 
tribute one dollar for every dollar eo: 
tributed otherwise, for the relief of 
poor of Pittsburg, has cost him 
$125,000. A munificence of this kind h 
a great significance, and means more t 
the comfort it brings to the suffering p 
It teaches the brotherhood of the ra 
and that America's wealthy are sym 
thetic and are ever ready to be fai 
almoners whenever occasion demands 



While attending the recent session 
tbe Maryland Conference, we were highl; 
gratified to learn that our church 
Washington, D. C, has had such a suc- 
cessful year. The report showed thai 
there is a membership of one hundred and 
two, and that all assessments were full 
and that there is a flourishing Sunday' 
school of about two hundred. The prop- 
erty has greatly enhanced in value. The 
indebtedness is still about twenty-five 
hundred dollars, which is expected to to 
raised during this year. The church lias 
showed most excellent wisdom in the se- 
lection of the location. The increase 
members was Y50 per centum, whi| 
should be most gratifying to those w' 
contributed. 



Easter, the Christian Passover 
festival of the resurrection of Christ, 
be observed on the 25th Last. The es 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



39 



church had great trouble in fixing a date 
for its observance. Not until Constantine 
had the subject brought before the Coun- 
cil of Nice in 325, was the rule adopted 
which makes Easter to be alwaj-s the first 
Sunday after the full moon which happens 
upon or next after the 21st of March. If 
the full moon happens on a Sunday, Eas- 
ter is the Sundaj^ after. Easter may 
come as early as March 22, or as late as 
April 25. We trust the day will mean 
more than colored eggs or egg picking, 
and will be observed in the light of its 
full significance. 



" An aged man of wealth, and with no 
heir, bound himself to Prof. C. E. Kreibel 
to give a million dollars to a university 
to be founded and conducted in the in- 
terests of the members of } 7 oung people's 
societies. Prof. Kriebel 'has located that 
endowment on North Manchester College, 
Church of the United Brethren in Christ. 
This fund is to be used solely for the 
education of the worthy poor, especially 
ministers and ministers' children. These 
benefits are open to all denominations. 
The help offered is the entire expense of 
the student, board, tuition, and room, 
under some conditions." 

This magnificent donation, from an un- 
known friend, has been bestowed upon a 
most worthy class, one which thoroughly 
appreciates the great advantages it brings. 
It will be a stimulus to the entire educa- 
tional work of our church. May God 
bless the hand which has so liberally 
sown. 



Since our last issue three of our co- 
operating Conferences held their annual 
sessions. 

The Pennsylvania, being first in order, 
was held at Shippensburg, February 21- 
26, in the new United Brethren church 
recently erected under the supervision of 
the Rev. A. 11. Ayres, a former student of 
the College. The educational interests 
were considered by this body on Saturday 
afternoon, and after the reading of an 
excellent report by Rev. B. F. Daugherty 
stirring addresses were delivered by Pres- 



dent Bierman and Revs. M. J. Mumma 
and D. R. Miller. Rev. Dr. Eberly and 
George A. Wolf were elected trustees. 

During the following week the Virginia 
Conference held its sessions at Staunton, 
Va. Here the cause of education re- 
ceived due attention by an able report 
from Rev. J. B. Chamberlin and addresses 
by members of the Conference. Revs. 
J. B. Chamberlin and J. C. S. Myer were 
re-elected trustees. 

On March 8-12 the Maryland Confer- 
ence was in session at Keedysville, Md., 
an old United Brethren town. The Col- 
lege interests were considered by this 
body on Saturda}^ morning, and after the 
reading of an excellent report by Rev. M. 
Stine Bovey, President Bierman, Revs. 
J. W. Kiracofe, S. N. Snell, D. D. Keedy 
and A. M. Evers favored the Conference 
with interesting remarks. Revs. J. E. 
Font and Samuel J. Evers were elected 
trustees. The Conference unanimously 
decided to observe " College Day " on all 
the fields of labor. 

No one at these Conferences took 
greater interest or wielded more influence 
for our College than Bishop Kephart, the 
presiding officer. Having been engaged 
in college w r ork for many years as pro- 
fessor or president, he could speak from 
experience and with authorit} r , and be 
improved every opportunity to impress 
our people with the need of sustaining 
the College. 



Educational theory in this country 
seems to be much in advance of what 
public opinion will allow to be practiced. 
There are many teachers who would like 
to teach boys and girls, instead of simply 
storing their minds temporarily with the 
facts of grammar, arithmetic, geography, 
etc. It is not unusual to hear superin- 
tendents say that their schools are not as 
they would like to have them, but the 
public will not provide for gr-eater effi- 
cienc}\ Educators, therefore, are not only 
concerned with formulating a proper 



40 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



theoiy of education, but they must endea- 
vor to create the conditions that will 
permit the practice which the theory de- 
mands in order to be actualized. How to 
win over public opinion in favor of a 
better school S3^stem is one of the most 
important considerations of the day. 

Excellent school journals and schools 
of pedagogy are rendering valuable ser- 
vice in this important work, but when we 
consider what the colleges are doing to- 
ward it directly we cannot say that it is 
very much. It would be interesting to 
know how many college faculties ever 
discuss this subject. We cannot conclude 
that this question has been carefulty con- 
sidered when we find that few college 
courses, at? least in Pennsylvania, include 
instruction in education as an art or 
science. 

Just as we have little interest in that 
which we know little or nothing about, 
so we must expect the leaders of public 
opinion to be indifferent toward a better 
school s}-stem until the} r are properly 
informed in education. What better ser- 
vice could the colleges render than to 
send out their thousands each year to 
take their places as leaders thoroughly 
interested and informed concerning the 
needs in education. The Ohio University 
Bulletin has the following editorial on 
this subject : 

" No one familiar with college students 
will assert that they determine what sub- 
jects they will elect, so far as they have 
the privilege of election, by means of any 
well-defined educational principles. They 
know nothing about educational prin- 
ciples. Their most definite notion of 
education often is that it is something 
that will help them to get on in the world. 
Of education as consisting in the har- 
monious development of all the powers of 
the mind and of the man, of the fitness of 
the various studies they pursue to occa- 
sion this development, of the value of a 
good liberal education as the foundation 
for the best professional education, of all 
these things the average college student 
has very confused ideas. The result is 
that he either studies the subjects that do 



not particularly attract him in a half, 
hearted, perfunctory wa}% or leaves col. 
lege when his course is half-finished to 
prepare for his profession. We hold to 
the theory that a student is a human 
being ; that being a human being, the way 
to get the most intelligent work out o| 
him is to appeal to his intelligence ; that 
to induce him to prosecute his studies in 
an intelligent way, to choose his lines oh 
work under the guidance of their educa- 
tional value rather than that of untrained 
caprice, to see the relation between liberal 
and professional education in its true] 
light, it is important, indeed essential, 
to make the study of education a part ofj 
his required work. 

That the study of education would be 
of great benefit to the parent is too nearly! 
self-evident to admit of much discussion. 
It is fast becoming an axiom among edu- 
cators that the teacher requires profes-l 
sional training as much as the doctorj 
that to say that the doctor requires pro-; 
fessional training and deny it of the! 
teacher is to put the body above the mind.' 
But is not the parent a teacher? Is hey] 
not the only teacher of the child pre- 
cisel}' in that period of his life when his 
brain is most plastic and the impressions 
upon it are most lasting ? 

" It has been said again and again that 
we spend more money for education and 
have poorer schools than any other nation 
in the civilized world. What is the! 
reason for it ? A part of the reason cer-j 
tainly is found in the fact that the publi<j 
does ^not know what a good school is. 
Public opinion, in the matter of education! 
as in all other matters, follows its leaders;) 
and the leaders of public opinion, the] 
lawyers and doctors, the professional 
men generall} r , are almost as ignorant asl 
to what constitutes a good school system; 
as the rank and file. The result is that 
really good work in a superintendent, so 
far from increasing Ins prospects of pro-; 
motion, often injures them. And of the; 
best superintendents it can be truthfully 
said that they do not give the public they 
serve the best systems of education that 
their professional knowledge and zeal 
make possible, but the best that public 
opinion permits. How to educate public 
opinion, how to make it realize that the 
superintendent of the schools of a city 
exercises a greater influence over the rjfl 
ing generation than any other man in it t 
how to make it understand that his duties 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



41 



require an amount of natural ability and 
a decree of general and specific training 
of a very high order, is a question second 
in importance to none before the educators 
of this country to-da}-. This University 
contends that it is a step in the right 
direction at least to get hold of those who 
*are to be leaders of public opinion in a 
few years. Win over the leaders of pub- 
lic opinion and the whole position is 
won." 



Personals and Locals. 

On Wednesday evening the 7th inst. a 
large audience greeted " Judge " William 
B. Green, the wonderful reciter and stoiy 
teller of Brooklyn, N. Y. The entertain- 
ment was first-class, and enjoyed by all 
present. Those who stayed away missed 
a rare treat. Among his best recitations 
were Riley's "Knee Deep in June;" Rus- 
sell's "Whoa, Nebuchadnezzar;" "The 
Deestrict School," and " Whittier's "Bar- 
bara Fritchie," which was followed by 
rounds of applause. This was the last en- 
tertainment of the course, and the lecture 
committee wishes to thank our patrons 
from Lebanon, Annville and vicinity for 
their liberal support. 

Mr. Ralph Cromleighof Duncannon, Pa., 
spent Tuesda} 1 -, 6th inst., with friends at 
the College. 

A number of the Y. M. C. A. members 
are wearing new gold buttons, the emblem 
of the organization. 

A large and appreciative audience 
greeted the New York Ideal Concert Com- 
pany in the College Chapel, February 22d. 
It was one of the best concerts ever given 
m our Chapel. All were specialists and re- 
ceived repeated encores. Miss Mecklern, 
as a solo saxophonist, deserves special 
mention. 

With the return of mild weather, base- 
ball has been revived. The club has been 
reorganized with W. H. Kreider, '94, as 
manager, and H. E. Runkle, '98, as cap- 
tain. Steps are being taken to put the 
elub on a good financial condition and to 
secure new suits. 

President Bierman and Prof. McPer- 
m ad attended the recent session of the 
Pennsylvania Conference at Shippens- 
m%, Pa. 

At the unanimous petition of the stu- 
nts the suspension of the regular duties 
°* the College was extended to Friday, 
th e 23d ult. 



Mr. H. Bender, of New York cit} r , 
visited Mr. Huber, '94, February 12th. 

Miss Ella Penn3 r packer, '94, spent Feb- 
ruary 25th at her home in Mountville, Pa. 

Miss Sleichter spent the 25th with her 
parents at Scotland, Pa. 

Geo. Kindt, '94, spent the 25th ult. 
visiting friends in Reading, Pa. 

Messrs. Huber, '94, and Runkle, '98, 
visited G. K. Hartman, '94, at Shiremans- 
town, during our holidays. 

Our pastor, Rev. Spa} r d, has been ap- 
pointed to York, 1st church, at the recent 
session of Pennsylvania Conference. At 
this writing he has not accepted. What 
he will do has not been made public. 

Miss Albertson spent Sunday, February 
12th, at her home, Atlantic City, N. J. 

Miss Carrie Klinedinst, of York, Pa., 
spent February 10th at home. 

S. E. Albert, '97, visited his parents at 
East Hanover, February 10th. 

Wm. Beattie, '98, spent February 10th 
at his home in York, Pa. 

W. H. Kreider, '94, was in Harrisburg 
February 24th for reference in the State 
Library. 

The Junior Class have had their sta- 
tionery printed in brown ink ; brown and 
white are their class colors. 

J. M. Smeltzer, '97, of Myerstown, Pa., 
had a severe attack of la grippe for a 
week, but has sufficiently recovered to re- 
sume his duties. 

The class in qualitative analysis have 
begun the work and will continue through- 
out the spring term. 

A Choral Union has been organized 
from the different choirs and other musi- 
cal talent in town, under the directorship 
of Prof. Lehman. They meet weekly and 
expect to render a cantata during the 
early spring. 

Andrew Garber visited his parents at 
Salunga, Pa., from February 16th to 26th. 

The faculty and a large number of stu- 
dents attended Dr. Valentine's special 
sermon on education, at the Lutheran 
church in Annville, the 12th ult. Dr. 
Valentine represented the Seminary at 
Gettysburg, Pa. 

We are glad to note the increased at- 
tendance at the musical recitals. The pro- 
grammes are very well rendered. 

The melodious (?) song of the black- 
bird is again heard in the campus. 

Miss Bertha Mumma, of Hummelstown, 
Pa., visited friends at the College on the 
22d ult. 



42 THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



The students enjoyed numerous sleigh- 
ing parties during the past month. 

The Sophomores contemplate getting 
class stationery in the near futm*e. 

D. S. Eshleman filled the pulpit of Rev. 
Harry Miller, of Palmyra, Pa., Feb. 25th. 

Mrs. Alb.ertson, of Atlantic City, N. J., 
is paying a visit to her daughter, Miss 
Gertrude, our esteemed art teacher. 

One of the class in quantitative analysis 
has computed the length of his hair re- 
quired to weigh an ounce, and found it to 
be 48,050 feet. 

A sleighing party of students from 
Myerstown called at the College the night 
of Februaiy 16th, but most of the boys 
were at the joint session of the P. L. S. 
and C. L. S. 

The College Forum was represented at 
the Pennsylvania Conference by S. F. 
Huber, '94f 

Messrs. Runkle, '98, Yoe, '98, and 
Peters, spent Washington's birthday at 
their homes. 

February 18th the pulpit of Rev. J. G. 
Herold, of Ephrata, Pa., was filled by I 
E. Albert, '9t, and on the 25th by Sheri 
den Garman, '96. 

Who posted the Anti-Prohibition Club- 
programme on the bulletin board. Presi- 
dent takes pride in showing it to all visi- 
tors calling at his office. 

Geo. L. Kindt, '94, has presented the 
labratory a set of reagent bottles, which 
greatly improve the appearance of the 
table. 

" There is a marked difference between 
our books," said the professor, as he 
noticed the pencil marks between the 
lines of a certain Virgil. 

We are agreeably surprised to find that 
our Prohibition Club is still alive ; this 
fact was demonstrated on Mondajr even- 
ing, March 5th, by a very enthusiastic 
meeting. An excellent programme was 
rendered. 

" Stamps, stamps," cried the collectors. 
We are going to make our fortunes. 
Some students have the stamp mania, as 
they have them by the cigarbox full. 1 

We would like to know who wanted a 
real rainbow to experiment with in phy- 
sics, and who had found a solid cavity, 
and who saw a " philo" badge belonging 
to a member of '94, and worn by a young 
lady in Maryland, and 

Messrs. 6. E. Good, '94, and I. G. 
Hoerner, '96, spent the 22d and 23d ult.,at 
their home in Progress, Pa. 



Which one of the ladies received a nia 
valentine in the shape of four live mice 
Valentines are not usually put in boxes. 

Interesting news : the singing of a quad 
ratio and the reading of a chapter o 
Hezekiah. Scott wrote two volume 
daily. 

President Bierman and Prof Deaner at 
tended the Maryland Conference, held a 
Keedysville, Md., the 8th inst. 

Messrs. Young and Trout, in companj 
with Rev. Enck, of Manheim, Pa., visitei 
the College on the 23d ult. to make ar 
rangements to enter the College during 
the spring term. 

Lost, strayed or stolen — a member o 
the Senior Class. 

Messrs. Hoerner and Boyer have re 
cently suffered from an attack of I 
grippe. 

The entertainment by the musical de 
partment of the College, Friday evening 
the 16th inst., was a perfect success. The 
program was of high order and rendered 
with skill. 

On the 9th inst. Chas. B. Wingerd, '91, 
attended a party in Lebanon and report! 
a most enjoyable time. 

The recent fine weather has called forth 
special efforts in all kinds of sports. 

The second division of Prof. Dcaner's 
rhetorical class gave one of the best en 
tertainments of the year on February 11 
The class, as a whole, did most excellently. 
The secret of the whole matter lies in the 
fact that all were well prepared. The 
professor has won a reputation for god 
publics, which fact accounts for the very 
large audience which greeted the class on 
this occasion. 

At the open meeting of the G. A. R. of 
Annville, held Saturday evening, the 3d 
inst., Prof. Deaner spoke, giving reminis- 
cences of the battle of Antietam. 

How chagrined the young man fell 
who thought he was sending a valentine 
to his best girl, when he found out that 
his chum had misplaced the valentine by 
a Sunday-school book. (The valentine 
was afterwards presented to her at the 
joint literary meeting.) 

Mr. William Kieffer, of Harfisburgi 
Pa., spent the 11th inst. with S. F. Huber, 
'94. 



God be thanked for books ! They are 
the voices of the distant and the dea<| 
and make us heirs of the spiritual life o' 
past ages. — William E. Channing. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



43 



mice 
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College Directory. 
Faeulty. 

E. BENJ. BIERMAN, A. M., Ph. D., 

PRESIDENT, 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 
H. CLAY DEANER, A. M., 
Professor of the Latin Language. 

JOHN E. LEHMAN, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 
Rev. JNO. A. McDERMAD, A. M., 
Professor of the Greek Language. 
JOHN A. SHOTT, Ph. B., 
Professor of Natural Science. 
MARY E. SLEICHTER, A. B., 
Professor of English Literature. 

CARRIE M. FLINT, 
Professor of Instrumental Music. 
GERTRUDE ALBERTSON, 
Professor of Harmony and Fine Art. 
HARVEY D. MILLER, B. S., 
Teacher of the Violin. 

Literary Societies. 

CLIONIAN. 
Miss MABEL SAYLOR, President. 
Miss ESTELLA STEHMAN, Secretary. 

KALOZETEAN. 
JAMES F. ZUG, President. 
SHERIDAN GARMAN, Secretary. 
PHIL OKOSMIAN. 
JNO. R. "WALLACE, President. 
W. E. HEILMAN, Secretary. 

T. M. G. A. 
GEO. K. HARTMAN, President. 
HARRY W. MAYER, Secretary. 

T. W. 0. A. 
Miss MAGGIE STRICKLER, President. 
Miss ESTELLA STEHMAN, Secretary. 



Philokosmian Literary Society. 

Esse Quam Videri. 

It is a recognized fact that poorly pre- 
pared lessons usually follow a holiday. 
Doubtless for this reason the Faculty 
granted the petition of the students re- 
questing the Friday following Washing- 
ton's Birthday as a holiday. A number 
of our members, taking advantage of this 
" ri ^f vacation, made short visits, some to 
their homes ; others called upon friends, 
&nd still others were looking after business 
interests. Consequently, we had no ses- 
sion of our Society on the evening of the 
«»a ult. 



We have recently introduced into our 
Society work a new feature which, we 
believe, gives promise of beneficial results. 
Discussions are now decided by a judge, 
who publicly reviews the arguments pre- 
sented by both sides, then gives his deci- 
sion with his reasons for it. Many 
advantages from a literary standpoint 
must arise from this method. It has a 
tendency to bring about closer attention 
on the part of the judge. Furthermore, 
the public review of arguments tends to 
remove entirely any possible prejudices 
that may exist in the mind of the judge, 
thus producing a decision more likely to 
be satisfactory to both parties interested 
in the discussion. It is also beneficial to 
the less experienced members, who by 
this means are given an opportunity to 
notice more intelligently which arguments 
have a direct bearing upon the ques- 
tion at issue and which have not, and 
are thus led to closer habits of thought* 
Its disciplinary value to the person acting 
as judge is also an important considera- 
tion. 

The conjoint session of Clios and Philos 
on the 16th ult. was interesting in the ex- 
treme, as all such sessions are, and was 
highly enjoyed by all present. 

One of the novel features of the occa- 
sion was the matching of two ladies 
against two gentlemen in debate. The 
question, "Besolved, That the mental 
capacit} r of woman is greater than that of 
man," was thoroughly ventilated, the 
ladies contending for the superiority of 
woman, the gentlemen for that of man. 

The following is a brief synopsis of the 
more weighty arguments presented : 

The affirmative maintained that nuvn's 
yielding to woman in the Garden of Eden, 
while woman yielded only to Satan him- 
self, indicated feminine superiority. 

That woman had not been given equal 
chance with man. 

That the gradual ascendency in the or- 
der of creation, woman being the last, 
was also an evidence that she was the 
highest creation. 

That woman's intuitive powers were 
superior to man's and that consequently 
she was higher as a moral being. 

The negative contended that woman 
was originally created a helpmeet and 
that superior ability did not usually act 
in the capacity of assistant. 

That Adam yielded to the combined in- 
fluence of Satan and of Eve, and that 



44 



THE COLLEGE FOB UAL 



Satan recognized her as the weaker in ap- 
proaching her first. 

That man and woman started on the 
same level in the beginning and conse- 
quently man's present superiority is an 
evidence of higher capacity. 

That the ascending order of created 
life was true of creations of different geo- 
logic ages, but not necessarily true of the 
creations of the same age. 

Not every son surpasses his father. 

That intuitive power partakes of the 
nature of instinct and is a lower order of 
intelligence than reason developed most 
highl}- in man. 

That the brain of man, making full al- 
lowance for difference of size, is one ounce 
heavier than that of woman, giving him 
the greater mental power. 

Any one who is in doubt as to whether 
man or woman is the superior mentally, 
may be helped to a conclusion by these 
few suggestions. 

Equality, however, seems to be the more 
reasonable view. Each possesses points 
of superiority over the other, which, if 
carefully weighed, will most probably pro- 
duce a balance. 

Each has been endowed by the Almighty 
with peculiar qualities, intended to supply 
the deficiency in the other. 

We are glad to be able to state that 
three accessions have recently been added 
to our list of members. They are Messrs. 
Zerbe, Henry and Sleichter. We hope that 
they will find associations with us pleas- 
ant, and their work agreeable as well as 
profitable. 

On the evening of March 30th we are 
expecting the Annville Post, G. A,. R., to 
be with us. An interesting program, as 
we believe, has been prepared, and we an- 
ticipate spending a pleasant evening. We 
would be glad to see as many of our friends 
on that occasion as can conveniently 
attend. The following is the program : 

Patriotic Chorus By the Society. 

Recitation— Selected, N. C. Schlichter. 

Address— The American Flag J. H. Maysilles. 

Oration— The Defenders of Our Nation, 

J. R. Wallace. 

Trio Messrs. Maysilles, Kreider and Stein. 

Address— Influence of the O. A. R., S. F. Huber. 

Recitation— Sheridan's Ride, ...Warren Henry. 

Quartette, 

Messrs, Good, Huber, Beattie and Eshleman. 

Discussion— Was McClellan as Great a General as 
Grant? Affirmative, D. S. Eshleman; Nega- 
tive, O. E. Good. 

Original Story, W. E. Heilman. 

Instrumental Solo, H. G. Henry. 

Debate— Resolved, That the Civil War did more for 
the Cause of Liberty than the Revolutionary 
War. Affirmative, G. H. Stein, W. H. Kreider; 
Negative, I. G. Hoerner, I. E. Albert. 



Among our visitors during the past 
month were Messrs. Hershey, Staufier, 
Seabold, Smith and Hartz. 



Kalozetean Literary Society. 



Palma non sine pulvere. 



Enthusiasm in Society work has not 
not retrograded. Members all take active 
part in the programme, and especially do 
they exhibit more interest in matters not 
found in the literal work. We have 
reached the point where all are workers, 
not drones. 

March 2d we held a co-joint session 
with our sister society — Clionian. The 
programme was rendered entertainingly. 
Every speaker performed his duty accu- 
rately, and to say that the bo3 r s had a 
pleasant time is putting it mild. No 
doubt the boys will be thankful and the 
girls pleased if the prophecies predicted 
in the Budget will never be fulfilled. 

The only regret that we have is that 
these sessions are not more frequent ; they 
are both entertaining and instructive. 

Februaiy 24th Mr. Geo. Kindt paid 
Reading a flying visit to look after some 
personal private interests pertaining toi 
the heart. 

Mr. Harry Mayer viewed Harrisburg 
on the 22d. 

Mr. Sheridan Garman very faithfully 
filled the pulpit presided over by Rev ] 
Herold at Ephrata. A full description of 
his success as a minister was given in the 
Budget at the co-joint session. His fame 
in that field of labor will be enviable i 
the future. 

Prof. W. H. Kindt, Principal of Mid- 
dletown High Schools, paid us a visit o~ 
the 2d. His talk did the Kalo. boy" 
good. We are glad to welcome our ex- 
members when they honor us with their 
presence. Their words alwa}^ give u$ 
encouragement to be faithful in our wol 
and to remember our motto. 



Clioniaii Literary Society. 



Virtute et Fide. 



Society work has been somewhat varied 
during the past term by the two joint ses* 
sions, one with the P. L. S., February 16. 
The other with the K. L. S., March 2. 
Both sessions were unusually interesting 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



45 



an d heartily enjoyed by all who were so 
fortunate as to be present. 

The meeting with the P. L. S. was or- 
ganized with Miss Albertson as President; 
Miss Strickler, Secretary; Mr. Hoerner, 
Critic; Mr. Yoe, Chaplin; Miss Forten- 
baugh, Pianist; Mr. Huber, Janitor. The 
following program was then rendered : 
Quartette - Messrs. Beattie, Eshleman, Good and 

^ Huber. „ _ m , 

russertation w - H - Kreider 

ploltatlon Miss Bowman 

iMtrumenl'al Solo, Miss Fortenbaugh 

Essay- All is Not Gold tbat Glitters,. . Miss Richard 

Adores" J . R. Wallace 

Instrumental Chorus Members of P. L. S. 

Original Story, •• .........1UM Black 

Address— My Favorite Author and his Works, 

Vocal Solo Miss Wilson 

Debate— Resolved, "That Woman's Mental Capa- 
city is Greater than Man's." 
Affirmative— Miss Wilson. Miss Sleichter. 
Negative— Mr. Maysilles, Mr. Good. 

Swing Branch, Mr. Eshleman 

Clio and Philo Songs. 

The meeting with the K. L. S. was or- 
ganized with Mr. Garman, President; Mr. 
Mayor, Secretary; Miss Wilson, Critic; 
Mr. Buddinger, Chaplin; Miss Stehman, 
Pianist; Mr. Kindt, Janitor. The follow- 
ing program was then rendered : 

Instrumental Duet, , 

Misses Bowman and Fortenbaugh 

Essay-Intellectual Culture, Miss Black 

Vocal Solo Miss Wilson 

Address— College Athletics, H. W. Mayor 

Recitation, Miss Albertson 

Violin Solo, Mr. Garman 

Address— Dangers of American Liberty, 

Mr. Buddinger 

Vocal Duet—" The Carnival of Venice, Bordise 

Misses Pennypacker and Gingrich. 

Debate— Resolved, "That Education has more ef- 
fect on man's character than Hereditary influence." 

Affirmative— Miss Stehman, Mr. Kindt. 

Negative— Miss Sleichter, Mr. Zug. 

Among the visitors who were present 
on these occasions were Prof. Lehman and 
wife, Prof. Shott, and W. H. Kindt, '90. 

Misses Sleichter and Pennypacker, '94, 
spent Sunday, February 25th, at their re- 
spective homes in Scotland and Mount- 
ville. 

Miss Black spent Thursday, February 
22d, at Palmyra, attending the S. S. Con- 
vention. 



Our Alumni. 

'90, W. R. Keller, teacher of the Johns- 
town Grammar School, recently received 
a College State certificate. These certifi- 
cates are awarded to graduates of colleges 
of recognized standing who have taught 
three years successfully. Mr. Keller's 
certificate is numbered nineteen. 

'fO, Mrs. Mary A. Weiss Reitzel paid 
her Alma Mater a visit on the 3d inst. 
She expressed great gratification at the 
improved condition of the buildings, etc. 



Mr. Reitzel left for a trip to the Holy 
Land. 

'78, Rev. C. A. Burtner, Ph. D., who 
has been a faithful itinerant in Pennsyl- 
vania Conference, was elected Presiding 
Elder at the recent session of Conference. 

'81, Mr. Geo. A. Wolf was elected a 
trustee at the last session of Pennsylvania 
Conference. Mr. Wolf has been successful 
in business and will know how to care for 
the interests of his Alma Mater. 

'85, M. M. Burtner was granted a year's 
location, at his own request, and will move 
to Altenwald, Pa. 

'81, Dr. G. R. Shenk, whom we reported 
as critically ill in our last, is improving, 
we are glad to report. 

"13, Miss Sarah Burns is resting at 
Pekin, 111. She was awarded several 
prizes at the World's Fair for artistic dis- 
play of agricultural products. 

'78, Rev. H. B. Dohner has gone to the 
Holy Land on a short trip. 

'89, Rev. B. F. Daugherty was appointed 
to the Otterbein TJ. B. Church at Harris- 
burg. 

'90, E. B. Bowman goes to Mechanics- 
burg to take charge of the XL B. Church 
there. 

'91, W. H. Washinger succeeds Dr. C. 
T. Stearn in the pastorate of the TJ. B. 
Church at Chambersburg, Pa. 

'91, S. C. Enck was a visitor to his 
Alma Mater recently. He brought two 
voung men who purpose entering school. 

'92, Miss Kate P. Mumma visited friends 
at Annville on the 18th ult. 

'90, Rev. J. T. Spangler, who will com- 
plete his Seminary course in May, has 
been appointed to the pastorate of the U. 
B. Church, Hagerstown, Md. 



Only the Stars and Stripes. 

In New York, on St. Patrick's Day, the 
green fiag with the golden harp floated 
from the City Hall. In Brooklyn the 
movement to fly it was vetoed. In Phila- 
delphia there was neither the unfurling 
nor the movement. 

Our way is the better. We have loyal 
and devoted sons of Saint Patrick and 
Saint George and Saint Andrew. We 
have ardent Frenchmen who, but a few 
months ago, proudly celebrated the hun- 
dredth anniversary of their Society of 
Benevolence. We have zealous and true 
hearted Germans who cherish the grateful 
memories of their beloved Fatherland. 



46 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



We have representatives of other nation- 
alities who in their allegiance to our flag 
do not lose the pride or the impulse of 
their nativit} r . 

But while they have their national days 
and preserve on appropriate occasion their 
national observance, they wisely propose 
nothing which is inconsistent with their 
lo} T al and true American citizenship. 
They may put out their national flags in 
their own way — to that there can be no 
objection. American citizens of Revolu- 
tionary stock may join them in honoring 
the elements which contribute to our 
common nationality — this is entirely fit 
and unexceptionable. But they have re- 
cognized the broad distinction between 
what belongs to private individuals and 
what belongs to public representation. 
They have seen that while the green flag 
or the cross of St. George or the tri-color 
ma}- float without objection from a thou- 
sand windows, there is but one flag that 
can properly float from the City Hall, and 
that is the flag which symbolizes our own 
national sovereignty. Philadelphia em- 
braces various nationalities, but more 
than any other city it gives them the 
American mould. The}" rightly cherish 
the memories of the land of their birth or 
ancestry, but they do not forget that 
above all the} r are Americans. 

This spirit, which is the masterful and 
dominant impulse of Philadelphia, re- 
lieves us from the embarrassments and 
difficulties which sometimes present them- 
selves at other points. There ought to 
be no such question as was offered in 
New York and Brooklyn. It is plain that 
the public building, which is the embodi- 
ment of public authority, should know 
only one flag. We can share the obser- 
vances with which our fellow citizens of 
any nationality remember a national day 
or a patron saint, but we must do it in 
our own appropriate and dignified way. 
When London celebrates the Queen's 
birthday with a pageantry, of flags every- 
where, the American Legation joins in 
the tribute. But it does not fly the 



Rensselaer 



^Polytechn ic'4\ 
Institute, 

Troy, N.Y. 

Lccal examinut ions provided for. Send for a Catalogue. 



British flag. In honoring the British 
Queen it still floats the Stars and Stripes, 
And that starry banner is the only 
standard that should float from our public 
buildings. — Philadelphia Press. 



Exchanges. 

All exchanges receiving a copy of The 
College Forum are requested to exchange, 

The " Hard Times " number of the 
Mirror is quite a novel arrangement. 

Chicago University conferred its first 
degree of Ph. D. upon a Japanese. — Ex- 
change. 

It is said that Governor Pattison will 
probably succeed to the Presidenc}- of 
Lehigh University. — Exchange. 

Our new exchanges this month are the 
following : English High School Record 
The Academy, Mephistophelean, High 
School Life, Record, The Midland 
Oracle, of Bellows Falls, Vt., High School 
Idea, The Recorder, Pioneer, High School 
Item, High School Opinion, Review, 
Drury Howler, Princeville Academy Sol, 
Englewood High School Journal, High 
School Notes and The Crescent. 



<£ C $10 and $20, Genuine Confederate Bills 
J only five cents each ; $50 and $100 bills 
10 cents each ; 25c and 50c shinplasters 10 
cents each ; $1 and $2 bills 25 cents each. Sent 
securely sealed on receipt of price. Address, 
Chas. D. Barker, 90 S. Forsyth St., Afei 
lanta, Ga. 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SUSGE0NS. 

OPPO. COOK COUNTY HOSPITAL, CHICAGO, ILL. 

The Winter Term begins September. 1894, and ends April, 
1895. Total fees §105 each Winter Term, and a laboratory 
deposit which is returnable. Four annual graded courses, 
with advanced standing for graduates in Pharmacy and Uni- 
versity preparatory courses prior to the study of Medicine. 
Clinical and laboratory facilities unsurpassed. 
For annual circular of information, apply to 

W. E. yUINE, M D., 

Pres. of the Faculty, 
813 WEST HARRISON ST 



HUSTON, ASHMEAD, 
& CO., Ltd. 




Engravers stationers, 

1022 WALNUT STREET, 

Philadelphia 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



pUMBERLAND VALLE V RAILROAD. 
TIMETABLE— Oct. 1, 1893. 



TIMET 

Down Trains. 



Lv. Winchester 

" Martinsburg . ... 

1 Hagerstown 

Greencastle 

" Chainbersburg .. 

" SMppensburg 

" 3?ewville 

" Carlisle 

" Mechanicsburg.. 
Ar. Dillsbnrg 

" Harrisburg 



C'bg I Ky'e 
Acc. 1 Exp 



No.12 No. 2 



A. M. 

6 15 

7 00 

7 40 

8 09 
8 30 

8 55 

9 15 
9 40 

10 04 



Philadelphia. 

New York 

Baltimore 



No. 4 N _ G No. 8 No. 10 



A. M. p. M. 



6 10 
6 32 

6 53 

7 18 
7 42 



10 2--, 



11 25 1 25 
2 03 4 03 
11 15 | 3 10 

A. M. P. M. 



8 30 
'905 



1 25 
4 03 
3 10 



11 25 

11 48 

12 08 
12 30 
12 50 

1 15 
1 40 



200 

6 50 
938 
6 45 

P. M. 




1115 
3 50 
10 40 
P. M. 



Additional trains will leave Carlisle daily except Sunday at 
5-55 a. m., 7:68 a. m., 3:40 p. m., stopping at all intermediate 
stations, arriving at Harrisburg at 6:40 a. m., 8:03 a. m., 4:30 
p. m. 

Evening Mail runs daily between Harrisburg and Cham 
bersburg. 



W. F. BKCKEB. 



J. P. BBUGGEB. 



Up Trains. 


Win 
Acc. 

No. 1 


Me's 
Exp 

No. 3 


Hag 
Acc. 

No. 5 


Ev'g 
Mail 

No. 7 


C'bg 
Acc. 

No. 17 


N. O. 
Exp- 

No. 9 




P. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. 


M. 


P. M. 


p. 


M. 




11 40 


4 45 


8 53 


1! 




2 15 


4 


23 




8 00 


12 15 




9 


00 


200 


2 


06 


" Philadelphia 


11 20 


4 30 


8 50 


11 


so 


220 


4 


30 




A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


p. 


M. 


P. M. 


p. 


M. 




4 40 


7 53 


12 40 


3 


40 


5 20 


8 


Oil 




















" Mechanicsburg 


5 03 


8 13 


103 


A 


01 


5 41 


8 


20 


" Carlisle 


5 30 


8 36 


1 29 


4 


25 


6 05 


8 


44 


" Newville 


5 55 


9 00 


1 52 


4 


55 


6 36 


9 


08 


" SMppensburg 


6 15 


9 21 


213 


S 


in 


6 57 


9 


29 


" Cbambersburg 


6 40 


9 43 


2 35 


5 


35 


720 


9 


50 


" Greencastle 


7 02 


10 04 


3 01 


5 


50 




10 


1" 


" Hagerstown 


7 25 
9 30 
1100 


10 27 

11 VI 

12 00 
A. M. 


3 25 


6 18 

7 02 
7 50 

P. M. 




10 35 
A. M. 


" Martinsburg 


P. M. 


Ar. Winchester 






A. M. 


P. M. 



Additional trains wili leave Harrisburg daily except Sunday 
at 10:35 a. m.. )0:45 p. m., arriving at Carlisle at 11:20 a. m., 
11:30 p. m., stopping at all intermediate stations ; additional 
train will leave Hagerstown at 8:00 a. m., arriving at 11:00 
a. ro., stopping at all i termediate stations. 

Pullman PalaceSleepingCars between Hagerstown and New 
York on Keystone Express and Night Express east, and on 
Memphis Express and New Orleans Express wi St. 

Pullman Sleeping Cars on Night Express and New Orleans 
Express between Philadelphia and Nrw Orleans. 

TF you wish to advertise anything anywhere at any time, 
4 write to GEO. P. ROW EL, L & Co., No. 10 Spruce Street, 
New York. 

EVERY one in need if information on the subject of ad- 
^ vertisiug will do well to obtain a copy of "Book for 
*»J erasers," 368 pages, price one dollar. Mailed, postage 
th \ 011 rece 'Pt of price. ( 'on tains acareful compilation from 
smV i ericau Newspaper Directory of all the best papers 
anli e i 0, » - >w1s; gives the circulation rating of every one, 
ii;' a .S9<>d deal of Information about rates and other matters 
pertaining to the business of advertising. Address KOW- 
^ ADVERTISING BUREAU, 10 Spruce Street, New 



Eastern Book Store, 

315 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
BOOKS AM) STAT ION EllY. 

Special Kates, to Students. 

IW Second-Hand School Books a Specialty. 

WRITE FOR PRICES. 



J 



L. SAYLOR'S SONS, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

CARRIAGES, 

LIGHT BUGGIES, PONY PHAETONS, ETC. 
STRICTLY FIRST CLASS. 

Shops Opposite Eagle Hotel, ANNVILLE, PA. 

7 B. MARSHALL, M. D., 



No. 34- East Main Street, 

ANNVILLE, PA 

ISAACMANN & SON, 

LARGEST CLOTHIERS, 

834 Cumberland Street, 

LEBANON, I* Am 

THE BEST GOODS EO.K THE LEAST MONEY. 

J 



R. McCAULY, 



DAILY MEAT MARKET. 

GOOD MEAT. LOW PRICES. ANNVILLE. FA. 

JOHN TRUMP, 

J BOOT AND SHOE MAKER, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



S. SEABOLD, 

DEALER IN 



w. 

Drop, Medicines, Perfumery and Toilet Articles, 

No. 3 East Slain St., Annville, Pa. 




CAN I OBTAIN A PATENT? For a 

Srompt answer and an honest opinion, write to 
11JNN «fc CO., who have had nearly fifty years' 
experience in the patent business. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. A Handbook of In- 
formation concerning Patents and how to ob- 
tain them sent free. Also a catalogue Of mechan- 
ical and scientific books sent free. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice in the Scientific American, and 
thus are brought widely before the public with- 
out cost to the inventor. This splendid paper, 
issued weekly, elegantly illustrated, has by far the 
largest circulation of any scientific work in the 
world. S3 a year. Sample copies sent free. 

Building Edition, monthly, $2.50 a year. Single 
copies, *.£;> cents. Every number contains beau- 
tiful plates, in colors, and photographs of new 
houses, with plans, enabling builders t o show the 
latest designs and secure contracts. Address 
MUNN & CO., New Yohk. 361 Broadway. 



48 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



^yyiLLIAM KIEBLER, 
SHAVING AND HAIR DRESSING, 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop, Annville, Pa. 



ADAM B. HESS, 
OFFICE AT THE HOTE L EAGLE 
OMNIBUS TO ALL TRAINS. 

ANNVILLE. PA. 



J 



ACOB SARGENT, 
FASHIONABLE TAILOR, 

18 and 20 Main St., Annville, Pa. 



DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, GRO- 
CERIES, BOOTS and SHOES, 

— AND — 

GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS. 

J". S- SHORES, 

ANNVILLE, PA 

SNOW FLAKE PRINTING HOUSE, 
A. C. M. HEISTER, Prop., 
FINE JOB PRINTING, 

35 S. White Oak Street - - Annville, Pa. 

WILLIAM WALTZ, 
FASHIONABLE 

HAIR CUTTING AND SHAVING SALOON, 

West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
H. H. KREIDEB. JSO. E. HERB. 

KREIDER & CO., 
DEALERS IN" ALL KINDS OF 

Hard & Soft Coal, Grain, Seeds Salt & Feed. 

Office : Railroad Street, near Depot, 
Telephono Connection. ANNVILLE, PA. 



HE BEST 



T 

FURNITURE, 



STOCK, THE 

PRICES IN 



LOWEST 



-AT- 



JOSEPH MILLER'S. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



DEALER IN 

Gold Watches and Jewelry, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYS 
TKRS AND CREAM. AICM VILLE, PA. 

S. M. SKENE'S BAKERY, 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

FRESH BREAD, CAKES AND BOLLS, 

One Door West Penn'a House, Annville. 

— ,->>•. Headquarters i or — 

GROCERIES, CONFECTIONERIES 

OYSTERS, FRUITS AND NUTS. 
Restaurant Attached. Meals at All Hoars. 

12 West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



If yon want to Buy a Hat right, and a rtgnt Hat, or anything 
Men's Furnishings, 

GO TO 

Successors to RAITT & CO., 
Eighth and Cumber/and Sts., Lebanon, Pa, 



Kinpor ts & She nk 

ANNVILLE, PA., 

Dealers in Dry Goods, Notions 

and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home-made] 
Ingrain and Brussels Carpets. You buy Cheapen 
from us than away from home, and have a large: 
stock to select from. 



U. B. MUTUAL AID S0CIET1 

OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

HOME OFFICE, LEBANON, PENNA. 

Chartered by the State Legislature, March 11, 1869] 
Positive amounts guaranteed and claims paid in 
full. 

Benefits of $1000 insurance secured for $8.' 0. 
Reciprocal Circle Insurance,new and very populafJ 

Invested Assets $14(3,809.91 

Contingent Assets ih;.970.00 

Assessment Basis 5,295,000.01 

Death Losses Paid 6,774.1-3.01 

THE PURIST. 
The payment of EIGHT DOLLARS on application! 
FIVE DOLLARS annually for lour years, and there; 
after TWO DOLLARS annually during life, wit! 
pro rata mortality assessments for each death of u 
member insured for $1000, is as follows: 



Age. 


Ass't 


1 Age. 


Ass'mt 


Age. 


Ass'mt 


Age. 


Assart; 


20 


65 


30 


75 


40 


90 


50 


1 30 


21 


66 


31 


77 


41 


9-J 


51 


1 40 ; 


22 


67 


32 


79 


42 


94 


52 


1 5» 


23 


68 


33 


81 


43 


96 


53 


1 60 


24 


69 


34 


83 


44 


98 


54 


1 70 a 


25 


70 


35 


85 


45 


1 01) 


55 


1 80 . 


26 


71 


36 


86 


46 


1 06 


50 


1 92 j 


27 


' 72 


37 


87 


47 


1 12 






28 
29 


73 
74 


38 
39 


88 
89 


48 
49 


1 18 
1 2* 















This wtll entitle a member to a certificate of $1000 
to be paid after death to the legal beneficiary, when- 
ever such death may occur. 

Reliable Agents Wanted Everywhere. 



F. W. FROST, 
BOOK BINDER AND BLANK BOOK 
MANUFACTURER, 

783 Cumberland St., - - Lebanon, Pa* 



Volume VII. 

THE 



Number 4. 



College Forum. 



APRIL, 1894. 



. f CONTENTS : •?• • 



PAGE 

President Bierman, 49, 50 

Reading 50-52 

The Defenders of Our Nation 53-55 

A Misunderstanding 55-57 

Editorials 58, 59 

College Day 59 

Kalozetean Anniversary 59 



PAGK 

Clionian Literary Society ...60 

Philokosmian Literary Society. 60, 61 

College Directory. . 61 

Personals and Locals 61, 62 

To the Pastor 62, 

Advertisements 62-64 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



HARRY LIGHT, 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 



22 EAST MAIN ST., ANNVILLE, PA. 



w 
o 

as 
o 
X 
w 

o 

S5 
<5 

W 
CO 

><~ 

« 



Our shelves are constantly filled with 
New, Second-Hand and Shelf- Worn 



© 

o 

) > 
as 



Together with a Complete Assortment of 

STATIONERY, 

Wall Paper and Window Shades. 

A Selected Stock of the 

LATEST STYLES OF WALL PAPER 

AX D 

DECORATIONS. 



as 

w 

H 

W 

X 

H 
i 

cd 
o 
o 

00 



SCHOOL AND COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS A SPECIALTY. 
C- SMITH, 

C1HTBAL BOOK STQBX, 

ANNVILLE, PA, 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

COLLEGE Hi SCHOOL SUPPLIES, 

INCLUDING 
NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 
OLD BOOKS. NEW BOOKS. 

Cheapest place in the Lebanon Valley to buy your 
Books. 4S~ New and Old Hooks Bought, 
Sold and Exchanged. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY, 

SILVER PLATE t)W AUK. . 

Spectacles a Specialty. 



Fitted to any age, in Gold 
S ilver, Etc 



PERFECT FOCUS AND FIT GU ARANTEED. 



PUBLISHER'S NOTICE. 

A condensed history and geography 
of the United States in convenient form 
at a low price is what every Business 
man, Housewife, Professor, Teacher and 
Student needs for reference and every- 
day reading and study. Such a work 



is " The American Republic," geo- 
graphical and statistical, historical and 
descriptive; size 12x14 inches, 206 
pages, bound in durable cloth, price 
$1.50. For sale only by local and trav- 
eling book agents or sent direct by 
express prepaid upon receipt of price 
by the publishers. 

JOHNW. ILIFF&CO., 

Nos. 110 and 112 Wabash Ave., 
CHICAGO, IUL. 



When you need Books or Stationery of any kiud 
j correspond with or call on us. By so doing yon will 
. secure the Best Goods at the most Favorable 1'rice* 
Stock always Newjind Fresh. Assortment Large, 
i Prices the Lowest. Whether you intend to buy 23ft 

| or $25.00 worth, it will pay you to call to see us. 

[■:•• lu/'."' "'-■/■■••■'.. "V ." i ■ °'.jyH 

Bagster's and Oxford Teachers' Bibles a Specialty. 

J We carry in stock the publications of the U. B. 

Publishing House, such as Otterbein Hymnals, 

Hymns of the Sanctuary, the Books used in t 

three years' course of study, S. S. Music Rooks. 

AGbNTS WANTED to sell the best and most 

popular Lord's Prayer published. Send 75 cents for 

sample copy, worth $2.00. Address plainly 

CRIDER & BROTHER, 

PUBLISHERS OF 




isaac wolf PhotojrraphMamai 

S LEADING CLOTHIER. ! b F 1 

Photograph Family Records, Etc, Etc, 

YORK, PA. 



ONE PRICE ONLY. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
828 CUMBERLAND STREET. 



Please Mention "The College Forum." 




E. BENJ. BIERMAN, A. M., Ph. D., 
President of Lebanon Valley College. 



THE COLLEGE EOKUM. 

LEBANON- VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Yol. VII. No. 4. ANNVILLE, PA., APRIL, 1894. Whole No. 70. 



President Bierman. 

We take pleasure in presenting in this 
number of The Forum, a portrait of our 
President, E. Benj. Bierman, Ph. D. 

Many of our readers will recognize in it 
a familiar face, and in the person it repre- 
sents one of the most devoted friends of 
the institution over which he presides. 
Dr. Bierman has been identified with the 
College from its earliest history, having 
entered into active service in March, 1861, 
less than a year after its founding. He 
assisted in framing the charter, upon the 
basis of which the Pennsylvania Legisla- 
ture granted a franchise investing the in- 
stitution with collegiate authority. 

For thirteen consecutive years he was a 
member of the Faculty, covering the time 
from his first entrance in 1867 to 1880. 
During the first five years he occupied the 
chair of English Language and Literature. 

In 1872 he was elected Professor of 
Mathematics and Astronomy, in which 
position he continued eight years, resign- 
ing in 1880. 

The following ten years he spent in the 
city of Philadelphia, during which he 
taught in a private school and availed 
himself of the privilege afforded in a large 
city of attending special lectures in the 
fine of his chosen profession. Part of 
this time was also given to real estate in- 
vestment enterprises. 

In July, 1890, the Board of Trustees 
called him to the Presidency. 

J- he position is fraught with great re- 
sponsibility, involving the combined qual- 
^acations of the scholar and the financier. 

he history of many of our colleges and 
other institutions of learning has been 
^ e ry largely made up of trial and disap- 
pointment. Lebanon Valley has been no 
x ception,but on the contrary has strongly 
emphasized the general rule. She was 
rj s intended to act in the capacity of 

er vus servorum Dei, and justly claimed 



the support of the Church under whose 
sacred auspices she was called into exist- 
ence. The full measure of devotion has, 
however, not always come from every 
quarter. On the contrary, she has been 
assailed by bitter enemies and often 
wounded in the house of those who at 
least should have been her friends. 

She has suffered from prejudice, private 
jealousies, indifference, distraction and 
almost every other conceivable obsta- 
cle incident to educational enterprises. 
Amidst all she stands, bearing unanswer- 
ble testimony to her internal strength and 
divinely designed mission. 

With a full knowledge of the situation, 
evincing a self-denying devotion that bor- 
ders on the heroic, Dr. Bierman assumed 
the exacting duties now devolving upon 
him. By both nature and training he is 
admirably adapted for the work. Having 
been a close student all his life, a careful 
observer of men and events, with oppor- 
tunities varied and rare, and now being 
fifty-four years of age, he has brought to 
the institution an experience and prepara- 
tion that is invaluable. Naturally he is 
of a sanguine temperament, inclining in 
the affairs of life towards the optimistic, 
which tendency is properly regulated by a 
superior gift of discrimination, inherited 
from the Teutonic stock from which he 
springs. His methods in the manage- 
ment of the affairs of the College have 
received the well-nigh unanimous approval 
of its friends and patrons. The atmosphere 
in which he moves as the head of the in- 
stitution suggests caution on every side. 
With this in mind he has been aggressive 
without being revolutionary, conservative 
without danger of stagnation. 

Socially Dr. Bierman is agreeable and 
entertaining. An acquirement, which in 
any extended conversation on the subject 
of education he unconsciously betraj's, is 
his wide and accurate knowledge of many 
noted men of letters and their writings. 



50 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



During his four years' administration 
most of the more serious obstacles con- 
fronting the College in the past have been 
removed. Her forces are gathering ; a 
greater unity of purpose exists ; her friends 
are increasing ; her alumni and students 
are rallying under her banner ; her finances 
are less embarrassing ; every department 
is receiving a new impetus, and the institu- 
tion is rapidly taking an honorable place 
among kindred educational forces of our 
State. 



Beading. 



BY PROF. J. A. M'DERMAD, A. M. 

There are some persons who, in their 
reading, are guided only by their inclina- 
tions or fancies, and reject all additional 
guidance and restraint, some from mere 
caprice,* and others from a belief that 
counsel and advice interfere with the free- 
dom of the individual taste and the pleas- 
ure of spontaniety. They say, " Read 
what speaks to yoxxv heart and mind, let 
your own feelings be your guide, and leave 
critics and advisers to their narrow or 
prejudiced judgments. Read that you 
may enjoy, and not that you may criti- 
cise ; that you may gather impulse and 
inspiration, not that you may understand 
the reasons or explore the sources of the 
instruction and enjoyment which you un- 
consciously derive from the books in 
which }-ou most delight." The author 
himself on one occasion received advice 
of just about that kind, and that too from 
a source from which a different kind was 
to be expected. 

We grant that there is a degree of per- 
tinency in such advice, but we feel certain 
that to make our feelings and inclinations 
the sole criterion for our reading would be 
to adopt a standard which is both unwise 
and untrustworthy. Our inclinations and 
preferences are as likely to be perverted 
and eccentric in this as in other matters 
of voluntary choice, and need as much the 
guidance of common sense and rational 
discernment in this as in those. If al- 
lowed to follow gratification alone one 
person would engage in one or two sorts 
of reading alone and others in others, and 
thus there is likely to be a morbid taste 
and an unsymmetrical habit of mind ac- 
quired, which results in a distracted state 
of thought and sentiment and is destruc- 
tive of all true mental power and culture. 



If the purpose of reading was only to de- 
rive present gratification and enjoyment, 
we might then adopt some such standard 
as the above, but this certainly is not the 
case. Information and practical useful- 
ness are other and more important ends to 
be secured, and accordingly our reading 
should be regulated with reference to them 
as well as to entertainment. Our mental 
and spiritual aptitudes are very much like 
our physical appetites, preferring to eat 
delicacies and sweetmeats to the exclusion 
of other and more substantial fare, which 
habit, while it might afford present enjoy- 
ment, would not be conducive to the 
proper nourishment and sound health of 
our bodies. 

I grant that we do not derive much 
benefit from the perusal of a book h 
which we do not have any interest or can- 
not read with pleasure, but in many in- 
stances we can educate ourselves to find 
pleasure and profit from the reading of » 
book which does not at first yield them. 
The inclination can be made to obey the 
will and submit to the judgment, which is 
one great object to be gained in any 
course of education that is worth the 
name. To assert that one person cannot 
help another to select and judge of books, 
is in principle to discountenance all in- 
struction and to place a demerit on the 
experience and judgment of those who are 
wiser than we are. 

We assert that the two leading objects 
to be kept in view in arranging a course 
of reading are information and enjoy- 
ment ; and in order to secure these ends 
certain fundamental principles should 
kept steadily in view. The first of these 
which we will name is variety. I a*" 1 
speaking now particularly of our wants as 
college students and general readers. B 
is a well known fact, which goes without 
saying, that a professional man and woman 
is obliged to be very much more special 
and concentrative in their habits of read- 
ing in order to meet the more specifr 1 
demands of his or her profession ; but * 
am speaking now of the general reader 
and the individual in the preparatory 
course of training. Such a person oug nt 
to have a general knowledge upon all cur 
rent subjects of thought and conversation 
If he does not, he is often at a loss ft r 
information on these subjects when he} 8 
asked to converse upon them, and 19 
likely to be judged as ignorant and illitf' 
ate; besides this, such reading gives b 1 " 1 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



51 



a scope of information and versatility of 
thought which is of great practical utility 
to every individual. However, in this 
day of accumulated thought and literary 
and scientific progress, it is impossible for 
any one individual to have an extended 
knowledge of all current subjects, and he 
becomes a drudge and a charlatan who 
undertakes it, and he who does not pos- 
sess such a C3^clopedia of knowledge need 
not for that reason be regarded as unin- 
formed or ignorant. I would say just 
here that it is better to have a fair knowl- 
edge of fewer subjects than a rambling, 
puerile smattering of more. The subjects 
of information on which the general reader 
ought to some extent to inform himself 
are numerous and varied ; but the prin- 
cipal ones may be classed as follows : 
Histoiw, ancient and modern; Philosophy, 
including the Mental and Moral Sciences ; 
iNatural Science and Natural History ; Bio- 
graphy, which constitutes a very fruitful 
field of information ; Political Science ; 
Criticism ; Fiction, as found in standard 
authors; Journalism, including periodicals 
and standard newspapers ; General Litera- 
ture, and especially Religion, which is of 
chief concern to all. Space would not 
permit even if we had the disposition to 
name individual authors on these im- 
portant subjects; but the diligent in- 
quirer will find abundance of material 
given by leading authors on all these 
subjects. 

As the second principle of selection, I 
would say that the student should read 
other authors in connection with the one 
which he is using in class as a text-book 
on any subject. In this way he will get a 
broader knowledge and a more thorough 
mastery of the subject, and he will at the 
same time be freed from the prejudices in- 
cident to the study of a single author. 
Ihe same is true in regard to reading au- 
thors on any of the above subjects. "We 
should not be persons of one book or one 
^ea, but should seek breadth and thor- 
oughness of understanding by a pursuit 
of the subject under a variety of authors. 

In fact we should not on most subjects 
adopt a particular view or theory of the 
matter, because some one author sees fit 
to accept or promulgate it, for if we do, 
We are likely to become narrow-minded 
and prejudiced. The proper method to be 
plowed is to weigh the subject in the 
&ht of the accepted opinions of different 
liters, and then to test and examine it 



with reference to its appeal to truth and 
reason in our own mind, and thus judge 
of the merits of any theory by its own in- 
herent validity. It is in this way that we 
discern the real value of any subject or 
theory, and at the same time acquire a 
degree of independence of thought and 
capacity of discernment which is of the 
highest importance and utility. 

Thirdly. We should keep in mind a 
definite purpose to be held in view in the 
selection of our reading at any particular 
time. Some subjects are much more ap- 
propriate to some occasions or periods of 
our history than others are, and this fact 
should be kept in mind and acted on. 
Our actions and their results in any pur- 
suit or enterprise take coloring from the 
purpose or design which we have in view, 
and in this respect reading is no excep- 
tion. Its value and utilit} 7, is governed 
largeby by the end sought. The design 
becomes the final cause which gives stimu- 
lus, zest and inspiration to eveiy pursuit 
and enterpi'ise in which we are called to 
act, and which gives to effort its charm and 
to genius and enthusiasm their dignity 
and triumph. To be aimless is to be 
reckless, and to be reckless is to take 
from life all its higher and grander quali- 
ties, to deprieve it of its usefulness and 
render it inefficient, worthless and vain. 
Having considered the subject as to what 
book ought to be read, the next subject 
which naturalby presents itself, How shall 
we read ? 

In the first place, we should read with 
attention. This is a rule that takes prece- 
dence of all others. Attention is a habit 
which can be cultivated, and in many 
cases must be cultivated in order to 
accomplish successful reading. With 
maU3 r of us it doubtless happens some- 
times that we read several columns of a 
paper or several pages of a book, and 
when we are done we do not know a single 
sentence of what we have read, simply be- 
cause our mind has been abstracted on 
something else. As a matter of course, 
we derive no benefit from such reading as 
that. Porter says : " The one evil that 
comes from omnivorous and indiscrimi- 
nate reading is that the attention is 
wearied and overborne by a multitude of 
objects that pass before it; that the 
miserable habit is formal and strength- 
ened of seeming to follow the author when 
he is half comprehended, of vacantly 
gazing on the page that serves just to 



52 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



occupy and excite the fancy without 
leaving any distinct and lasting impres- 
sion. If we are too tired to read a book 
of a certain character with attention, then 
we had better take up something lighter 
which will rest the mind and elicit its at- 
tention. If we are too tired to read any 
book correctly, then we had better stop 
entirely. It was said of Edmund Burke, 
who was a great reader and thinker also, 
that he used to read every book as if he 
were never to see it a second time, and 
thus made it entirely his own, a possession 
for life. Secondly, it follows that we 
should read with a certain degree of re- 
spect and deference to the author. In 
reading we, so to speak, invite the author 
to guide us on a- trip of discovery and 
entertainment, and therefore it becomes us 
to behave toward him at least with do- 
cility and courtes}^. If we do not have 
sufficient confidence in his ability or 
character to show him this deference we 
had better decline his company. At all 
events, if we are to get the benefits of the 
occasion we must - disarm ourselves of 
whatever might interfere with our recep- 
tivity and interest. If we do not weigh 
his arguments with candor, and accept 
his facts with confidence ; if we do not 
yield our feelings to his control by that 
pliant sympathy which is requisite for the 
enjoyment of his enthusiasm and the 
ardor of his spirit, and if we do not open 
the avenues of our mind and will to re- 
ceive his conclusions, we will likely only 
scan the page with our eye while our mind 
will be listless and intractible, and our 
feelings will remain dejected and sluggish. 
As we said before, if we are to get any 
benefit from reading, the mind must be 
alert and active to apprehend the author's 
thought, and breathe the vigor of his en- 
thusiasm. Mrs. Browning has said, and 
doubtless from her own experience : 

» We get no good 
By being ungenerous even to a book, 
And calculating profits so much help 
By so much reading. It is rather when 
We gloriously forget ourselves and plunge 
Soul forward, headlong, into a book's profound, 
Impassioned for its beauty and salt of truth. 
'Tis then we get the right good from a book." 

Thirdly. We add another rule, which 
although it seems paradoxical to the 
former one yet really is not so, namely, 
we should read with an independent judg- 
ment and critical spirit. There is a dif- 
ference between a critical spirit and a 



skeptical spirit. The latter assumes be. 
forehand that the author is not reliably 
and that his statements are untrustworthy, 
the former condition is one that naturally 
grows out of an attitude of attention and 
interest, and is one of the highest tributes 
that can be paid to an author. It shows 
a deference that does not merely take for 
granted or receive with credulity, but a 
healthy interest in the subject, although, 
Ave are to be respectful and deferential to 
our author, this does not mean that we 
are to read with a servile and cringing 
credulity, and thus surrender every faculty 
to him to control, and dominate at will. 
This is thinking by proxy. In even' case 
the will should be independent and the 
reasoning powers active and alert to seize 
upon whatever truth or beauty there is 
and to repudiate and resist all that is! 
false or inconsistent. In this way we, 
both do our author more credit and our- 
selves more service than we possibly 
could b}^ any object or credulous habit 
of attention. Milton says : . 

"Who reads 
And to his reading brings not 
A spirit and judgment equal or superior, 
(And what he brings what need he elsewhere?) 
Uncertain and unsettled still remains 
Deep versed in book and shallow in himself." 

We should make what we read ours not 
only by plagiarism or credulity, but by the 
power of an active and living assimilation. 
The mind grows by its own inherent ener- 
gies, but only as those energies are exer- 
cised in a legitimate way ; it does not grow 
by what it arrogates to itself or aggregates 
about itself, but what it assimilates and 
apprehends within itself. It is in this 
way that the mind makes truth its own, 
develops its energies and expands its capa- 
cities, and it is in this way that it increases 
its resources, augments its facilities, broad- 
ens its views, elevates its conceptions andl 
arrives at that remarkable result called I 
culture. 



The Defenders of Our Nation. 



AN ADDRESS BEFORE THE P. L. S. BY J. *• 
WALLACE, '95. 

The name of America, which belong 9 
to us in our National capacity, must 
ways exalt the just pride of patriotism- 

The citizenship of this great Repubh c 
must be the manopy and safeguard of 
who wears it. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



53 



The American citizen, rich or poor, 
native or naturalized, white or colored, 
must everywhere walk secure in his per- 
sona! and civil rights. 

This Republic should never accept a 
lesser duty, it never can assume a nobler 
one, than the protection of the humblest 
man who owes it loyalty — protection at 
home, and protection which shall follow 
him abroad, into whatever land he vs\a,y go 
' upon a lawful errand. So much for this 
government ; but who were the founders 
and defenders of it. 

When we search the annals of its history 
we find its birth to have originated from 
the Pilgrim Fathers, the patriots who in 
1620 landed on this picturesque, grand, 
marvelous, and sublime American conti- 
nent and laid the foundation of this great 
and glorious Republic. These men cher- 
ished and enforced the great principles of 
our Revolutionary fathers — principles of 
libert}*- and law, one and inseparable; the 
principles of the continent and of the 
Union. 

But could I stop here? Could I hold 
out to them, as the result of a long life of 
observation and experience, nothing but 
the principles and examples of great men. 
Who and what are great men ? 
Washington was born on the beautiful 
banks of the Potomac in medium circum- 
stances, but rose like the great eagle from 
the dense forest to the cliffs of the tower- 
ing Andes. Never before had this coun- 
try been blessed with such a sublime hero 
in her darkest hour of peril, and to-day 
we can find recorded on the pages of his- 
tory that he secured the freedom of the 
colonies, founded a new nation, and his 
name shines like a star in all lands, " First 
in war, first in peace, first in the hearts of 
his countrymen," and a ty\>e of purity, 
manhood and patriotism for all lands and 
for all time. 

Lincoln was born in an old log cabin in 
Kentucky, and like a little acorn took 
root in the forest and grew up to be a 
mighty oak, spreading its boughs far and 
Wide over this illustrious nation. He is 
'the man who poured out appeals and ar- 
guments which moved men from their 
seats and settled the destinies of a nation, 
tte is the prophet who warned the people 
■°t the evils that were undermining our 
government, and gave joy and dignity to 
and was the means of freeing four 
JJdlion slaves. He was the saviour of 



this 



nation, and hold our government up 



to that lofty mission which is recognized 
to-day as " liberty enlightening the world." 

Grant was born in Ohio, and was the 
essence of the good old Revolutionary 
stock. He was the soldier who by vic- 
tory in the field gave vitality and force 
to the civil policies which Lincoln ad- 
vised in the Cabinet. He was the giant 
who rose more rapidly than any other 
military leader in histoiy, and in two and 
a-half years was advanced from the com- 
mand of a single regiment to the supreme 
direction of a million men, operating over 
more land than the empires of Germany 
and Austria combined. He was that great 
American soldier whose name shall be 
honored as long as the slavery of human 
beings shall be abhored. 

Who and what are great men ? Wash- 
ington, Lincoln and Grant were golden 
treasures, who stood forth like gigantic 
shades of the first chieftains and sons of 
God, who swept through our fertile plains 
and mountain fortresses to conquer this 
New World ; they were warriors on the 
car of triumph, covered with scars and 
crowned with laurels, famed for their loft}" 
mind, the instigators of this human race 
and the great means of conducting this 
government across the ocean of time. 

So much for these memorable charac- 
ters in American history ; but when I 
glance into the faces of these noble sol- 
diers this evening the pangs of war, as it 
were, rise before me like a dream. 

Here we are in the terrible struggle for 
National life. We hear the sad strains of 
the fife and throbbing drum, and the sil- 
ver voice of the bugle. We hear the 
appeals of orators beneath the quiet stars ; 
we see thousands of »women bowed in 
grief and sorrow, and thousands of men 
raging with the pangs of war. We time 
the tread of marching thousands, where 
the battle surges roll, and we see thous- 
ands* of the dead whose dust we have cov- 
ered with beautiful flowers. We are with 
them when the}- enlist in the great army 
of freedom. 

We see 3 r oung men walk with their 
lovers in lawns whose walks are strewn 
with fragrant flowers. We see them walk 
among the American vine-clad hills and 
groves with maidens they adore. We see 
them in their happy summer days walk in 
quiet woody places, by rippling streams, 
whispering the sweet vows of eternal 
love as they part forever. 

We see mothers kissing the throbbing 



54 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



temples of young men and pleading that 
they should forget the tales of war, but 
think of its terrible end. Men are in their 
cheerful homes, bending over cradles, 
kissing little babes that have their arms 
folded in silent slumber. Some are part- 
ing with mothers whose faces are wrinkled 
by the trials of life and their heads are 
covered with the pearly white snow of age. 

We see the wife standing in the door 
with an infant in her arms, waving a 
handkerchief, crying, " My husband has 
gone and gone forever." 

We see thousands proudly marching 
from the Golden Gate of California under 
the stars and stripes, keeping time with 
the fife and drum, marching down through 
the streets of great cities, through towns, 
across prairies, pushing on with stout 
hearts and American bravery to the red- 
hot plains of the Sunny South — down to 
the field of glory, to fight and to die for 
the eternal right. 

We see brothers .part in their youth, 
locate in different States; one pierces the 
other in the breast with a bayonet in the 
whirlwind of war, looks upon him ; be- 
hold ! " He is my brother ! The same 
sweet smile is on his face that I had 
known in adventurous boyhood, when we 
bathed in the glittering lake by our Spartan 
home. He knew me, smiled faintly, told 
me always to tell the truth, and then as- 
cended the golden stair. 

We see young men lying in the woods 
crying, "6, Mother! Mother! Thou hast 
been a tender nurse to me ; my youth was 
like that of a shepherd lad, who never 
heard a harsher tone than a flute or violin 
note ; but here I am dying in the woods 
with my blood curdling among the leaves." 

We see them in ravines running with 
blood, and thousands marching up to great 
forts to be mown down like golden grain 
in the harvest time. 

We see them torn by cannon balls, cut 
by shells, thousands in Southern prisons, 
whose heads are crowned with failure, 
hatred and starvation ; the news goes 
home that they are dead ; we see the 
mirthful virgin with her golden curls over 
her face to drown the sorrow ; mothers 
fainting away with little children on their 
knees, and see the silver-haired father fall 
to the earth in his last grief. 

The past rises before us, we see thous- 
ands of human beings bound by chains, 
tortured by whips ; we see bloodhounds 
track the 'slaves through the swamps ; 



children sold from the breasts of mothers,, 
and the sacred relations of wife, mother,, 
father and child, trampled beneath the 
brutal feet of might. 

The past rises before us, we hear the- 
roar of cannons and see the bayonets glit- 
ter in the sunlight. There heroes died..: 
Instead of slaves, we now see men, women 
and children. The auction block, slave! 
pen and whipping post have been abol- : 
ished, and instead we see cheerful homes ' 
and firesides, school-houses and books. 

Now came the brightest day that ever ] 
dawned upon the youth of the nineteenth 
century, when Lee surrendered arms at 1 
Appomattox and forever declared the J 
abolition of slavery. 

Now thousands of our American sol- 1 
diers are ushered into eternit}^. They 
died to save this nation — they died for us. 

The exploits of these marvelous charac- 
ters were grand and sublime. The most ; 
magnificent specimens of soldiery in the 
annals of the world's history are found in 
the American soldiers. 

In the Civil War our Northern soldiers 
were not only fighting for splendid cere-i] 
monials and magnificent commemorations 
and gorgeous expositions; but for some- J 
thing towards a grandeur, which was an»J 
nounced by higher than human lips, the 
auspicious promise and pledge of a glori- J 
ous second century of independence and j 
freedom of our country, 

They fought for a government that 
would destroy tyranny wherever it would 
raise its snaky head ; for a nation that 
can hear the faintest cries of its humblest 
citizen ; for a nation that will protect &$, 
freedman standing in the hot sun by his<, 
little cabin as well as it would protect a-i 
Yanderbilt in his palace of marble and| 
gold. 

Our American men were citizen sol- 
diers. I have no right to utter a syllable- 
against the reputation, the character and 
the unquestionable bravery of the profes- 
sional soldiers; but if we look into the-' 
history of the soldiers in this country, 
going back to the Revolutionar} r period 
and coming along through the Indian 
wars, and into the Mexican War, on to 
the late Civil War, it must be admitted 
that the soldiers of these periods, in the 
aggregate, were citizen soldiers. 

In the history of the world the soldiers 
have performed the largest part. They 
were the most powerful factors that have 1 
contributed to the civilization of mankind- 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



It must be admitted that the history of 
civilization has been the history of vio- 
lence. . , . i ^ 

The world began m barbarism, and the 
soldiers have done more than any other 
single factor that has ever existed to over- 
throw barbarism. Going back over the 
Revolution we find that the soldiers of 
the American colonies left the plow, the 
shop, and the quiet walks of civil life; and 
so, coming up through the history of our 
country to the late Civil War, the men 
who wore the blue and grey were citizen 
soldiers. They were nature's picked 
noblemen, strong and brave, left their 
cheerful homes and loved ones to scatter 
the ambitions and dreams of youth to 
take up the sword and musket for the de- 
struction of their fellow-men. The Civil 
War consisted of the greatest intellectual 
citizen soldiery that was ever known 
among the battalions that swept the field 
of war and conquest. 

Think of the terrible charges and blood 
shed at Gettysburg, Antietam and Fair 
Oaks. The past rises before us. The 
thought of these terrible scenes cause the 
hot tears to rush to our eyes and the 
blood tingles to our finger tips. And 
whoever to-day assails the character of 
our soldiers, or attempts to destroy the 
glory of their work and record is an in- 
famous slanderer of human history. And 
to-day, if this government should be im- 
periled, if any government on the face of 
God's earth should insult the stars and 
stripes, it is my honest belief that the men 
who wore the blue and grey would stand 
up shoulder to shoulder, and fight and 
bleed and die for this illustrious nation. 

Thousands of these heroes have died 
for us, . and to-day sleep beneath the 
American sod that they made free, beneath 
the fragrant flowers, the brilliant boxwood, 
the solemn cedars, the mournful hemlocks 
and the weeping willows. They are at 
rest beneath the shadows of the clouds 
and beneath monuments that tower toward 
the heavens. I have one more sentiment 
for the American soldier, " cheers for the 
living and tears for the dead." 

Life is a quarry out of which we are to 
mould and chisel and complete a charac- 
ter.— Goethe. 

Culture means the perfect and equal de- 
velopment of man on all sides.— John 
Burroughs. 



A Misunderstanding. 

A Story of Love and War. 

BY W. ELMER HEILMAN. 

"Van Bernard, I wish you to under- 
stand distinctly that I am at liberty to 
choose my own company, and I do not 
propose that you shall dictate to me 
either," and Ella Gilbert gave her worsted 
an emphatic jerk by way of emphasis : 

" But, Ella, this fellow is a stranger, and 
— I don't like the look of his black eyes." 

Van spoke his convictions, for if his 
feelings had not been hurt by his evident 
interest in the maiden he loved, there was 
something so forbidding about this ele- 
gant stranger, who had been spending the 
autumn among the Pennsylvania hills, as 
to put plain, honest Van on his guard. 

" Harry Dawson is a perfect gentleman, 
and understands how to conduct himself 
in the presence of ladies, which is more 
than can be said of some young men I 
know," Ella retorted, angrily. 

Yan colored at the thrust, but managed 
to say, coolly : 

" You know how people will talk, for — 
well, everybody knows we are engaged." 

Engaged ! Yan Bernard, when did I 
promise to become your wife ? So far as 
I can recollect, you have never asked me, 
and it is not probable that I should con- 
sent to such a proposition without some 
such intimation on your part." 

While Ella was speaking a shadow crept 
over Yan's honest face, and leaving his 
chair he came over and leaned heavily 
against the mantel. When he could steady 
his voice, he said slowly and sadly, "Ella," 
there never was a time when I did not 
look upon you as my future wife, though 
we have never gone through the formality 
of asking and answering that question, we 
understood each other perfectly. Is not 
the engagement ring upon your finger at 
this very moment ?" 

Snatching the ring from her hand, she 
threw it towards him, saying, " So perish 
the last link that binds us together. I am 
glad to be free — to feel that you cannot 
hold me to a bargain that was never made." 

" Ella, you know I do not wish my 
freedom, and you are just as confident 
that I would never try to hold you to an 
engagement of which you are tired. You 
are not yourself this evening. When you 
think over your hasty words you will 
decide differently." 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



"Never! I despise 3^011 and hope you 
will never come into my presence again," 
Ella flashed back. 

Tan took his hat from the table, and 
walked, slowty out of the doorway and 
down the path to the gate. He did not 
go home, but turning into a path that 
crossed the meadow, he wandered aim- 
lessly along until he reached a secluded 
spot, where he sat down to think. From 
his earliest boyhood he had known and 
loved Ella Gilbert. As they grew up to 
manhood and womanhood their affections 
centered more and more in each other, 
and years ago it came to be understood 
that in due course of time they would 
make a home for themselves. Though 
more than ordinarily intelligent, Van was 
only a plain farmer ; but, until the coming 
of Harry Dawson, Ella had been proud of 
his sterling qualities, and the whole wealth 
of her young heart belonged to him. 

Dawson had come to spend the season 
with a friend, and in making love to the 
pretty rustic maiden he had no higher 
motive than to be amused for a few tedi- 
ous weeks. Ella was dazzled by his styl- 
ish appearance, and enjoyed the envious 
glances of her young companions ; but, 
although she wished Van was not so old- 
fashioned, she really loved him as well as 
ever. Once or twice she was tempted to 
call him back and tell him that she did 
not mean what she had said, but calling 
her pride to her assistance, she determined 
to teach him a wholesome lesson. 

" Poor Van ! It is too bad, for I care 
more for him, rough and awkward as he 
is, than for this handsome stranger, with 
all his gold and knowledge of the ways of 
the world," said she to herself, after try- 
ing in vain to find an excuse for her harsh 
words. " But I will let him alone for a 
few days, for he must learn that he can 
not dictate to a Gilbert." 

Van did not come back the next day as 
she had anticipated, so for his special 
benefit she attended the concert in com- 
pany with Harry Dawson. Van was 
there, but away back in a dark corner, 
where his white face did not haunt the un- 
faithful girl, and so heart-sick did he be- 
come at the careless remarks of those 
around him, concerning the turn things 
had taken, that before the entertainment 
was half out, unobserved,- and, stealing 
softly in at the door, he sought his own 
room, and there spent the rest of the 
night contriving plans for his mother's 



comfort, for he had fully determined to 
offer his services to the recruiting officer 
before another sun had set. 

When, in the morning, he unfolded his 
plans to his widowed mother, silent tears 
rolled down her withered cheeks, but not 
a word of complaint did she utter. Other 
mothers were compelled to part with their 
sons, and why should she be spared the 
pain of separation ? It was soon ar-' 
ranged that her son Ben should take 
charge of the farm and its work, and be- 
fore the stars came out that night Van 
had taken the last kiss from the dear old 
mother's lips, and had marched away with 
the boys in blue. He had not spoken a 
word concerning Ella's unfaithfulness, but 
the mother's intuition told her something 
was amiss between them. 

When Ella heard of her lover's enlist- 
ment she wept bitterly, but her pride 
prompted her to conceal her remorse by 
seeming carelessness. After Van was 
gone she flirted desperately with young 
Dawson, and Ben's wife did not think her 
duty accomplished until she had repeated 
her opinion of the girl's conduct to Van. 
So thoroughly indignant was the young 
matron that she even confided to him 
Dame Rumor's report concerning the wed- 
ding that was to take place during the 
holidays. It might all have been well 
had not Van at this juncture implored his 
sister-in-law not to mention Ella Gilbert's 
name at all in the future. So he went on 
believing that Ella— his Ella— belonged 
to another man, and, feeling he was alone 
in the world, became reckless of his life. 

It was in November, 1862, that Ella 
drove him from her presence, and a year 
later he lay wounded and bleeding on 
Lookout Mountain's gory field. Early 
on that memorable day, the color-bearer 
was shot down, and it was Van who saved 
the tattered flag from capture, carrying it 
with him right into the thickest of the 
fight. He was seen to fall amid the storm 
of shot and shell that darkened the air, 
and when the smoke of battle cleared 
away, his comrades took up what they 
supposed to be his mutilated body, and, 
wrapping it in the riddled flag he had 
borne, laid him tenderly in the grave their 
own hands had hollowed. 

But poor Van found a far less restful 
bed than the one, they had prepared for 
him, for wounded, ill and in a Southern 
prison, the scorching sun beat down un- 
mercifully upon him, while his friends in 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



57 



the North thought him safe with God. 
Having learned from a comrade who had 
been brought into the hospital in a dying 
condition that his mother was dead, and 
that the papers had been full of eulogies 
concerning his own heroic end, he deter- 
mined not to undeceive the world, but, 
when the struggle was over, to bury him- 
self in some secluded spot in the Sunny 
South, and to let his old friends and 
neighbors go on believing him asleep on 
the battlefield where he had fallen. He 
was not exchanged until the war closed, 
and then among strangers, he began his 
new solitary life. 

Though Ella feigned indifference, she 
would have sacrificed her life to have 
saved the noble one of her lost friend. 
Even while engaged in playing the part of 
a coquette, her heart was aching for one 
word from the honest, sensible man she 
had sent from her cruelly. Week after 
week and month after month she looked 
in vain for the letter that she hoped he 
would be so forgiving as to write. 

At times she was tempted to lay aside 
her reserve and send him a penitent 
letter, that she was certain would bring a 
reply, but Ben's wife would say that she 
was courting his favor because the city fel- 
low had cast her aside. So it was that no 
explanations were ever made, and when 
the news of Van's noble death came Ella 
was almost prostrated with grief. She 
went around the house pale and wan, and 
at times her friends feared that reason 
itself would be dethroned. But trouble 
I not apt to kill, and poor Ella was 
destined to carry her heavy sorrow many 
long, weary days. Her brothers and 
sisters married, and in clue course of 
time her parents went to join the sleepers 
m the silent city of the dead, and Ella was 
!eft alone in the house that had once been 
so full of song and laughter. 

Three days before the anniversary of the 
battle of Lookout Mountain, thirty years 
alter he had been carried into captivity, 
an uncontrollable longing to look upon 
mm and familiar faces seized Van Ber- 
nard. Before, he had stifled all such de- 
u 'es, but somehow he could not quiet the 
neart-y earnings this time, so his valise 
was hurriedly packed and his landlady 
was informed that he would be absent a 
mrtni gbt An hour later he wag fl • 

northward and homeward. 

thp a + WaS (lawnin g when he stepped upon 
ue station platform of his native town. 



Not wishing to arouse Ben's family so 
early, he took a stroll through the grave- 
yard and down past the old Gilbert home- 
stead. There were many familiar names 
cut in the monuments in the cemeteiy, but 
he only paused long enough to read the 
inscription on his mother's tombstone and 
drop a tear upon her grave. 

The sun was just beginning to tint the 
tree-tops when he halted at the gate lead- 
ing to the porch, where he and Ella had 
spent so many happy hours. But little 
change had taken place in the appearance 
of the old house and its surroundings since 
the da3^ he went away, just thirty years 
before. Opening the gate he walked up 
the path, and was about to occupy a rustic 
seat, which his own hands had fashioned, 
when a woman who had been gathering 
autumn leaves came suddenly from behind 
the old elm tree, and once again Van 
Bernard and Ella Gilbert stood face to 
face. Ella was the first to recover her 
voice, and there was a perceptible tremor 
in her tone as she faltered : 

" Van Bernard ! Has the grave given up 
its dead, or is it a spirit I address ?" 

" It is Van Bernard, flesh and blood as 
of old, who stands before you, Ella; but 
I do not know by what name I should 
address ycm now," Van replied in a voice 
that convinced her that it was no super- 
natural being who had made such an unsea- 
sonable call, but that the real Van Bernard, 
whose face had haunted her for more than 
a score of years, now stood in her presence. 

" Call me Ella, Ella Gilbert, as you did 
in the long — ago," she said, quietly. 

" But I thought you were married — 
Harry Dawson " — 

" Is not, and never was anything to me," 
she answered. " But you look faint ; 
come in and get a mouthful of breakfast." 

" Not now, Ella. Sit down and let us 
understand each other." 

And there, amidst the old familiar 
scenes, the breach of four times seven 
years was healed. All the long, doleful 
past was forgotten in the new hopes that 
had come so suddenly to them. An hour 
later they were still on the porch, forget- 
ful of their breakfast and everything else, 
except that they had found each other, 
and nothing but death would ever separate 
them again. The quiet marriage that was 
celebrated in the old-fashioned parlor that 
night, was as full of love as if there had 
been no gray hairs in the locks of the 
bride and groom. 



58 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



EDITORS. 



H. CLAY DEANER, A. M., 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher. 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 

John H. Matsilles, '95. Ira E. Albert, '97. 

George H. Stein, '97. 

EXCHANGE EDITOR. 

D. S. Eshleman, '94. 



ALOIM EDITOR. 

Prof. John E. Lehman, A. M. 



SOCIETY EDITORS. 
Clionian Society— Miss Estella Stehman, '96. 
Philokosinian Society— Oscar E. Good, '94. 
Kalozetean Society— James P. Zug, '94. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM will be sent monthly for one 
school year on receipt of twenty-five cents. Subscriptions 
received at any time. 

For terms of advertising, address the Publisher. 



Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as 
second-class mail matter. 



JE&ttorfal. 

The report of education at the Penn- 
sylvania Conference was read by Rev. 
Joseph Daugherty, and not by Rev. B. F. 
Daugherty, as stated in our last issue. 
The error was clerical. * 



The twenty-eighth anniversary of the 
Philokosmian Literary Society will be 
held on the evening of Maj- 4. Rev. 
Cyrus F. Flook, of Myersville, Md., will 
deliver the Ex-Philokosmian oration. 



"College Day" will be the minister's 
opportunity for impressing the whole 
community that he is interested in the 
educational work of the church, and to 
instruct the people in their duty to pro- 
vide an education for their own children. 

Lebanon Valley College can be ad- 
vertised on " College Day " as at no other 
time. Five hundred pulpits talking Leb- 
anon Valley College during the month of 
May will bring countless good and be an 
inspiration to the whole church. The 
president, or any member of the faculty, 
will gladly give any aid or information to 
make the day a grand success. 



" College Day " is designed to be a day 
of counting of mercies, of recollection of 
God's grace, of gratitude, of love, of 
praise and of spontaneous sacrifice to the 
cause of God. What a delightful day it, 
ought to be to all Christians. A spring 
tide festival. 



" College Day " will be observed on the 
1st and 2d Sundays of May. If not con- 
venient, a later date in May can be select- 
ed. We publish the circular letters that 
have been sent out to the Pastors an<E 
Young Peoples' Associations of the patro- 
nizing conferences. We hope the day 
will be observed at every appointment. 



The opening of our spring term was J 
attended with an unusual degree of in- 1 
terest this year, and the accession of new 
students is larger than it has been for 
some years. The majority of the new] 
matriculants enter upon the work of a 
regular course of study, which augurs well 
for the College. 

In the Normal department two classes 
are organized* in the study of pedagogics. 

The Senior class of the College has 
wiseh' decided to study in the line of; 
pedagogics that interesting work entitled 
" Educational Reformers," by Professor; 
Quick. 

Gov. William McKinley, of Ohio, 
visited Hamline University last week, and 
was given a most enthusiastic reception. 
To the students he spoke these words: 
" Our educational system is better than 
large armies, and our country will always 
be safe so long as educational opportuni- 
ties are not neglected. I like to see the 
moral side looked after as well as the 
educational side, for without moral char- 
acter we can do nothing, no matter how 
intellectual we may be. Character is the 
best coin for any of us to have ; it always 
passes current, and is never thrown out.'; 
I am always glad to see an institution of 
this kind have its religious side. It used 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



59 



to be hard for a young man to be a reli- 
gious young man, but all this is changed 
now, and there is no excuse for not being 
religious." t 

The sixteenth annual meeting of the 
East Pennsjdvania Branch of the Woman's 
Missionary Association of our church was 
held here on the 18th and 19th inst. The 
attendance was very large, and meetings 
were very good. This, their " sweet six- 
teenth," anniversaiy brought the Associa- 
tion much that will be productive of great 
o-ood to the church and the cause of Christ. 
Too much cannot be said of the success of 
this arm of church work. Their financial 
work especially has brought much en- 
couragement in the face of depressing busi- 
ness. The fraternal greetings from the 
East Pennsjdvania Conference and from 
three sister churches were most impress- 
ive and full of the spirit of the Master. 
The annual address by Miss Minerva 
Early, of Harrisburg, Pa., gave a crown- 
ing completeness to the exercises. 



College Day. 

To the Officers and Members of the 
Young People's Christian Union — 
Greeting: 

We verily believe that God is in the 
great movement of our Young People's 
organizations. 

It has ahead}' demonstrated, and will 
prove more and more as the years go by, 
that it is a mighty force to push forward 
God's kingdom on earth to speedy and 
more glorious triumphs. 

It means a magnificent host of young 
and ardent workers for Christ. It is an 
evangelistic and an educational movement, 
a nd as such we hail it and pledge our 
hearty cooperation. 

We believe also that part of its work is 
therefore in the educational field, and that 
hundreds of young men and women that 
come under its influence will become stu- 
dents in our higher institutions of learn- 
ing. * 

Our own Church Fathers declare the 
w ork of education to be vital and funda- 
mental. Our Bishops in a recent address 
m °st earnestly invite all our preachers 



and people in their respective relations 
and work in the Church to give the 
largest possible cooperation in the obser- 
vance of Educational Day." 

We therefore take the liberty, under 
the direction of the Board of Trustees of 
Lebanon Valley College, to extend to you 
a brother's hand and cordialty invite you 
to join with your pastor on next "Col- 
lege Da}V in the month of May, to secure 
liberal contributions for the only college 
of the United Brethren in the East. 
Help him to make the day for this year 
the brightest and most successful in }-our 
history. Enter upon the work at once 
with the full determination to increase 
your annual contribution manifold. 

May we also kindly suggest that each 
organization assume to raise the sum of 
twenty-five dollars under the plan to raise 
twenty-five thousand dollars of one thous- 
and shares of twenty-five dollars each, to 
aid the College to discharge its indebted- 
ness. 



Kalozeteaii Anniversary. 

The Kalozetean Literary Society held 
its seventeenth anniversary on Friday 
evening, April 6th. The weather this 
time was favorable, and the Society was 
greeted by a large and appreciative audi- 
ence to enjoy the program. The music 
was well selected and creditably rendered 
by the active members of the Society, 
assisted by Messrs. Pennypacker and W. 
H. Kindt. After invocation by Rev. 
U. G. Renn, the following program was 
rendered : 

Quartette— "Merrily Goes our Bark," Leslie. 

Messrs. Kindt, Pennypacker, Mayer and Kindt. 
Invocation. 

Vocal Solo—" Bedouin Love Song," Buck. 

W. H. Kindt. 

Oration— "The Aluminum Age," J F. Zca. 

Eulogy— "G. W. CliiMs," Sheridan Gasman. 

Quartette— "When the Hues of Daylight Fade." 

Emerson. 

Messrs. Kindt, Pennypacker, Mayer and Kindt. 
Orai ion— "Science and Civilization," G A. L. Kindt. 

Essay— "Prison Reform," H. W. Mayer. 

Vocal Duett— ' On the Field o- Glory." . . . Donizetta. 

Messrs. Penny-packer and Kindt. 
Ex-Oration— " The Defense of the Kepubl.c." 

W. H. Kindt. 

'Quartette—" Old Black Joe," Foster. 

Messrs Kindt, Pennypacker, Mayer and Kindt. 

Mr. Zug spoke of the progress of science 
in the nineteenth century in general, and 
then described the method of extracting 
aluminum from clay. After mentioning 
the uses of this metal to equip the German 
cavalry, to make launches for use on the 
lakes, and to equip a ship about to make 
an expedition to the North, the speaker 



60 THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



predicted an almost universal use of this 
light, strong and non-corrosive metal in 
the future. "As the world has passed 
through the ages of stone, bronze and 
iron, so it may yet have its age of alum- 
inum." 

Mr. Garman stated briefly the salient 
facts in the life of George W. Childs, and 
then concluded with a fitting tribute to 
the memory of that great and benevolent 
character. " A millionaire and a phil- 
anthropist whose benefits were thrown 
broadcast from ocean to ocean and from 
the Lakes to the Gulf, he never boasted 
of much giving. Money did not spoil 
him, and praise could not make him vain. 
Of him it can be said that he served the 
highest purpose of his Creator in man. 
His name will shine through future a^es 
as a beacon light to young men." 

Mr. Kindt in a brief manner considered 
the effects of science upon civilization. 
Science was used in its broad sense to 
include all classified knowledge. " The 
effects of moral science for a time were 
dominant, but at a time of great need 
natural science, studied inductively, 
brought to humanity practical appliances 
and enlarged ideals in education. Pro- 
gress in natural science is the condition 
that makes possible the advanced civiliza- 
tion of the nineteenth centuiy." 

Mr. Mayer introduced his subject by 
referring to the wide extent of charitable 
work at the present time, and after com- 
paring the ancient and modern objects 
used in punishment, stated the modern 
efforts at prison reform and suggested 
some methods that would make this re- 
form more efficient. "A criminal does 
not cease to be a man, and is subject to 
the influences that affect men in general ; 
nor is he to be excluded from the" plan of 
salvation, but reformation and not retali- 
ation be our watchword in dealing with 
the prisoner." 

Mr. W. H. Kindt, the ex-orator, re- 
viewed the causes that led to the dissolu- 
tion of European governments, and stated 
the requirements for American perpetuity 
to be (1) Severance of Church and State, 
(2) destruction of the liquor traffic, (3) 
protection of industry, and (4) universal 
education. " While Americans are slum- 
bering the Roman church, on account of 
thorough organization and influence from 
abroad, is rapidly gaining control in the 
large cities." "This seriously threatens 
American institutions." The drink ques- 



tion was discussed at length and in a vig- 
orous manner. " Tariff, both as to polit- 
ical and financial results, is insignificant 
when compared with the enormous evils 
resulting from the liquor traffic." " The 
industry " whose protection was demanded 
was labor. " Everything is protected but 
labor." A strong appeal was made for 
universal education as the " defense of the 
Republic." Brief space does not permit a 
full analysis of the ex-orator's exhaustive 
address. 

The Kalos spared no pains to make the 
anniversary a success, and it must be said 
that they acquitted themselves nobly. 



Clionian Literary Society. 

Virtute et Fide. 



With the opening of the spring term the 
Clionians returned ready to take an active 
part in society work. Most of them spent 
their vacation at their respective homes 
and report a most enjoyable time. 

The recent election of officers for the 
term resulted in the following : President, 
Estella Stehman ; Yice President, Mabel 
Saylor ; Critic, Anna Wilson ; Treasurer, 
Ella Pennypacker; Recording Secretary, 
Ella Black; Corresponding Secretary, Ida 
Bowman. 

Miss Strickler, '94, and Miss Wilson, 
'94, spent Sunday, March 25th, with Miss 
Gingrich. 

We are pleased to hear that Miss Bertha 
Mumma, who has for the last two years 
been teaching public school at Hummels- 
town, expects to enter school again this 
term. Miss Mumma was a member of 
society during the year '92, and through 
her returning we are sure of an active 
society worker. 



Philokosmian Literary Society. 

Esse Quam Videri. 



Our Society work for this term had a 
very pleasant beginning. 

After a brief vacation, which some of 
the boys spent at their homes, others vis- 
iting friends, and still others remaining 
at the College, we were again found in 
our accustomed places ready for another 
term's literary duties. The Annville Post, 
G. A. R., met with us upon the occasion 
of our first session for the term. 




THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



61 



The programme for the evening was 
entirely patriotic. 

The relative ability of McClellan and 
Grant as generals was discussed. Supe- 
rior ability in planning a campaign was 
ascribed to the former, while the superior 
practical ability and the greater energy of 
the latter were assigned as reasons for his 
greater success as a general. In the de- 
bate, the question whether the Civil War 
or the Revolutionary War did more for 
the cause of liberty was considered. It 
was maintained that the Civil War gave 
universal freedom in the United Spates 
and freed the greater number; that it 
saved the nation by overthrowing slavery, 
while the Revolutionary War rendered 
the condition of the slave more intolera- 
ble. On the other side it was argued that 
the Revolutionaiy War gave liberty of 
conscience and commercial libert}^ and 
also freed a more intelligent people than 
did the Civil War. 

It was further argued that neither the 
North nor the South gained any liberty 
through the Civil War. 

At the close of the exercises Mr. Geo. 
D. Rice in behalf of the Grand Army men 
expressed his appreciation of the exer- 
cises of the evening, closing with a beau- 
tiful poem, which beautifully illustrated 
the characteristics of military life. 

President Bierman, Professor Shott and 
a number of other visitors, besides the 
members of the Gr. A. R., were present, 
and all were highly pleased with the 
exercises. 

We are glad to state that two new 
names have been recently added to our 
list of members. They are the names of 
Messrs. Saylor and Myers. 

Our membership during the year has 
been continually increasing. 

This is a great source of encouragment 
to us, showing that our efforts are being 
appreciated, and that new students re- 
cognize the fact that the P. L. S. offers 
opportunities for mental culture and dis- 
cipline which can not be obtained in the 
class room. 

Be sure, my son, aud remember that 
the best men always make themselves. — 
Patrick Eenry. 

Every man has a weak side. Every 
^ise man knows where it is, and will be 
sure to keep a double guard there. — 
Mason. B 

Our acts make or mar us. We are the 
children of our own deeds Victor Hugo. 



College Directory. 
Faculty. 

E. BENJ. BIERMAN, A. M., Ph. D m 

PRESIDENT, 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 
H. CLAY DEANER, A. M., 
Professor of the Latin Language. 

JOHN E. LEHMAN, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 
Rev. JNO. A. McDERMAD, A. M., 
Professor of the Greek Language. 
JOHN A. SHOTT, Ph. B., 
Professor of Natural Science. 
MARY E. SLEICHTER, A. B., 
Professor of English Literature. 

CARRIE M. FLINT, 
Professor of Instrumental Music. 
GERTRUDE ALBERTSON, 
Professor of Harmony and Fine Art. 

HARRY E. TROUT, B. E., 
Tutor. 

Literary Soeieties. 

CLIONIAN. 
Miss ESTELLA STEHMAN, President. 
Miss IDA BOWMAN, Secretary. 

KALOZETEAN. 
JAMES F. ZUG, President. 
SHERIDAN GARMAN, Secretary. 
PHILOKOSMIAN. 
JNO. R. WALLACE, President. 
W. E. HEILMAN, Secretary. 
T. M. C. A. 
JOHN H. MAYSILLES, President. 
JAY W. YOE, Secretary. 

T. W. C. A. 
Miss MAGGIE STRICKLER, President. 
Miss ESTELLA STEHMAN, Secretary. 



Personals and Locals. 

President Bierman was ill with a severe 
cold during the first week of this month. 

Mr. Albert Craumer, who was a student 
at the College in 1878, visited the College 
on the 13th inst. Mr. Craumer belongs 
to the firm of Erb & Craumer, Lebanon, 
Pa., whose advertisement appears in an- 
other column. 

There have been over thirty accessions 
this term. Their personnel is dignified 
and graceful. Reports are very compli- 
mentary of their scholarly attainments 
and deportment. 

A class of sixteen began Latin this 
term. 

D. G. Kreider was married, on the 24th 



62 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



inst., to Miss Anna Doeris, of Fulton, 
Mo., at the bride's home. After an ex- 
tended Western trip, they will reside on 
College avenue, where a home has been 
handsomely furnished. 

On the 10th, 11th and 12th inst., we 
had the heaviest fall of snow the oldest 
residents know of. It continued forty- 
eight hours without abating. It was 
nearby two feet deep here, while at Mt. 
Gretna, onby seven miles distant, it was 
forty inches. Much damage was done to 
the trees in the campus. 

During the sessions of the Women's 
Missionary Association many of the dele- 
gates and friends visited the College. 

John H. Maysilles, '95, will attend the 
College Y. M. C. A. presidents' conference 
to be held at Pennsylvania State College, 
the 19th inst. 

A large number of students spent their 
Easter vacation at their homes. 

Presiding Elder D. P. Lowery conduc- 
ted chapel services on the 19th inst. 

Messrs. C. B. Pennypacker, John Steh- 
man and Albert Myers, of Mountville, 
Pa., were in attendance at the Kalozetean 
Anniversary ; also S. P. Bacastoe, '93, 
of Sand Beach, Pa., and Horace W. 
Crider, 93, of York, Pa. 

Miss Mattern, of Mt. Carmel, Pa., 
visited friends at the College on April 6. 



To the Pastor. 

Dear Brother: A number of the en- 
closed circulars have been mailed to the 
presidents of the Young People's Societies 
on the different charges throughout the 
cooperating conferences of Lebanon Val- 
ley College. 

We feel that our young people should 
become interested in our educational work, 
for the three-fold reason that it will be 
helpful to the College, be of great benefit 
to the Church, and prove a blessing to 
themselves. 

We also recognize the fact that your 
relation to them gives you an advantage, 
which no one else has, in making the work 
in which we wish to enlist them a grand 
success ; and feeling that you are in 
hearty sympathy with the educational 
work of the Church, and anxious for the 
success of Lebanon Valley College ; and 
placing great confidence in your skill and 
judgment in such matters, we appeal to 
you to enlist and direct our young people 
in this work. 

If we could succeed in raising only five 



cents per member on an average, we shoi 
realize a handsome sum for our work 
be much encouraged. We would kin< 
suggest an all-day effort on "College 
Day ;" sa}r, for instance, a discourse fol- 
lowed by an envelope or basket collection 
in the morning; and some special service 
by our young people, followed by the col- 
lection in the evening, devoting the entire 
proceeds to this cause. Of course your 
circumstances and judgment must de- 
termine the plan you should follow. 

Let this great arm of Church work be 
well fostered and strengthened, and it will 
prove an incalculable blessing to the 
Church and the world. 

Trusting that we shall share your full 
sympathy and cooperation, and praying 
the great Head of the Church to bless you 
richly in all your labors, we remain, 
Yours in His name. 

E. B. Kephart, 
E. Benj. Bierman, 
I. H. Albright, 
M. J. Mumma, 
Jno. E. Lehman. 



Rensselaer <fc 



Polytechnic'^ 
Institute, 



Troy, N.Y- 

Local examinations provided for. Send for a Catalogue. 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SUEGEONS. 

OPPO. COOK COUNTY HOSPITAL, CHICAGO, ILL. 

The Winter Term begins September. 1894, and ends April. 
1895. Total fees $105 each Winter Term, and a laboratory 
deposit which is returnable. Four annual graded courses, 
with advanced standing for graduates in Pharmacy and Uni- 
versity preparatory courses prior to the study of Medicine. 
Clinical and laboratory facilities unsurpassed. 
For annual circular of information, apply to 

W, E. QUINK, M D., 

Pres. of the Faculty, 
813 WEST HARRISON ST. 




T 





& CO., in. 



Engravers ■•< Stationers, 

1022 WALNUT STREET, 

Philadelphia 




THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



63 



CUMBERLAND VALLEY RAILROAD. 
v TIMETABLE— Oct. 1, 1893. 



Down Trains. 



dig 
Acc. 



Ky'e 
Exp 



No.l2;No. 2 No. 4 No. 6 



A. M. A. M. 



Lv 



Winchester 615 



Martinsburg 

1 Hagerstown j 

" Greencastle 

" Chambersburg 6 10 

" Shippensburg 6 32 

" Newville | 6 53 

" Carlisle 718 

" Mecbauicsburg 7 42 

Ar. Dillsburg 

" Harrisburg I 8 03 

" Philadelphia I 11 25 

" New York j 2 03 

" Baltimore i 11 15 



00 
40 
08 
30 

8 55 

9 15 
8 40 

10 04 



11 48 

12 08 
12 30 



1 25 
4 03 
3 10 

A. M. | P. M. 



10 30 

1 25 
4 03 
3 10 

P. M. 



6 50 
9 38 
6 45 

P. M. 



Ev'g 


N'gt 


Mail 


Exp 


No. 8 


No. 10 


P. M. 


P. M. 


2 30 


3 20 


3 20 


4 50 


4 10 


7 10 


4 36 


736 


S 00 


8 00 


5 30 


816 


5 51 


8 53 


6 17 


9 20 


6 43 


9 43 


7 05 


10 05 




A. M. 


11 15 


4 30 


3 50 


7 33 


10 40 


6 20 


P. If. 


AM. 



Additional trains will leave Carlisle daily except Sundny at 
5:55 a. m., 7:68 a. m., 3:40 p. m., stopping at nil intermediate 
stations, arriving at Harrisburg at 6:40 a. m., 8:03 a. m., 4:30 
p. m. 

Evening Mail runs daily between Harrisburg and Cham 
bersburg. 



Up Trains. 


Win 


Me's 


Hag 


Ev'g 


C'bg 


N. O. 


Acc. 


Exp 


Acc. 


Mail 


Acc. 


Exp- 




No. 1 


No. 3 


No. 5 


No. 7 


No.17 


No. 9 




P. m. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


Lv. Baltimore 


11 40 


4 45 


8 53 


11 20 


2 15 


4 23 


" New York 


8 00 


12 15 




9 00 


200 


2 06 


" Philadelphia 


11 20 


4 30 


8 50 


11 50 


2 20 


4 30 




A. 11. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 




4 40 


753 


12 40 


3 40 


520 


8 00 
















" Mechanicsburg 


5 03 


8 13 


103 


4 01 


5 41 


820 


" Carlisle 


5 30 


8 36 


129 


425 


6 05 


8 44 




555 


900 


152 


4 55 


6 36 


9 08 


" Shippensburg 


6 15 


9 21 


213 


5 10 


6 57 


9 29 




6 40 


9 43 


2 35 


5 35 


720 


9 50 




7 02 


10 04 


3 01 


5 50 




10 12 




725 
9 30 
11 00 
a. m. 


10 27 

11 12 

12 00 
A. M. 


325 


6 18 

7 02 
7 50 

P. M. 




10 35 

A. M. 




P. M. 


Ar. Winchester 






P. M. 



W. F. BKCKEK. 



J. P. BKUCGEB, 



Additional trains wil leave Harrisburg daily except Sunday 
at 10:35 a. m.. 10:45 p. m., arriving at Carlisle at 11:20 a. m., 
11:30 p. m., stopping at all intermediate stations ; additional 
train will leave Hagerstown at 8:00 a. m.. arriving at 11:00 
a. m., stopping at all i ntermediate stations. 

Pullman PalacesieepingCars between Hagerstown and New 
York on Keystone Express and Night Express east, and on 
Memphis Express and New Orleans Express wi st. 

Pullman Sleeping Cars on Night Express and New Orleans 
Express between Philadelphia and New Orleans. 



IF you wish to advertise anything anywhere at any time, 
XT write to GEO. P. ROWELL & Co., No. 10 Spruce Street, 
New York. 

EVERY" one in need of information on the subject of ad- 
vertising will do well to obtain a copy of "Book for 
Advertisers,"' 3«8 pages, price one dollar. Mailed, postage 
Paid, on receipt of price. Contains a careful compilation from 
the American Newspaper Directory of all the best papers 
and class journals; gives the circulation rating of every one, 
ana a good deal of information about rates and other matters 
Pertaining to the business of advertising. Address HOW- 
ELL'S ADVERTISING BUREAU, 10 Spruce Street, New 
York. 

DESIGNING. WOOD ENGRAVING. 

PHOTO-ENGRAVING. 



COMPANY, 
*14 to 130 S. 7th Street, PHILADELPHIA. 
COLLEGE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

~DAVID BRANDT, 

BOOT • AND • SHOEMAKER, 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 

^STUDENTS' WORK A SPECIALTY. 



Eastern Book Store, 

315 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
BOOKS AJsJ) STATIONERY. 

Special Untes to Students. 

Second-Hand School Books a Specialty. 

WRITK FOR PRICKS. 

EL A. LOSER, 

GROCERIES AND CONFECTIONERY, 

OYSTERS AND ICE CKEAM, 

AJsnNViLiL/E, pa. 



jg B. MARSHALL, M.'D., 

No. 34 East Main Street, 

ANXVILLK, PA 

ISAAC MANN & SON, 

LARGEST CLOTHIERS, 

834 Cumberland Street, 

LEBANON, I* A. 

THE BEST GOODS FOR THE LEAST MONEY. 

T R. McCATJLY, 
DAILY MEAT MARKET. 

GOOD MEAT. LOW PRICES. AWNVILLE. FA. 

JOHN TRUMP, 

J BOOT AND SHOE MAKER, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

WS. SEABOLD, 
. DEALER IN 

Drugs, Medicines, Perfumery and Toilet Articles, 

No. 2 East Main St., Annville, Pa. 




CAN I OBTAIN A PATENT? For a 

Srompt answer and an honest opinion, write to 
IIJNN & CO., who have had nearly fifty years' 
experience in the patent business. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. A Handbook of In- 
formation concerning Patents and how to ob- 
tain them sent free. Also a catalogue of mechan- 
ical and scientific books sent free. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice in the Scientific American, and 
thus are brought widely before the public with- 
out cost to the inventor. This splendid paper, 
issued weekly, elegantly illustrated, has byfarthe 
largest circulation of any scientific work in the 
world. S3 a year. Sample copies sent free. 

Building Kdition, monthly, $2.50 a year. Single 
copies, '£ti cents. Every number contains beau- 
tiful plates, in colors, and photographs of new 
houses, with plans, enabling builders to show the 
latest designs and secure contracts. Address 
MUNN & CO., NEW YORK, 301 BROADWAY. 



64 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



^yiLLIAM KIEBLER, 
SHAVING AND HAIR DRESSING, 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop, Annville, Pa. 

ADAM B. HESS, 
OFFICE AT THE HOTEL EAGLE 
OMNIBUS TO ALL TRAINS. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

JACOB SARGENT, 
FASHIONABLE TAILOR, 

18 and 20 Main St., Annville, Pa. 



D 1 



\R Y GOODS, NOTIONS, GRO- 
CERIES, BOOTS and SHOES, 

—AND— 

GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS. 
«r. ss. shopb, 

ANNVILLE, PA 

SNOW FLAKE PRINTING HOUSE, 
A. C. M. HEISTER, Prop., 
FINE JOB PRINTING, 

35 S. White Oak Street - - Annville, Pa. 

WILLIAM WALTZ, 
FASHIONABLE 
HAIR CUTTING AND SHAVING SALOON, 

West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
H. H. KREIDER. JXO. E. HERR. 

KREIDER & CO., 
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OP 

Hard & Soft Coal, Grain, Seeds Salt & Feed. 

Office : Railroad Street, near Depot, 
Telephone Connection. ANNVILLE, PA. 

THE BEST STOCK, THE LOWEST 
PRICES IN 

FURNITURE JJOSEP T A 1 Ji7r LE R.s. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

M. H. SHAUD, 

DEALER IN 

Gold Watches and Jewelry, 

Wholes ale and Retail Dealer in 
FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYS- 
TERS AND CREAM. AMMVILLE, PA. 

S. M. SKENE'S BAKERY, 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

FRESH BREAD, CAKES AND ROLLS, 

One Door West Penn'a House, Annville. 

S. WAGNER, 

— ■>■>• Headquarters r or -<<--— 

GROCERIES, CONFECTIONERIES 

OYSTERS, FRUITS AND NUTS. 
Restaurant Attached. Meals at All Hours. 

12 West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



If you want to Buy a Hat rignt, and a ngnt Hat, or anytningii 
Men's Furnishings, 

GO TO 

Successors to RAITT &, CO., 
Eighth and Cumberland Sts., Lebanon, Pa. 

ANNVILLE, PA., 

Dealers in Dry Goods, Notions 

and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home-made, 
Ingrain and Brussels Carpets. You buy Cheaper 
from us than away from home, and have a large 
stock to select from. 



TIKES 

U. B. MUTUAL AID SOCIETY 

OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

HOME OFFICE, LEBANON, PENNA. 

Chartered by the State Legislature, March 11, 1869. 
Positive amounts guaranteed and claims paid in 
full. 

Benefits of $1000 insurance secured for $8.fl0. 
Reciprocal Circle Insurance,new and very popular. 

Invested Assets $146,809.94 

Contingent Assets 116,970.00 

Assessment Basis 5,295,000.00 

Death Losses Paid 6,774,123.01 

THE PLAN". 

The payment of EIGHT DOLLARS on application, 
FIVE DOLLARS annually for lour years, and there- 
after TWO DOLLARS annually during life, witn 
pro rata mortality assessments for each death ot a 
member insured lor $1000, is as follows: 



Age. 


Ass't 


Age. 


Ass'mt 


Age. 


Ass'mt 


20 


65 


30 


75 


40 


90 


21 


66 


31 


77 


41 


di 


22 


67 


32 


79 


42 


94 


23 


68 


33 


81 


43 


96 


24 


69 


34 


83 


44 


98 


25 


70 


35 


85 


45 


1 00 


26 


71 


36 . 


86 


46 


1 06 


27 


72 


37 


87 


47 


1 12 


28 


73 


38 


88 


48 


1 18 


29 


74 


39 


89 


49 


1 24 



Age. 

50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 



Assm'T 



This will entitle a member to a certificate of $109° 
to be paid after death to the legal beneficiary, when- 
ever such death may occur. 

Reliable Agents Wanted Everywhere. 

F. W. FROST, 
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783 Cumberland St., - - Lebanon, P»« 



ling in 
Pa. 



Volume VII. 



Number 5, 



THE 



College Forum 



flAY, 1894. 



. 4. CONTENTS : •»• • 



Reading— The Imaginative 65-67 

Lynch Law 67-69 

Ode for Decoration Day 69 

Chance to Go to College . .69, 70 

A Pleasant Time ™ 

Presented with a Chair 70 

A Sell ; 71 

Notes 71 

Editorials 72 



Exercises of the Week 72, 78 

Philokosmian Anniversary 73-76 

Alumni.. • W 

College Directory 76 

Philokosmian Literary Society 76, 77 

Personals and Locals 77 

Exchange Notes... 77, 78 

Advertisements t. • .79, 80 



pa. 



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FACULTY OF LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

President BIERMAN. 
Professor Deaner. Professor Lehman. 

Miss Flint. Mrss Si.eichter. 

Miss Albertson. 

Professor McDermad. Professor Shott. 



THE COLLEGE FOEUM. 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Vol. VII. No. 5. ANNVILLE, PA., MAY, 1894. Whole No. 71. 



Reading— The Imaginative. 



BY PROF. J. A. M'DERMAD, A. M. 

Books, with respect to their subject- 
matter, may be divided into two classes, 
viz., those which are based on objective 
reality, and those which are the product 
of the imagination. With respect to the 
former, there can be no doubt that their 
value is in direct relation to the value of 
the subjects they treat and the ability and 
accuracy with which they set forth the facts 
and arguments with which they deal. In 
proportion as they thus deal truly with 
their themes and present logically their 
arguments, do they become sources of au- 
thority and funds of information. What, 
however, is to be said of the second class ? 
Of this differences of opinion are enter- 
tained by different persons, as might in 
reality be expected on a subject of such 
diversified character. Of course, what- 
ever in imaginative literature ministers to 
the excitement of the vicious, degrading 
or malignant elements of our nature, is 
mjurious and cannot be too strongly de- 
nounced and repudiated, for it is sure to 
exercise a pernicious influence on the 
nrind of the young. But we do not be- 
lieve that the large part of our standard 
^orks of fiction are of this class. It is no 
argument against the merits of a book to 
say that it is a novel or a poem, nor can 
« be shown on that account that it is less 
favorable to morality and virtue. The 

act that some of our greatest and best 
titers have indulged more or less in 
agmative representation, and have won 

arne thereby, shows that thev have sup- 
1 «Md a normal demand of the human mind. 

Do t ° nly is !t cleJir that fiction and 
iu r y ma y exert a good influence upon 
m-acter; it fe equally true that they do 
kJjJS* exert an influence which is both 

to T)l an . d elevatin g« Let us > in order 
Piace this subject before us in proper 



light, examine briefly the philosophy 
which underlies this dominant fact. It is 
evident to every enlightened thinker that 
our lives are not circumscribed by the en- 
vironments of the material and the actual, 
but beyond the sphere of the experimental 
and objective there stretches the azure 
vault of the ideal and subjective, starlit 
with the visions of hope, exultation and rap- 
ture, and toward which with its transcen- 
dent enthusiasm the mind is forever borne 
onward in the limitless sweep of its im- 
measurable capacities. In the midst of 
our material activities and surroundings, 
our spiritual nature, by its inherent ener- 
gies, continually seeks to transcend the 
limits of its material mould, and to revel 
in the cycle of its own inherent faculties 
and powers. It delights to create for 
itself fairer mansions and ampler possibil- 
ities than it beholds in the environments 
of its present material surroundings or 
the circumscribed conditions of objective 
realit}^. It is sometimes an advantage to 
us to pass from the facts and experiences 
of the material world and the conditions 
and occurrences of actual life, to a contem- 
plation of conditions that are subjective 
and scenes that are ideal. It is important 
sometimes to withdraw the mind from its 
association with the environments and 
limitations of the world of objective fact, 
and turn its energies upon itself and allow 
it to create for itself its characters and 
ideals, circumstances and their outwork- 
ings and results. In this way the mind 
expands its own energies, pushes out the 
boundaries of thought, elevates its con- 
ceptions and broadens its aspirations. In 
fact, we do not find our desires satiated 
and our ambitions gratified with what we 
possess at the moment of experience, but 
are always reaching forward to some 
greater good, some ampler enjo3'ment. 
Neither are these desires and aspirations 
always an empty dream or an idle fancj r , 
but rather point toward a legitimate end 



66 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



of our nature, and prompt us to steer our 
course toward the star of hope which for- 
ever shines before us to illumine our sky. 
They spur us on to enlarged activity, hold 
before us noble and lofty motives of ac- 
tion, and if properly guided lend dignity 
to our labor, give grace and charm and 
vigor to our lot, and inspire our energies 
to noble and praiseworthy objects. They 
are the wings by which hope mounts to 
the realities of things unseen, which 
makes the actual possible, and opens up 
immensit}^ to our view. Without them 
we could and should only grovel and plod 
on day by day in one treadmill round of 
existence. Without them we should not 
aspire to anything nobler or higher, but 
our mental existence and experience could 
then fitly be compared to a world without 
an atmosphere or an earth without a sky. 
But with these impulses to give glory to 
life and lustre to toil, the material and 
the psychical, the real and the ideal, the 
actual and the possible, are blended in our 
lives in indissoluble union and ineffable 
harmony. The heights continually rise 
before us, but they are not unattainable 
heights. All progress is made by passing 
from the actual to the possible, by step- 
ping from one height of vision to an- 
other, even in the scale of illimitable 
gradation. Whatever position we may 
occupy, there still looms up a radiant 
cycle beyond, luminous with the lustre 
of transcendent hope and radiant with the 
sublime rapture of ecstasy and indulgence. 
Dr. Porter says, " With what joy does the 
delighted pupil of romance tread the com- 
mon earth now glorified for the first time 
to his anointed eyes, or look out upon the 
transfigured sky now that heaven is seen 
to glow beyond it!" This makes what 
was common and dull before glow with 
new fervor and shine with new grace ; life 
takes on a new meaning, enthusiasm 
a new zeal, and effort a new inspir- 
ation. 

It is to this element of our nature that 
poetry and fiction principally address 
themselves, and in which they find their 
correlate and confirmation. They, as it 
were, lift us for the time being above the 
world of ordinary sense and the plane 
of material limitations, and give us a 
sense of the infinite, and a vision of the 
transcendent and ideal. He may here ap- 
propriately quote the words of Longfel- 
low relative to this subject as given in 
Sandolphon: 



"And the legend I feel is a part 
Of the hunger and thirst of the heart ; 
The frenzy and fire of the brain, 
That grasps at the fruitage forbidden. 
The golden pomegranates of Eden, 
To quiet its fervor and pain." 

Now hy these intuitions and aspirations 
we have have seen that the mind does 
have, and will manifest in some way either 
for benefit or loss, and it is the province 
of the poet; and writer of fiction to direct 
and educate these faculties to their proper 
and legitimate ends. He is to set before 
the mind proper ideals, right modes of ex- 
ercise and enjoyment, and lofty senti- 
ments and perceptions. He is also to ex- 
pose those sentiments and practices which 
are vicious and degrading, and denounce 
those tendencies and habits which are cor- 
rupt and depraved. In this way some of 
the noblest and grandest elements of onr 
nature will be trained to their loftiest and 
most efficient exercise. 

Perhaps the best way to keep the young 
from reading literature which is really 
pernicious, as the dime novel and the 
murder stoiy, giving some sickly senti- 
mental nonsense or a blood-curdling 
story of violence and crime, is to furnish 
them with literature which is really lofty 
and excellent. However, we may say of 
even the best of this class of literature as 
of many other valuable things, that it may 
be and very often is abused by excess, 
and thus instead of fostering a lofty and 
generous enthusiasm it creates a senti- 
mental dreamy habit of thought. 

The moral effects of all kinds of reading 
cannot but be very great and exert an im- 
portant influence on the thought and 
habits of the reader. This it does both 
directly and indirectly — directly when 
it addresses well reasoned arguments to 
the understanding ; indirectly when its 
influence upon the principles is secondary 
and unnoticed. Hence it is a good rule 
that in reading we should first make an 
acquaintance with the author's principles. 
Reading the works of a skeptic or an in- 
fidel, even though treating on science or 
history, may exert a lasting pernicious in- 
fluence on the mental and moral character 
of him who reads. It is well, therefore, 
to fortify one's self against even the very 
appearance of evil by guarding against 
reading the works of such authors at 9m 
or, if reading them, at least by being fore- 
warned against their danger. On the 
other hand, the works of those authors 
whose creed is sound and whose morals 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



67 



are correct, is a powerful stimulant to- 
ward the cultivation of right character 
and morals. Such poems as those of Mil- 
ton, Addison and Scott; such works of 
fiction as those of George Eliot, Dr. Hol- 
land, Hawthorne, and Lew Wallace; such 
works of science as those of Dana, 
Agassiz, McCosh and Porter; and such 
historians as Bancroft and Hildreth are 
of great importance in moral training. 



Lynch Law. 



0. E. GOOD, '94. 

Innocence must be protected ; guilt ex- 
posed and punished. This is the wish of 
■every patriotic and intelligent citizen ; it 
is the foundation of all orderly society ; 
and, so far as conduct is concerned, it is 
the purpose for which civil law exists. 
Perfection is a stranger to human institu- 
tions. Nevertheless, it is the end sought, 
though only approximately obtained. If 
lynch law is to become a substitute for 
law, it can only justly do so when it can 
he shown that it approaches more closehy 
to perfection in the accomplishment of 
the purposes for which laws have been 
enacted. Let us, then, in the first place, in- 
quire whether lynch law guarantees suffi- 
cient protection to the innocent. When 
a mob, furious by reason of some terrible 
outrage committed in their vicinity ; fren- 
zied still farther, perhaps, by the use of 
alcoholic stimulents, overpower the offi- 
cers of the law, seize the supposed perpe- 
trators of the outrage, inquiries with 
reference to the innocence or guilt of their 
unhappy victim are destined to a very 
indifferent consideration from their crazed 
intellects. And, if it be granted that the 
mob contains cool headed men, what op- 
portunity has the poor wretch in their 
power to prove his innocence upon such a 
notice as mobs give ? What means has he 
to produce a witness that might possibly 
establish his innocence beyond question'? 
A * April, 1893, a negro named Hudson, 
was imprisoned at Salina, Kan., charged 
Wl th a terrible assault upon a Mrs. Frost 
^ her baby. Mrs. Frost swore posi- 

ively that Hudson was the guilty person. 
Ihe negro escaped lynching only by 

«J most determined opposition of the 

do Kf Later {t wns P roved beyond 
11 ot that he was seven miles from the 
* en e of the crime at the time the outrage 
as committed. The woman may have 



thought she was right ; but she was mis- 
taken, as naturally she might be, and it 
ma.y be safety asserted that many a poor 
wretch has suffered violence upon far less 
positive testimony than that against 
Hudson. It has been said that "Mobs 
hang first and pronounce sentence after- 
wards," and this incident illustrates its 
truth. We cannot look to lynch law for 
protection for the innocent. 

Does it then expose and punish guilt, 
and thus tend to prevent crime? One 
thing is certain ; it creates a contempt for 
law and lawful authority. It begets a 
spirit of lawlessness, and what sane mind 
would suggest lawlessness as a remedy for 
lawlessness ? Who will contend that 
stealing will prevent theft, murder pre- 
vent murder — in short that vengeance is 
the proper means of redress for injuries 
received ? There is in lynching a danger- 
ous tendency. It is a growing evil. But 
a few years ago lynching was resorted to 
only in cases where the most revolting 
crimes against women and little children 
had been committed. Soon it was extended 
to aggravated murders. Then the perpe- 
trators of lesser crimes were lynched. As 
more trifling crimes became punishable by 
lynching the ferocity of the lynchers in- 
creased. Shooting and hanging no longer 
satisfied the fierce passions of these fiends 
in human form, and burnings and tortures, 
which would have added to the glory of 
even the diabolical exterminators of here- 
tics in the sixteenth century, will ever 
stand out upon the pages of histor}' as 
monuments to our shame. 

Let us carry this practice to its legiti- 
mate conclusion. Lynching is based upon 
vengeance. The most abandoned crimi- 
nal has his friends — usually dangerous 
friends, too. They resolve to avenge his 
death. They form a second mob, the 
lynchers being the first. Let this practice 
continue indefinitely, and we need not be 
surprised to see the feudal times repeated, 
to see might again become the only right, 
and the weak crushed by the power of the 
strong. 

Lynching has not }-et produced this ex- 
treme condition, it is true ; but it cannot 
be denied that toward such an end it is 
tending, and even now much vengeance is 
wreaked upon American citizensby their 
fellow-citizens for real or pretended in- 
juries under the pretense of punishing 
crime. 

Instead of protecting the innocent, 



GS 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



lynch law hangs, shoots and even burns 
innocent and guilty alike. Instead of 
preventing crime, it is a source of far 
greater crimes, and its ultimate end, un- 
less checked, is anarchy. 

Nevertheless, this state of things exists. 
How shall it be met? Punishment of 
lynchers may be very well. While that is 
just and necessary, it alone will not suf- 
fice. Every possible excuse offered in 
justification of lynching must be removed. 

Why any longer should we be blind to 
our national follies ? For instance, a 
man without wealth or influence kills 
another in a brawl and is hanged. His 
relatives and friends notice that an im- 
portant personage, guilty of a like offense, 
tried by the same courts, is acquitted. 

These are the men, who, conscious of 
their own wrong treatment, become the 
enemies of society, head mobs and wreak 
vengeance under pretence of punishing 
crime. Every law-perverting influence 
adds to the fury of the lynchers. Every 
time the so-called criminal lawj^er covers 
himself with glory by defeating the ends of 
justice, another link in the chain of lynch 
law has been forged. The race conflict in 
the South must also be held accountable 
for a large share of this evil. We as 
Americans should blush with shame so 
long as it can truthfully be said that re- 
spectable Southern whites regard or pre- 
tend to regard the blacks as destitute of 
all delicacj'- of feeling, and consequently 
the most revolting crimes committed 
against them are said to be of trifling con- 
sideration, while the same crimes com- 
mitied by negroes against the whites, 
because of the finer feelings of the latter, 
are looked upon as the most shocking 
barbarities, so heinous, indeed, that lynch 
law alone can deal sufficiently severe 'with 
them. What system of ethics can justify 
such a distinction ? Shall the white man 
of the South be allowed to continue giv- 
ing lessons to his darker brother in social 
depravity and then lynch him for becom- 
ing proficient in the lessons taught him ? 
Was ever greater injustice practised upon 
man ? Can the race problem ever be set- 
tled upon such a basis ? Remove condi- 
tions like these, and lynching will naturally 
cease for want of fuel to feed the flame. 

Our criminal statistics are appalling. 
We have double the number of murderers 
of the most criminal country in Europe. 
Even Italy and Corsica are far beneath 
us. Russia, Mexico and China, in proper- 



tion to population, have far less violence. 
In 1884 there were 103 legal executions 
and 219 lynchings in the TJnited States ; 
in 1889, 98 legal executions and 175 lynch- 
ings. In 1880 we had 4,000 murders; in 
1891, 6,000. One murderer out of 50 was 
executed, the balance are still at large. 

These figures are sufficient to suggest 
the cause and the remedy for lynching. 
With these facts before us, in the face of 
this great national disgrace, what becomes 
of our boasted superiority of civilization. 

Free American citizens hanged, shot 
and burned without trial, openly in defi- 
ance of law, the perpetrators unpunished, 
public sentiment dangerously contami- 
nated — are these factors of a superior 
civilization? Nevertheless, with the dark- 
ness gathering about our social horizon, 
there comes a gleam of light. The good 
sense of the American people has always 
prevented evils from passing beyond their 
control, and in like manner, it is to be 
hoped, will they deal with lynching. 

To exterminate this evil Ave need law 
equably enforced against lynchers and all 
other criminals as well. It is also neces- 
saiy that some elevating influence be 
brought to bear alike upon the white and 
black populations of the South ; upon the 
former that they set a better example for 
the latter, and upon the latter that they 
cease their outrageous treatment of the 
former. A strong public sentiment is 
necessary for the accomplishment of these 
ends. For the creation of this public 
sentiment we must look to the business 
men, the corporations, officers of the law. 
the press, the pulpit, political conventions 
and to all good citizens, and right nobly 
are these influences being used to create 
a pure public sentiment. The ministry 
is beginning an aggressive warfare against 
this monster evil; the press decries it; 
officers of the law in high authority and 
good citizens generally are voicing their 
sentiments against it, and even political 
conventions have not entirely neglected 
to insert in their platforms barriers 
against the reign of violence. All these 
influences united with others still avail- 
able, moving steadily and irresistibly on- 
ward, will, we may hope, speedily termi- 
nate mob violence, wipe out our reproach 
among nations, and win for us the favor 
of a just and justice-loving Deity ; and 
then will the Stars and Stripes triumph- 
antly wave over a land, which, stretch- 
ing from ocean to ocean, from the 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



69 



Great Lakes to the Gulf, has freed itself 
from the germs of anarchy, a land where 
law and order has triumphed and where 
liberty untainted is the inheritance of 
every citizen. 

Ode for Decoration Day. 



VOICE OF 1861. 

The din of battle and of strife, 

The flash of shot and fall of shell, 
The noisy drum and piping fife 

Cast o'er our land a dark'ning spell. 
The sound was that of civil war, 

Whose steps were hea.rd with awful tread, 
As it approached the cottage door, 

Filling the inmates' souls with dread. 

voice of 1865. 

So for a space of five long years, 

A maddened havoc reigned supreme ; 
While slaughtered sons and mothers' tears 

Were lost in death's dark chilly stream. 
But now the cruel strife is o'er, 

The cause of God and freedom won ; 
The battle-cry is heard no more, 

Another fight for right is done. 

VOICE of 1894. 

In freedom and in peace to-day, 

Our blessed land remains secure ; 
For civil struggles stand at bay, 

And, no more, hardships we endure. 
Among the nations of the world 

We hold unbounded sway ; 
And everywhere our flag's unfurled, 

Since liberty has gained the day. 

VOICE OF THE DAY. 

Oh ! you who live in this free land, 

So full of happiness and peace ; 
Be glad that now so joyous and grand, 

She from war hath a sure release. 
But honor those who bravely fought, 

And then at last so nobly died, 
f o save our land from that dark blot, 

Wrought by slavery's bloody tide. 
And let the grave of ev'ry one 

Be decked with floral tributes rare, 
In honor of their glory won 

For freedom's cause, which is so fair. 



R 



Chorus, 
bells of liberty. 



W$ out > ye bells of liberty, 



Rin 



out with joyousness and mirth ; 



* oretell the bliss that yet shall be 

Art a11 tlie llations °f the earth. 
Alike by thine own loving clasp 
Are ruled the fetter' d and the free, 
' nose hands in one unbroken grasp 
United evermore shall be. 

N. C. Schlichter, '97. 



Chance to Go to College. 



EX-PRESIDENT JAMES M'COSH, OF PRINCETON 
COLLEGE. 



Education is a link between angels and 
en — Exchange. 



There is at this moment a vast number 
of young men all over the country who 
have a deep and burning desire to have a 
college education, but, who from strait- 
ened circumstances, know not how to ob- 
tain it. 

The aspirant will first have to look out 
for a school where the branches leading to 
a college entrance are taught. It is ne- 
cesssary that he should have some teacher, 
professional or non-professional, to start 
him. If he can continue with his teachers 
he should do so. But if he cannot he 
may, to a large extent, educate himself. 

While he is pursuing this course, with 
a teacher, if possible, without a regular 
instructor, if he cannot have one, let him 
send for a college catalogue, which he will 
get for nothing or for a trifle, and let him 
examine it carefully in order to direct his 
studies. 

In nearly all American colleges there are 
scholarships which may not always sustain 
him, but will help him and at least pay his 
tuition. Let him apply for one of these, 
and hy perseverance he is sure to get it. 
By means of the catalogue, or by private 
inquiry, he will find what the expenses of 
the college are for the year. There are 
good colleges in which he can struggle 
through for $300, or even $200, a year in 
addition to his scholarship. 

In the summer vacation of three months 
he may be able to get remunerative work 
in some house of business, say as a clerk 
or temporary assistant ; in the harvest 
field, which will give him health; in hawk- 
ing books, which will show him the 
country ; as waiter in a hotel or in some 
chance job, any one of which will give 
him a knowledge of the world and busi- 
ness habits to make his scholarship money 
available for good. 

If his means fail him he may retire from 
college for a year or two and engage in 
some useful employment, to return with 
perhaps a more mature mind. 

Give us a young man with fair talents, 
with good moral character and with per- 
severance, and under the good providence 
of God, which he should always seek to 
watch over him, he is sure to succeed, in 
spite of all discouragements and diffi- 
culties. 



TO 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



"When I was professor in Queen's Col- 
lege, Belfast, Robert Hart, who had been 
the first student of his year and the first 
in my class of philosophy, came to me 
after graduating and said : " You have 
given me a high education, but I do not 
know what to make of it." 

I asked him to what denomination he 
belonged, and he told me that he was a 
Methodist, and I suggested that he might 
become a Methodist minister. But he 
replied that he had no call. I inquired 
whether he would go on to law, and he 
said, " I am the son of a working miller. 
The training for law is very expensive, 
and my father has no more money to 
spend for me." I told him I would keep 
his case before me. 

Shortly after, the distinguished states- 
man, Earl Clarendon, asked our President 
to send up a student to compete for a 
position in the consular service in China. 
I got him appointed our candidate, and 
he stood first in a competition open to 
every college in the British dominions. 

He went to China, rose to be a high 
mandarin, became collector for the whole 
external revenue of China, was appointed 
by the British government ambassador to 
China, was made a baronet by Queen 
Victoria (Sir Robert Hart), established 
himself a university to give Western 
learning to the Chinese, and is now 
acknowledged to be about the ablest and 
most influental man in that great empire. 

I have spent thirty-six years of my life 
in teaching students. Now when I have 
to cease from this work I have great sat- 
isfaction in writing this paper to stimu- 
late young men to devote themselves to 
study and thereby seek to rise to posi- 
tions of usefulness. — Chelsea High School 
Beacon. 



A Pleasant Time. 

On Saturday evening, April 6, the 
College parlors were the scene of an un- 
usual amount of gayety, all occasioned 
by an invitation from the Y. M. C. A. and 
Y. W. C. A. to the old and new students, 
as well as the Faculty, to spend the even- 
ing with them at that place. 

The guests were met at the door by 
Miss Stehman, who ushered them into the 
presence of the Reception Committee, 
Miss Strickler and Mr. Maysilles, Presi- 
dents of the Associations. After the 
usual formality on such occasions, Presi- 



dent Bierman made a few remarks on 
Association work in general. The even- 
ing was then given up to having a pleasant 
sociable time. 

One feature of the evening was the 
writing of several poems, to which each 
person contributed a line without know- 
ing what had preceded it. Some very 
unique productions resulted from it. 

Another feature was the half-hour con- 
versation on given subjects. This game 
was progressive, and only five minutes 
were given to one person and one subject 
Miss Kephart was voted to be the most 
interesting conversationalist among the 
ladies, and Mr. J. R. Wallace among the 
gentlemen. 

Everything passed off merrily, and 
about nine o'clock refreshments were 
served in the form of .ce cream and cake. 
This seemed to be one of the most pleas- 
ant features of the occasion, and, it is 
needless to say, was willingly participated 
in by every one present. 

Soon all the guests departed, having 
spent a most delightful evening in com- 
pany with these two organizations. 



Presented With a Chair. 

Last Thursday evening Prof. M. S. 
Taylor, A. F. Weaver and F. B. Fleming,, 
a committee from the 0. TJ. A. M., of 
Shippensburg, proceeded to the Normal 
School, and Prof. Taylor, acting as spokes- 
man, presented Prof. H. U. Roop with a 
handsome revolving office chair, in recog- 
nition of the masterly sermon he had 
preached to the 0. U. A. M. in a body at 
the Methodist church the previous Sab- 
bath morning. Prof. Roop was taken 
entirely by surprise, but managed to make 
it clear to the committee that the chair 
was something he had long desired, and 
he very much appreciated the source 
whence it came and the kindly apprecia- 
tion that prompted the gift. 

Without exception the members of the 
0. TJ. A. M. were highly delighted with 
Prof. Roop's sermon, which was prepared 
especially for them, and which was pro- 
nounced one of unusual eloquence, and 
by unanimous consent " passed around 
the hat " among themselves. The receipts 
enabled them to purchase a very fi»| 
chair, which is of the high back design 
and :dso to make it more comfortable by 
the addition of a headrest. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



71 



A Sell. 

VS. L. V. C. 

At the close of an eventful day 
Two college girls in negligee, 
With their hair put up in kids and braids, 
Looking for all the world like old maids. 
Kit on her couch in silence lay, 
Trying to dream her toothache away ; 
Bert still flitting from room to room, 
Looking out on the silvery moon. 
Tired and worn and sleepy are they 
At the close of this eventful day. 

'Tis drawing hard toward the hour of ten ; 
Steps are heard in the hall, and then 
Miss Sleichter blandly handed a card ; 
Kit and Bert jumped up with a start ; 
Two gents in the parlor Mr. M. and T. 
Have called for the girls in negligee. 
Goodness gracious what's there to do? 
It seemed for a moment no one knew ; 
All the girls in the building came 
To take a part in this "Bona fide" game. 

Quick as thought they aided in dressing ; 
Kit, says Bert, sure this is a blessing ; 
There's nothing like having friends in need ; 
These they say are the friends indeed. 
All in a bustle, all in a flurry, 
Running to and fro in a hurry ; 
Combing and dressing, and fixing the girls, 
Out came the kids, up rolled the curls, — 
Ready ; with thanks, and now " Au revoir" 
Sailing along toward the parlor door. 

By virtue of age, says Bert, you rap ; — 

With a toss of the head and a saucy snap, 

By virtue of a longer acquaintance, /say, 

You rap, so just come along this way. 

Bert summoned all the courage she had ; 

Hark ! there now is a gentle rap ; 

Back flew the door as if by dint, 

''Terra firma,"— there stood Miss Flint ! 

>^ys Bert demurely is Mr. M. in? 

Why no, of course not, responded Miss Flint. 

Now I know you'll surmise the rest, 
Of course the gentlemen were " Non est ;" 
Constantinople says Kit to Bert ; 
| his is a sell ; now don't say a word ; 
•Just then a peal of laughter began ; 
As back from the balustrade all of them ran ; 
A he two girls wended their way up stairs, 
laking in all the fun their full shares. 
£loss, the vixen, has no excuse ; 
surely she had a hand in the ruse, 
ttark ! « Sotto voce," I hear a refrain- 
says Bert I'm tired and sleepy I am ; 
f^t said, as she donned her negligee, 
iNow wasn't this an eventful day? 



. f want m y k°y to become a blaok- 
"Mh I would let him go through college. 

sm™ an has a right to be merely a black- 
, ^hjlie must be a man and citizen. — 

J - B. Vincent. 



Notes. 

The world is a looking-glass, and gives 
back to every man the expression of his 
own face. Frown at it, and it will in turn 
look sourly upon you ; laugh at it and 
with it, and it is a jolly, kind companion ; 
and so let all young persons take their 
choice. — Thackeray. 

A pronounced vein of humor must cer- 
tainly have run through the curate who 
said to his flock : " I fear, when I ex- 
plained to you in my last charity sermon 
that philanthropy was the love of our 
species, you must have understood me to 
say ' specie,' which may account for the 
smallness of the collection. I hope you 
will prove by your present contributions 
that you no longer labor under the same 
mistake." 

A Boston girl's version of " Twinkle, 
Little Star:" 

Scintillate, scintillate globule orific, 
Fain would I fathom thy nature specific, 
Loftily poised in the ether capacious, 
Strongly resembling a gem carbonaceous. 
When torrid Phoebus refuses his presence 
And ceases to lamp with fierce incandescence, 
Then you illumine the region supernal, 
Scintillate, scintillate semper nocturnal. 

— Exchange. 
One-third of the university students of 
Europe die prematurely from the effects 
of bad habits acquired while at school ; 
one-third die from the want of exercise ; 
and the other third govern Europe. — Ex- 
change. 

There are three important factors 
necessary to success — namely, piety, per- 
severance, and a blameless life. — High 
School Times. 

It was at a banquet. Numerous toasts 
had been proposed, when a gentleman 
of note arose and proposed the toast, 
" Woman ! without her, man would be a 
savage?" The next morning's paper, in 
its account, reported the toast as. 
" Woman, without her man, would be a 
savage." — Exchange. 

Jones: "I think my wife would make 
a first rate member of Congress." Jones' 
Friend : " Wlr^ ?" Jones. " " Because she 
talks so easily and so long on the money 
question." — Detroit Free Press. 

Junior Partner. — Our traveller ought 
to be discharged. He told one of our 
customers that I was an idiot. 

Senior Partner. — I shall speak to him 
and insist that no more office secrets be 
divulged. — Exchange. 



72 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



EDITORS. 



H. CLAY DEANEK, A. M., 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher. 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 

John H. Maysilles, '95. Ira E. Albert, '97. 

George H. Stein, '97. 

EXCHANGE EDITOR. 

D. S. ESHLEMAN, '94. 



ALCMM EDITOR. 

Prop. John E. Lehman, A. M. 



SOCIETY EDITORS. 

Clionian Society— Miss Estella Stehman. '90. 
Philokosmian Society— Oscar E. Good, '94. 
Kalozetean Society— James F. Zug, '94. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM will be sent monthly for one 
school year on receipt of twenty-flve cents. Subscriptions 
received at any time. 

For terms of advertising, address the Publisher. 



Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as 
second-class mail matter. 



Efottotfal. 

With this issue a number of names will 
be dropped from our subscription list. 
We are sorry to lose any subscriber, but 
without the subscription price being paid 
we cannot afford to send it. 



The admitting of women to the aca- 
demic course of the University of Virginia 
on the 12th inst. is the first instance in 
which a Southern university has conceded 
to woman her ability to stand on an 
equality with man. 



Baseball has received more than usual 
attention this spring. The games played 
have been unusually interesting and quite 
professional. It -is expected that during 
Commencement week there will be several 
games played on the campus. 



The Peace Association of Friends in 
America offer a prize of $75 for the best 
essay, $50 for the second best and $25 for 
the third best essay on " War inconsistent 
with the teaching and spirit of Christ and 
hence unwise and unnecessary." The es- 
say must be written by a student attending 
some college in the United States, and 



must contain not less than five thousand 
words nor more than eight thousand. 
The essa}' should be in the hands of the 
Secretary, Daniel Hill, Richmond, Incl., 
by the first of September, 1894. Full 
name and address should be inclosed with 
essay on a separate sheet. 



The High School Commencement of 
North and South Annville was held in 
the Town Hall on the 11th inst. Prof. 
Snoke, County Superintendent, gave the 
annual address. Nearly one-third of the 
class have entered the College, and con- 
template completing a course. 



We are delighted in giving the readers 
of the College Forum, in this issue, a 
portrait of our Faculty. We believe that 
many of the students of other years and 
friends generally of the College will wish 
to preserve this issue, hence we are pre- 
pared to furnish extra copies. Price five 
cents. 



Exercises of the Week. 

The Commencement exercises will begin 
June 10th. The usual excursion orders 
can be secured from the President. The 
following is the program for the week : 

Sunday, June 10. 
10 a. m. — Baccalaureate Sermon by Rev. 
George A. Funkhouser, D. D., Union Biblical 
Seminary, Dayton, O. 

2 p. m. — Bible Normal Union Graduation. 
7:30 p. m.— Annual Sermon by Rev. Isaac H. 
Albright, Ph. D. 

Monday, June 11. 
7:30 p. m.— Commencement of the Music 
Department. 

Tuesday, June 12. 
9 a. m. — Annual meeting of the Board of 
Trustees. 

7:30 p. m.— Annual Association Exercises. 
Orator, Rev. J. George Johnson, Ph. D.; Es- 
sayist, Miss Mary M. Shenk, B. S.; Poet, Prof. 
Jno. E. Lehman, A. M. 

9:30 p. m. — Alumni Banquet. 



THE COLLEGE FOBUM. 



Wednesday, June 13. 

2:00 p. m. — Class Day Exercises. 

8:00 p. m. — Annual address before the Lit- 
erary Societies by Hon. H. Willis Bland, Judge 
of the Courts of Berks County, Beading, Pa. 

Thursday, June 14. 
9:00 a. m. — Commencement of the College. 
Orations, Conferring of Degrees and Announce- 
ments. 



The constant drop of water 

Wears away the hardest stone ; 
The constant gnaw of Towser 

Masticates the toughest bone ; 
The constant cooing lover 

Carries off the blushing maid ; 
And the constant advertiser 

Is the one who gets the trade. 

— Wahoo Wasp. 



Fhilokosmian Anniversary. 

The twenty -seventh anniversary of the 
Pkilokosmian Literary Society was cele- 
brated on Frida}* evening, May 4th. The 
"boys" succeeded in making this anni- 
versary one of the most successful in the 
society's histoiy. The rostrum of the 
chapel was most tastefully decorated 
with potted plants under the direction of 
Miss Albertson. The society's shield was 
suspended in the recess, while beneath it 
were placed the letters "P. L. S.," made 
of cut flowers of pure white on a dark 
background. 

The chapel was well filled with an 
appreciative audience, and at the ap- 
pointed hour the members were ushered 
id the chapel, followed by the speakers 
& dc1 officers, who occupied seats on the 
rostrum. 

Mr. J. K. Wallace, President, then ex- 
tended the usual greetings, followed by a 
selection of music, when Rev. E. S. Bow- 
Dian offered the invocation. 
After another selection of music. David 
Eshleman delivered an oration on 

MOHAMMEDANISM. 

Id substance he spoke as follows : 
. ' The civil and religious liberty of Amer- 
ica guarantees to all persons within her 
porders the right to worship God accord- 
ln » to the dictates of conscience. As a 
result, nearly all the Protestant and 
Catholic faiths are represented. 

■Recently Mohammedanism, the great 



unitarian religion of the East, has invaded 
our land. This religion was founded in 
622 A. D. by Mohammed, a heathen claim- 
ing lineal descent from Ishmael. Mo- 
hammed claimed to have received a reve- 
lation from the angel Gabriel. He began 
his work as a religious reformer, and at 
first displayed no impure motives, but de- 
generated and became the slave to ambi- 
tion and passion, and used the sword for 
the spread of his religion. After his 
death his religion spread with great 
rapidity, until now it has under its control 
nearly 200,000,000 souls. 

The Mohammedan religion is one of the 
three monotheistic creeds which sprang 
from the Semitic race. Its beliefs are 
founded upon the Koran, the Mohamme- 
dan Bible. This book is the supreme 
rule in all matters of religion, as well as 
law and philosophy. It is the most 
powerful rival of the Bible. The funda- 
mental doctrine of Mohammedanism is 
the unity of God. In addition to these, 
there are other articles of faith, such as 
the Prophet's Eternal Decrees of God, the 
Judgment Day, etc. The Koran denies 
the Trinity, Divinit}^ of Christ, and the 
Atonement. It substitutes Mohammed 
for Christ in most of His offices. Some 
of the practical duties of Mohammedanism 
are confession of God and Mohammed as 
His prophet, prayer at least five times a 
day, alms, pilgrimage to Mecca, etc. In 
addition to these, the moral code demands 
honesty, modesty and decency, fraternity 
and kindness. It forbids music, gambling, 
drinking of intoxicating liquors, etc. Its 
morality in regard to polygamy, divorce 
and slavery is opposed to the morality of 
the New Testament. The Mohammedan 
law is based upon the theory that right 
and wrong depend upon legal enactment. 
An act is right because God has com- 
manded, and wrong because He has for- 
bidden it. The Mohammedan does not 
distinguish between the will and the de- 
sires and passions, but makes them one 
and the same. While there is a broad 
ground of sympathy between this great 
religion and Christianity, the two are ex- 
clusive of and irreconcilable with each 
other. It cannot be regarded, since it de- 
nies the divinity of Christ, as anything 
but a, form of heathenism. Christianity 
should not join hands with it, but resist it 
to the utmost." 

Followed by an oration by Mr. William 
H. Kreicler on the subject of 



74 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



GLIMPSES AT HAWAII. 

The speaker gave the location and ex- 
tent of the Hawaiian Islands, an account 
of the discovery of them by the Spaniards 
early in the fifteenth century, and later 
the discovery by Captain Cook in 1778, 
which resulted in the islands coming in 
connection with the rest of the world. 

The name Sandwich was given to the 
islands by Captain Cook, in honor of 
Lord Sandwich, of England. However, 
at present the name Hawaii is generally 
used to designate the group. 

Hawaii has a great variety of climate, 
on account of its high mountain ranges. 

The inhabitants of the islands destroyed 
all their idols in 1819. One year later 
seven missionaries were landed upon the 
islands. 

In 1825 the Ten Commandments were 
used as a law by the government, and the 
native language was reduced to a written 
form. When Catholicism desired to es- 
tablish her missions upon the islands she 
was checked, but France finally came to 
her aid. The government upon the arri- 
val of the missionaries was similar to the 
feudal of ancient European monarchies. 

In 1854 the United States government 
negotiated with the Hawaiian government 
for annexation. The attempt failed. 
However, in 1875, a treaty for commercial 
reciprocity was ratified by both countries. 
After this treaty the islands had unprece- 
dented prosperity, trade increased to eio-ht 
times what it was before the treaty. 

After the death of King Kalakua in 
1890, there being no heir to the throne, 
his sister Liliuokalini was elected to the 
vacant chair. 

At first her government was favorable, 
but soon she fell a victim to corruption. 1 
She chose her counsellors from the lower 
and debased elements of the natives. 

She finally united her political fortunes 
with the opium ring and a lotterv charter, 
and determined to force upon the people 
a new constitution, which should disfran- 
chise the white citizens and make the Su- 
preme Court the creature of the Crown. 
This constitution was strenuously opposed 
by the best people. 

The queen proclaimed the new consti- 
tution on January 14th, 1893, and the 
opponents resisted it by appointing a 
committee of safety to take action. Jan- 
uary 16th the queen publicly proclaimed 
she would not make any changes in the 
constitution. January 17th the provis- 



ional government was organized wfl 
James B. Dole as president. The 
visional government read a proclam 
deposing the queen and establishing a 
visional government. The queen yielded 
in the evening of the same day. 

The small force of marines and soldiers 
were landed by the United States W 
ter as a protection to American life 
property. 

The provisional government was re 
nizecl by the United States and all for 
powers. Likewise a treaty of annexa 
was submitted to the United States, 
on February 15th President Hani 
submitted it to the Senate. President 
Cleveland, two days after inauguration, 
withdrew the treaty from the Senate and 
appointed James H. Blount, of Geor~' 
to investigate the situation in Ha 
Mr. Blount investigated the situation, 
was partial to the queen. 

Mr. Willis was then appointed as Un 
States Minister, with special instruct! 
from the President. Mr. Willis found 
impossible to carry out the instructions, 
and reported to the President, who re- 
ported to Congress. No definite action 
being taken by Congress, the islands 
apply to America for annexation, as it is 
the only republic having intercourse with 
them. 

The American school system has been 
employed on the islands sixty years, while 
by property interests, commercial associ- 
ations, political education and the general 
prevalence of American laws aiuf ideals, 
the islands have become thoroughly 
Americanized. A number of the popula- 
tion put down as natives are of American 
parentage and educated in American ideas 
and sentiments. 

One of the foremost reasons for annex- 
ation is, if it takes place, the government 
and crown lands will be sold to American 
and Christian Caucasian people, prevent- 
ing the islands from being overrun 
Asiatics. Hawaii is destined to become 
the central commercial power of the 
Pacific. Our population is rapidly on the 
increase, and with its growth will come an 
increase in manufactures ; we must have 
an outlet for this production, and this will 
naturally be wherever American enter- 
prise and the American flag shall hold » 
commanding position. To-day more than 
eighty per cent, of the trade of the islands 
is with the United Stales, and this per 
cent, is rapidly on the increase. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Can we allow the opportunity of annex- 
ation pass Ity and allow the islands to fall 
into the hands of an European govern- 
ment ? America desires to be arbiter in 
the destinies of these islands ; she should 
not shirk the responsibility of giving 
them a good and stable government under 
the American flag. Let us hope the 
present administration will perform this 
one noble act for our country, namely, 
the annexation of these islands. Then 
will the American flag float unmolested 
over them, and Hawaii justly be styled 
the " Paradise of the Pacific." 

The Eulogy was delivered by Mr. Oscar 
E. Good on 

WILLIAM, THE SILENT. 

The speaker, after referring to the bene- 
fits derived from the study of the past, 
named his hero, William the Silent, and 
the date and place of his birth, Dillenburg, 
Nassau, April 16, 1533. Then followed a 
brief account of his early education and 
political advantages. The dazzling splen- 
dor which he might have enjoyed as the 
agent of tyranny was placed in strong 
contrast with the sacrifices and perils he 
was obliged to encounter as the champion 
of liberty. 

His history was then briefly traced from 
the time of his espousing the cause of 
liberty to the time of his assassination 
and death, July 10, 1584. His character 
as a soldier, statesman and gentleman was 
next discussed. As to his generalship, it 
was shown under what disadvantages he 
labored in comparison with the well- 
equipped forces of his opponents, and this 
was given due consideration in the esti- 
mate of his military ability. Special 
prominence was given to his statesman- 
ship. The secret of his success here lay 
lu his keen powers of penetration, his 
caution and his wonderful power of will. 
As a gentleman he was a patient Chris- 
a man of liberal ideas far in advance 
of the age in which he lived. Special 
nonor is due to the possessor of such 
traits when we take into consideration 
Jne debasing ideas which, in his time, held 

he human mind in subjection. In his life 
ue was a benefactor of the human race, 
ancl at his death the friends of liberty 
ever ywhere were stricken with grief. 

Ihe Critique was delivered bv Mr. 
^annual F H u Won J. W. Roberts' book 
entitled : 



LOOKING WITHIN. 

" Looking Within" is artistic and origi- 
nal and charms the reader with its grace 
of style, the beautiful sentiments and their 
fine spiritual feeling. It is an able reply 
to the book called "Looking Backward.*' 
All that taste can suggest and talent and 
skill accomplish in the art of bookmaking 
has been wrought into its pages. Mr. 
Roberts, instead of trying to court the 
favors of any party, launches boldly and 
patriotically out upon the great wide sea 
of capital and labor, and with magnani- 
mous skill assails any guilty side. He 
clearly shows that " Looking Backward" 
has been the bane of this Nation. Few 
books have less lingering by the way ; so 
little to cumber the mind as it moves for- 
ward toward the goal of thought. Rest- 
fulness and ofttimes forgetful fascina- 
tions are found in incidents and side 
issues. The nature in which the author 
discusses the questions of capital and 
labor, and their being controlled by the 
government, as Mr. Bellamy advocates, 
are marked with unbounded skill. The 
beauty, finish and truthfulness of the vol- 
ume, in every respect, is well-nigh unsur- 
passed. A refined literary taste breathes 
forth its artistic skill from eveiy page. 
All the evils of the past, present and pro- 
bable future are hung up in the gallery,, 
simply to shed side-lights for the reader 
to solve the great strike problem. " Look- 
ing Within" will speak loudly to the 
present age, with a message needful for 
every age. If the book is read, it will be 
a pioneer in settling strikes in a healthy 
way, for the power of genius is in the 
book and in one of its best forms. 

The ex-Philo. oration was delivered by 
Prof. Cyrus F. Flook, editor of Myers- 
ville Guide, Myersville, Md.. on 

THE TRUE SOLUTION. 

Among other things he said : " It is 
customary for the ex-orator to sa} r some- 
thing about the Philokosmian Society. 
Our motto is sufficient ; it speaks for it- 
self. All men are affected for good or 
evil. The weak perish, the strong sur- 
vive. Man must combat evil. This is 
the test of character. True conduct is 
two- fold. You and I may be better than 
our neighbor, but not intrinsically so. 
Every man possesses some good. Some 
more than others. Evil in its various 
forms confronts us. The rum power is- 
everywhere dominant." He spoke of so- 



76 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



cialism, anarchism, nihilism, and "What 
is the solution ? The people have forgot- 
ten the laws of God." He spoke of & the 
dangers threatening our Nation. " We 
need men who are statesmen. The 
spirit of statesmanship should begin 
with the child and end in death. We 
need men whose minds are packed with 
reason. If good Christian men were in 
politics the rum traffic would be banished 
from our land in twenty-four months. 
We need men who are not indifferent. 
Money is the abominable evil of our 
Nation. This Nation is sick— morally 
sick. We have a lack of patriotism. Not 
only stocks and bonds have fallen below 
par, but patriotism as well. We need men 
who have the interests of the people at 
heart. We need men who stand firm for 
the Stars and Stripes. Give us statesmen 
who are good Christian men." 

The oration was eloquent and fall of 
patriotic sentiment. The music rendered 
between each production was furnished by 
the Ameno Quintet Company, of Harris- 
burg, Pa., in a skillful and artistic man- 
ner, and the audience manifested its 
appreciation by vigorously applauding 
each number. The anniversary was a 
grand success, and added another vear's 
history to the glory of Philokosmianism. 

W. E. H. 



Alumni. 

74, F. S. G. Light has recovered suffi- 
ciently from a sprained ankle to walk 
without the use of a crutch. 

'76, Rev. I. H. Albright, of Dallastown, 
Pa., will preach the annual sermon to the 
class of '94. 

'83, Mrs. Alice Evers Burtner and son 
are visiting her parents at Ha<?erstown 
Md. 

'89, Rev. John L. Keedy, of Water- 
town, N. Y., on his return 'home from a 
visit to his parents in Maryland, stopped 
at the College. 

'90, Rev. J. T. Spangler was a member 
of the recent graduating class of our 
Seminary, and was one of the five mem- 
bers chosen to speak. He is now a pastor 
of the IT. B. Church, Hagerstown. Md. 

'87, Rev. Anselm V. Heister recently 
graduated from the Theological School of 
Franklin and Marshall College, and at a 
special session of Synod of the Reformed 
Church, which met at Annville, he was 
licensed to preach. 



College Directory. 
Faculty. 

E. BENJ. BIERMAN, A. M., Ph. D., 

PRESIDENT, 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 
H. CLAY DEANER, A. M., 
Professor of the Latin Language. 

JOHN E. LEHMAN, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

Rev. JNO. A. McDERMAD, A. M., 
Professor of the Greek Language. 

JOHN A. SHOTT, Ph. B., 
Professor of Natural Science. 

MARY E. SLEICHTER, A. B., 
Professor of English Literature. 

CARRIE M. FLINT, 
Professor of Instrumental Music. 

GERTRUDE ALBERTSON, 
Professor of Harmony and Fine Art. 

HARRY E. TROUT, B. E., 
Tutor. 

Literary Societies. 

GLIONIAN. 
Miss ESTELLA STEHMAN, President. 
Miss IDA BOWMAN, Secretary. 
KALOZETEAN. 
JAMES F. ZUG, President. 
SHERIDAN GARMAN, Secretary. 
PHILOKOSMIAN. 
JNO. R. WALLACE, President. 
W. E. HEILMAN, Secretary. 
Y. M. C. A. 
JOHN H. MAYSILLES, President. 
JAY W. YOE, Secretary. 

Y W. G. A. 
Miss MAGGIE STRICKLER, President. 
Miss ESTELLA STEHMAN, Secretary. 



Philokosmian Literary Society. 

Esse Quam Videri. 



On the evening of the 2?th ult. we were 
delighted to have with us the memhers of 
the Clionion Literary Society. 

A special programme, which all seemed 
to enjoy highly, had been prepared for tlie 
occasion. 

The question as to whether the present 
or the past century was conducive to the 
higher state of manhood and womanhood 
was the subject for debate. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



17 



The merits and demerits of the present 
century in this respect, particularly the 
latter, were presented most forcibly. 

After the exercises were concluded 
Miss Stehman, President of the Ladies' 
Society, spoke as their representative. 
She first expressed their appreciation of 
the evening's exercises, and concluded 
with words of encouragement for Philo's 
in their work. Mr. S. H. Stein, an ex- 
nieniber, and Messrs. Hartman, Hoffman, 
Zeioier, Herr, Carter and Howard Enders, 
were also present on this occasion and 
gave us encouraging addresses. 
° Other visitors during the month were 
the following: Messrs. Myers, Hoy, 
Trout, and Leslie Enders. 

We are also happy to state that the 
names of Messrs. Von Neida and Hoy 
have been added to our list of members 
during the past month. 

Our anniversary exercises, an account 
of which appears in another column, were 
a decided success. 

All things considered, we feel encour- 
aged with the results of our work, for we 
realize that success has crowned our 
efforts. 



Personals and Locals. 

The Clionian Literary Society have re- 
cently placed a finely carved oak bulletin 
board on the wall beside the chapel door. 
It is, indeed, " a thing of beauty," and we 
trust that it shall be " a joy forever." 

S. P. Huber, '94, will represent the Pro- 
hibition Club at the State Oratorical Con- 
test to be held at Williamsport, Pa., 
June 5th. 

J- H. Maysilles, '95, attended the Col- 
lege Y. M. C. A. Presidents' Conference, 
held at State College, Pa., April 19th to 
*2d. He reports an excellent conference, 
the results of which have since been felt 
m our meetings. 

The Seniors are busy preparing for 
Commencement and Class Day exercises. 

The Y. M. C. A. has issued a hand- 
book for students, containing many useful 
! acts relating to the Y. M. C. A., Y. W. 
u A. and the College. We are glad to 
°te the progressive spirit of the associa 
ion. The hand-books will be given one 
each student. Others desiring them 
^ have them for five cents each. 

number of general agents have been 
0nnd and enrolled some of the boys for 
su *mer work. 



" Judge" is among the latest additions 
to the reading room and seems to be 
popular. 

The Executive Committee of the Col- 
lege is to be commended for having the 
campus greatly improved by the removal 
of some trees and the addition of a new 
fence. May we not hope for greater im- 
provement before Commencement. 

Mrs. Deaner spent nearly all of this 
month in Maryland visiting the professor's 
parents. 

The supper for the benefit of the base- 
ball club was quite a success. The fish- 
ing pond and the correspondence depart- 
ment were most enjoyable innovations. 

The class in surveying have made a 
draft of our street railroad as a part of 
class work. 

A number of the students have hand- 
some collections of stamps. 

Robbers entered the home of Prof. 
Lehman during the early part of the 
month and stole his watch and purse. 
Next morning the empty purse was found 
on the porch. The ingress was made 
through a window. 

Ex-President Kephart delivered the ad- 
dress to the graduating class of Lebanon, 
Pa., high school. 

Mr. Frank Gibbs, of Mt. Pleasant, Pa., 
visited the College on the 23rcl inst. He 
was a student in 1886. 



Exchange Notes. 

The character of the Stetson Collegiate 
places it in the front rank among our ex- 
changes. 

The Chauncy Hall Abstract presents a 
very neat appearance. 

The Normal College Echo contains a 
fine variety of original poetry. 

After a mysterious absence of several 
months, The Philadetyhian again enlivens 
our exchange table. 

The Wedge, although in its infancy, is 
one of our brightest exchanges. 

The exchange column of the Oak, Lily 
and Ivy, Millford, Mass., is very well 
edited. 

The pages of the Bucknell Mirror are 
always filled with new and interesting 
material. 

The Carthage, Mo., Star says that the 
College Forum eclipses some other lum- 
inaries because it is before 'em. 



-78 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Two thousand molecules can sit com- 
fortably on the point of a pin. Herein 
the molecule differs from man. — Exchange. 

The Vermont Academy Life has made 
its first visit. We wish it much success, 
which it certainlj- merits. 

The dedication number of the High 
School Times reflects much credit upon 
the editors of this excellent school journal. 

We have been asked by several ex- 
changes for our list, but as yet have been 
unable to either copy or publish it. We 
may do so at some future date. 

If the initial numbers of The Senecan 
and Reflector are to be a forecast of the 
future, these papers may be assured of 
abundant success. 

" Who were the first tennis players men- 
tioned in the Bible ?" 

" Joseph served in Pharaoh's court and 
Moses returned out of Egypt." — Ex- 
change. 

Teacher — Why didn't Columbus be- 
come more famous while he was living? 

Pupil — Because he didn't advertise. — 
Ex. (Business men, advertise in The 
Forum.) 

The difficulties in the way of getting an 
education are no greater than the obstacles 
to success which occur in life through 
your not having any. — Exchange. 

The editors of the Midland deserve 
special praise for the handsome souvenir 
number of their paper. In point of style 
and variety of contents it can scarcely' be 
excelled. 

Read to form your opinion and not to 
get some one else's. Be open to persua- 
sion, but do not trust blindly; do not 
accept the opinion of any one because his 
or her name is labeled "Great." — Ex. 

We extend a most cordial welcome to 
the following new exchanges received 
during the past month : The Dial, La- 
crosse, Wis. ; Educational Growth, Pacific 
Wave, The Lndex, High School Quill, 
School Record, Cascadillian, The Mer- 
cury, Mascot, Oyalca, Academic Observer, 
Normal College Echo, Vermont Academy 
Life, College Review, High School 
Herald, Senecan, Reflector, Acta Diurna 
and The Villanova Monthly. 

It might be of interest to some of our 
exchanges to know that we have a 
monthly circulation of one thousand 
copies. Our exchange list numbers about 
four hundred, of which number we receive 



but two hundred regularly. These rep re 
sent thirty-seven States of the Union and' 
four foreign countries. We would say 
that as our exchange list increases we w| 
drop those exchanges which do not com e 
to us with a reasonable degree of reo- u . 
larit}*. e ' 

"When may I sleep again ?" lie cried, 
As the baby began to squall ; 
And a saucy echo answered back, 
" After the (bawl)."— Exchange. 

No man who does not feel absolutely 
compelled to do so by some threatened 
failure of his resources ought to suffer 
himself to double up his work in school 
or take more than the assigned work in 
any term. The man who has sufficient 
time to thoroughly digest his work, sand- 
wiching it meanwhile with a reasonable 
amount of general literary and current 
reading, is a thousand times more bene- 
fited in mental development by his course 
than his neighbor whose entire time each 
day is taken with cramming hasty lessons 
into himself. 

" Whatsoever a man soweth that shall 
he also reap." Sow a thought and reap 
a desire; sow a desire and reap an act; 
sow an act and reap a habit ; sow a habit 
and reap a life; sow a life and reap an 
eternity. The reaping must be the same 
in kind and manifold in degree. Guard 
the thought and the thought will guard 
the desire, and so on through the fist.— 
Exchange. 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 

OPPO. COOK COUNTY HOSPITAL. CHICAGO, ILL. 

ion- ri V 2 n , te J Term begins September 1894, and ends April. 
isjo. lotnl fees §105 each Winter Term, and a laboratory 
deposit which is returnable. Four annual graded court* 
with advanced standing for graduates in Pharmacy and Uni- 
versity preparatory courses prior to the study of Medicine. 
Clinical and laboratory facilities unsurpassed 
J? or annual circular of information, apply to 

W. E. QUINE, M D., 

Pres. of the Faculty, 
813 WEST HARRISON ST 






■! 



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Philadelphia 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



79 



c 



UMBKULAXD VALLEY RAILROAD. 
TIMETABLE— Oct. 1, 1S93 

DOWN TBAINS 



C'bg I Ky'e | Mr'g Day 
Acc. | Exp i Mail Exp 



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» Martinsburg I 

> Hagerstown 

" Greencastle 

" Cbambersburg 6 10 

« Shippensburg 6 32 

» Newville ! 6 53 

" Carlisle I " 18 

" Mecbanicsburg ! / 42 

Ar. DiHsburg 

" Harrisburg 



Philadelphia., 

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11 25 
2 03 
11 15 



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7 00 

7 40 

8 09 
8 30 

8 55 

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A. M. p. M. 



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11 25 

11 48 

12 08 
12 30 
12 50 

1 15 
1 40 



10 25 

1 25 
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P. M. 1 P. M. 



1 25 
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2 00 

6 50 
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5 51 

6 17 
6 43 



7 05 

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Additional trains will leave Carlisle daily except Sunday at 
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stations, arriving at Harrisburg at 6:40 a. m., 8:03 a. m., 4:30 

P ' Evening Mail runs daily between Harrisburg and Cham 



Up Trains. 


Win 
Acc. 


Me's 
Exp 


Hag 
Acc. 


Ev'g 
Mail 


C'bg 
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Exp- 




No. 1 


No. 3 No. 5 


No. 7 


No.17 


No. 9 





P. M. 


A. 


M. 


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p. 


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4 40 




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3 40 


5 


20 


800 




















" Mecbanicsburg,. 


5 03 


8 


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i 03 


4 01 


5 


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8 


36 


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4 25 


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86 


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6 15 


9 


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213 


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" Chambersburg 


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2 35 


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7 


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7 02 


ii 


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1100 

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p. 


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Additional trains wib leave Harrisburg daily except Sunday 
at 10:35 a. m.. 10:45 p. m., arriving at Carlisle at 11:20 a. m., 
11:30 p. m., stopping at all intermediate stations ; additional 
tram will leave Hagerstown at 8:00 a. m., arriving at 11:00 
a. m„ stopping at all intermediate stations. 

Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars between Hagerstown and New 
i ork on Keystone Express and Night Express east, and on 
SS? Ex P ress an <I New Orleans Express west. 
Pullman Sleeping Cars on Night Express and New Orleans 
f^Piessbetween Philadelphia and New Orleans. 

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David brandt, 
B 00T • AND • SHOEMAKER, 

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^STUDENTS' WORK A SPECIALTY. 



^ THE Sfc- 



Eastern Book Store, 

315 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
BOOKS AJSJD STATIONERY. 

Special Hates to Students. 

Second-Hand School Books a Specialty. 

WRITE FOR PRICES. 

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ANNVILLE, PA. 

WS. SEABOLD, 
, DEALER IN 

Drugs, Medicines, Perfumery and Toilet Articles, 



No. 2 East Main St., Annville, Pa. 




CAN I OBTAIN A PATENT? For a 

Srompt answer and an honest opinion, write to 
IUNN «fc CO., who have had nearly fifty years* 
experience in the patent business. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. A Handbook of In« 
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Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special noticeinthe Scientific American, and 
thus are brought widely before the public with- 
out cost to the inventor. This splendid paper, 
issued weekly, elegantly illustrated, has by far the 
largest circulation of any scientific work in the 
world. $3 a vear. Sample copies sent free. 

Buildinti Edition, monthly, $2.50 a year. Single 
copies, '£H cents. Every number contains beau- 
tiful plates, in colors, and photographs of new 
houses, with plans, enabling builders to show the 
latest designs and secure contracts. Address 
MUNN & CO., NEW YOKK. 301 BuoADWAT. 



80 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



"yyiLLIAM KIEBLER, 

SUA VING AND HAIR DRESSING, 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop, Annville, Pa. 

ADAM B. HESS, 
OFFICE AT THE HOTEL EAGLE 
OMNIBUS TO ALL TRAINS. 

ANNVILLE. PA. 



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ACOB SARGENT, 
FASHIONABLE TAILOR, 

18 and 20 Main St., Annville, Pa. 



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\RY GOODS, NOTIONS, GRO- 
CERIES, BOOTS and SHOES, 

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ANNVILLE, PA 

SNOW FLAKE PRINTING HOUSE, 
A. C. M. HEISTER, Prop., 
FINE JOB PRINTING, 

35 S. White Oak Street - - Annville, Pa. 

WILLIAM WALTZ, 
FASHIONABLE 
HAIR CUTTING AND SHAVING SALOON, 

West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
H. H. KKEIDER. JNO. E. HE BR. 

KREIDER & CO., 
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

Hard & Soft Coal, Grain, Seeds Salt & Feed. 

Office : Railroad Street, near Depot, 
Telephone Connection. ANNVILLE, PA. 

THE BEST STOCK, THE LOWEST 
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ANNVILLE, PA. 



FURNITURE, JOS 



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DEALER IN 

Gold Watches and Jewelry, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYS. 
TEKS AND CKEAM. AN]Vi yiLLE, PA. 

S. M. SHENK'S BAKERY, 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

FRESH BREAD, CAKES AND ROLLS, 

One Door West Penn'a House, Annville. 
S- 33. X^T-A.CS-3>a-33H., 

— Headquarters t or-^- — 

GROCERIES, CONFECTIONERIES 

OYSTERS, FRUITS AND NUTS. 

Restaurant Attached. Meals at All Hours. 

12 West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



II yon want to Buy a Hat rignt, and a mat Hat, or anytiiiiig in 
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GO TO 

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Eighth and Cumberland Sfs., Lebanon, Pa, 

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and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home-made, 
Ingrain and Brussels Carpets. You buy Cheaper 
from us than away from home, and have a large 
stock to select from. 

THE 

U.B. MUTUAL AID SOCIETY 

OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

HOME OFFICE, LEBANON, PENNA. 

Chartered by the State Legislature, March 11, 1869. 
Positive amounts guaranteed and claims paid in 
full. 1 
Benefits of $1000 insurance secured for $8.00. 
Reciprocal Circle Insurance,new and very popular. 

Invested Assets $146,809.94 

Contingent Assets 116,970.00 

Assessment Basis 5,2'J5,OOO.00 

Death Losses Paid 6,774,123.01 

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Reliable Agents Wanted Everywhere. 



F. W. FROST, 
BOOK BINDER AND BLANK BOOK 
MANUFACTURER, 

783 Cumberland St., - - Lebanon, P* 



Volume VII. 



Number 6. 



THE 



College Forum. 



JUNE, 1894. 



• *• CONTENTS: + • 



PAGB 

Harmony of Revelation and Science, ! 81-85 

Exchange Notes, 85 

Editorials, 86 

Commencement Week, 86-88 

Commencement Day, 88-91 

Board of Trustees, 91-93 



PAGE 

The Reception, 93 

Kalozetean Literary Society, 93, 94 

Philokosmian Literary Society, 94 

Among the Exchanges, 94 

Advertisements, 94-96 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



HARRY LIGHT, 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 



22 EAST MAIN ST., ANNVILLE, PA. 



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4 



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Please Mention "The College Forum." 



THE COLLEGE FOEUM. 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Yol. VII. No. 6. ANNVILLE, PA., JUNE, 1894. Whole No. 72. 



The Harmony of Revelation and 
Science. 



REV. J. O. JOHNSTON, ^76, Ph. D. 

The topic we are now to consider is one 
that has of late claimed much attention 
and awakened considerable discussion. 
And in addressing ourselves to it to-daj-, 
it will be well to bear in mind a statement 
made recently by an eminent scientist 
(Dr. J. W. Dawson, McGill College, Mon- 
treal): " That science teaches the method 
of nature and not its laws ; the Bible its 
cause and not its method. And because 
of this we find that revelation stands 
where it always was, while science in its 
theories of method is continually chang- 
ing ground. So if we attempt to com- 
pare them with each other our com- 
parison must be with revelation as in it- 
self fixed, and with science as it is at the 
point of progress it may happen to have 
reached at this time. Another thing we 
we should bear in mind is that the con- 
flict between religion and science, and the 
conflict between the Bible and science, are 
not equivalent expressions. The candid 
student will remember that religion and 
science have met in conflict, and science 
nas gained a victory, for she has been the 
advocate of truth, while religion was the 
advocate of error. 

But between the Bible and science we 
ma y deny that a conflict ever existed. 
-Inat which has been supposed to be a 
conflict, as Br. Howard Crosby says, when 
reduced to its lowest terms is simply an 
attack by a few scientific men upon the 

1D je. These scientific men assault the 
Scriptures, but the Scriptures make no 
punter-attack on science. The Bible is 

n the side of science, and if scientific 

en attack it it must be from some other 
^°tive than the love of science. But 
«ote this fact that the very first scientific 

mds, renowned in the annals of science 



for their discoveries, have been lovers of 
the Bible. Sound, more than merit, at- 
tracts attention, and one would think by 
the blast being made in the world just now 
that all scientific men must necessarily be 
arrayed against the Bible. The young 
and inexperienced are overcome by the 
clamor, not having yet learned that an 
empty barrel makes more noise than a full 
one. Newton was only one of hundreds 
in his clay, who, given to science, loved 
and revered his Bible. From Newton's 
day to this the succession has been com- 
plete, not in an attenuated line, but in a 
broad stream of faithful Bible men ; and 
the science that boasts in our time of its 
Faraday, its Forbes, its Carpenter, its 
Hitchcock, its Dana and its Torrey, and 
Drummond, certainly cannot be consid- 
ered as occupying a position hostile to the 
Bible. If the Bible is opposed to science, 
how strange that these acute men, who 
knew (or have known) the Bible so well 
from constant study, should never per- 
ceive it, while it is reserved to others who 
do not know it at all to make the import- 
ant discovery. To enlarge on this point 
would be simply to quote the names of 
men distinguished in every department oj 
scientific discovery who have been no oc- 
casional exceptions showing some per- 
sonal eccentricit}-, which could account 
for this reverence for the Bible, but in the 
use of their natural reason, and never sus- 
pected b}^ their fellows of any inconsis- 
tency in upholding with equal hands the 
claims of science and the truth of the 
Scriptures. 

They were men who had felt the power 
of the Scriptures in the inner life of the 
heart, had received the impress of their 
truth in a region where faith is assurance, 
had seen the God of truth in the gloiy of 
his oracles, and were ready to say, with 
the late President of Amherst College, 
himself a scientific man of no mean rank, 
" If the supposed results of scientific dis- 



82 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



covery should be found to be antagonistic 
to the Bible, I should cleave to the Bible 
and suspect the results." This deep, in- 
ward experimental knowledge hindered 
not their course of explanation in the 
realm of eternal nature, but rather gave it 
a divine sanction and zeal. To such men 
the apriori argument (which to others 
would of course be of no value) would 
have full weight, that the God of truth 
could not err in His teachings regarding 
nature, while conveying to man the more 
important teachings concerning grace. If 
God declared a way of salvation and a 
cosmogon}-, the cosmogony would be as 
true as the way of salvation, however, the 
two might differ in their relative impor- 
tance to the individual man and his des- 
tiny. If there is an error in the cos- 
mogony, the way of salvation may be 
rightfully discredited, whether willfulness 
or ignorance be the case of error. A man 
might be imagined as making a mistake 
in his physics, and yet being true in his 
moral philosophy, but a God never. If 
He err anywhere He is no God. This 
course of argument is of weight with those 
who have proved the Bible by its divine 
heart-touch. Others like Dr. Briggs and 
Prof. Webster would deny that God had 
anj^thing to do with the cosmogony of 
the Bible, but the Bible heart takes the 
Bible testimon}^ concerning Moses and all 
who wrote the books of the Old Testa- 
ment, that holy men of God spoke as they 
were moved by the Holy Ghost. Where 
no didactic statement is made they can 
expect to see phenomenal language used 
by God and by His inspired prophets, the 
language which all understand and which 
scientific men themselves use in their 
ordinary speech, in using which they 
render themselves liable to no suspicion 
of ignorance, since no one founds an argu- 
ment thereon against the user's scientific 
character. But when the inspired writer 
teaches a cosmogony or asserts a historic 
fact involving scientific elements, when 
the phenomenal language would be false- 
hood, the Bible men of science accept the 
statement as the truth of God. Even in 
these cases phenomenal language may be 
used for the filling up (as in a scientific 
treatise prepared for the popular under- 
standing), but the main framework of the 
teaching must be strictly exact. No man 
would accuse a Leverrier of scientific 
ignorance who should use in his almanac 
the phrases " the sun rises " and " the sun 



sets," or who should say " when the su ft 
reaches its most northerly point," al- 
though scientifically viewed these expres- 
sions are absurd. Just as absurd is it to 
accuse the Bible of scientific ignorance 
because it states that the sun and the 
moon stand still, or in its ordinary 
dialogue, poetry or history, uses the 
popular and unscientific language of the 
day. 

Indeed the Bible may itself be consid- 
ered as a scientific book in its express al- 
lusion, bold statement as to facts of 
science which have only lately become 
known to scientific men. I quote Dr. 
Crosb}-. A careful examination of the 
H0I3 7 Scriptures will convince aii} T candid 
searcher that the God of Nature is speak- 
in the words of grace that He who made 
each atom of matter and each joint in 
causation, is the direct inspirer of phrase- 
ology that has no support in the general 
knowledge of the day, nor in the special i 
knowledge of philosophers, but that has 
been confirmed by the discoveries made | 
thousands of years afterwards by the in- 
vestigations of nature and her laws. Take 
a few instances. 

In the book of Ecclesiastes we have the 
return of water hy evaporation from the 
sea to the springs expressly stated : "All 
the rivers run into the sea yet the sea is 
not full : unto the place whence the rivers 
came, thither they return again." No- 
human being in that age was qualified to 
tell the writer of Ecclesiastes that scien- 
tific fact. How did the writer hit on such 
a record ? Was it a happy accident or 
did the God of Nature guide his thoughts 
and pen ? 

In the 39th Psalm we read, " My sub- 
stance was not hid from thee when I ^ aS 
made in the lowest parts of the earth. 
What man in David's day would ha ye 
dared trace the elements of our body 
beyond the parental source ? Who then 
on earth had so studied the chemistry 
of life as to find in the upturned 
strata of the earth, the rocks and coals 
upheaved from their original beds, the 
molecular fountains of the human body- 
It was for science but lately to show to 
the world how all the elements of nature 
flow in and out of organisms, and so ho^ 
every atom now existing in my body ^ 
once have been in plants and earths an« 
rocks and sea and from these have bee» 
carried into the stream of organization- 
And yet here in the grand old psalm 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



83 



David, written three thousand years ago, 
this great truth of science is expressly 
uttered and the parts of our bodies shown, 
when they were in the soil and its con- 
tents before they took their position in 
human generation and when God in our 
organic nature was guiding them all 
through their intricate paths to their des- 
tination. 

In the Epistle of 2d Peter we have the 
uprising of continents from below the sur- 
face of the sea told us in the clearest 
words, a great truth which is supposed 
bv many to have appeared but now among 
men and that as the result of scientific 
researches. When we hear modern sci- 
ence gloomingl}- describe the old liquid 
aequor, and then the Andes rising grad- 
ually above it, and then the Alps and the 
Himalayas in their proper order, we are 
charmed with the picture and are ready 
to crown with laurel the learned men who 
have wrought out this primeval history 
of patient investigation and comparison, 
and this is well. All honor to these faith- 
ful and successful students of God's 
grand universe who have used their 
observation and logic as God intended 
them to be used, for the enlargement 
of knowledge, the advancement of man- 
kind and the glory of the Maker. But 
while we gratefully place these laurels 
on their heads, let us not forget to go 
back eighteen centuries and hear a fisher- 
man of Galilee, taught by the God who 
made the earth, use this language not 
understood when he uttered it, perhaps, 
even by himself, but now made clear b}- 
the labors of science : " By the word of 
Grod the heavens were of old and the 
earth standing out of the water and 
through the water ;" literally " the earth 
put of the water and through the water 
m the process of getting its consistency." 
(II. Peter III.:5.) {oriyeorwoa. compacted.) 

Because the phrase "foundations of the 
earth " is frequently used in the Scrip- 
tures it is loosely charged upon the Bible 
that it recognizes the old fanciful idea of 
a stable, immovable earth, solidly founded 
ou indefinitely deep foundations, in di- 
le ct antagonism to the fact of its being 
upheld in space. But this charge utterly 
tails when we see that the Bible expressly 
d eclares of the Maker of all, "He hangeth 
y?e earth upon nothing." (Job XXVI. 

h which is the exact translation of 
tQe Hebrew: " Toleh eretz al f'limah." 
60 that the Bible phraseology of the earth's 



foundations is just what would be used in 
any poetry, though the poet were the most 
scientific astronomer. In this statement 
of Job we have another of the numerous 
evidences of a scientific knowledge, find- 
ing utterance in Holy Writ, which was so 
far beyond the knowledge of the day that 
it could onhy come from Him who was the 
Author of nature. It has been beautifully 
shown us by the late discoveries of science 
that there are asteroidal bodies innumer- 
able pursuing their orbits around our sun, 
through whose path the earth at times 
passes, when some of these bodies come 
within the influence of the earth's attract- 
ion and are broken b}- contact with the 
earth's atmosphere, and are then precipi- 
tated to the earth's surface in stones of 
larger or smaller size. They are really 
stars visiting our earth. But the Bible 
recorded this fact more than thirty cen- 
turies ago. When Deborah, the proph- 
etess of God, sang her magnificent pean 
of victory over the vast hosts of Jabin 
and his general Sisera, she singles out one 
feature of the divine interference in rout- 
ing the foe, akin to that which sent the 
hailstones upon the sleeping army of 
Southern Canaan in Joshua's day. She 
sings in her gratitude to God. " The stars 
in their courses fought against Sisera." 
Why attribute to a sill}' astrological super- 
stition what is perfectly explicable on sci- 
stientific grounds ? God made the aerolites 
( meteoric stones ) to serve his own pur- 
pose, and He who directs all the conjunc- 
tions of nature used the asteroidal phe- 
nomena to which we have referred in His 
guardianship of His own people. It has 
been common to saj- that Scripture makes 
a mistake in speaking of the ant as stor- 
ing up its food, that in realitj* it only 
stores up its eggs. But Col. Sykes dis- 
covered at Poonah a species of ants (atta 
j)rovidens ) which regularly stores up the 
seeds of millet for its food in stormy 
weather. The objectors did not know 
enough when they corrected the science of 
Scripture. They have been equally pre- 
mature when they have objected to the 
scientific statement regarding the ostrich 
abandoning its eggs, for late researches 
have proved that the ostrich quits her 
eggs during the da}- and abandons them 
altogether if there has been any intrusion 
upon them, thus furnishing an admirable 
type of carelessness regarding offspring. 

But these instances of the scientific ac- 
curacy of the Bible might be indefinitely 



84 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



multiplied, yet I shall content myself with 
the mention of but one further example. 
It is a favorite theoiy that the egg was 
before the animal and the seed before the 
plant, but this is not a trul} r scientific view 
of the matter. We plant an acorn, and 
its tree then grows up from this seed, the 
branching oak with its might}'- limbs and 
rich f oliage. But whence came those limbs 
and that foliage ? From the seed ? Cer- 
tainly not. The oak was never in the 
acorn. There was a vital principle in the 
acorn, b}* whose action, under certain re- 
quisite conditions, the materials from sur- 
rounding nature were drawn to it, united 
and assimulated so as to make the oak. The 
oak we know was never in the acorn. Could 
that great bulk have been in the little 
seed ? When that acorn was planted the fu- 
ture oak was lying all around in the other 
vegetable matter of the earth. Now then 
if the analogy of growth, as we see it, re- 
quires not only the seed, but a surrounding 
field of material for the seed to use, how 
could an original seed have effected an}*- 
thing when there was no surrounding veg- 
etation ? The oak must have been before 
the seed, the animal before the egg. If we 
are going back to originals it is in this 
way we must solve the problem. 

And now what does the first chapter of 
Genesis say ? " And the earth brought 
forth the herb yielding seed (not the seed 
yielding herb) and the tree whose seed is 
in itself" (not the seed whose tree is in 
itself). What mere human mind would 
have thought of putting it in this way? 
And yet this is the only way in which a 
true science can settle the question be- 
tween the seed and the tree. 

Another fact regarding the scientific 
character of the Bible is that it supplies 
the links in the scientific chain which our 
experimental science would even fail to 
reach. 

The analysis of matter is traced to a 
very wonderful degree of minuteness 
through the use of the microscope, spec- 
trum and chemical appliances ; also the 
connection of some of the lower phenom- 
ena of causation through which old arts 
are enriched and new arts created from 
the wide and yet limited field of human 
research and discovery. Experimental 
science always finds itself at last on the 
border of the great unknown. 

Conjecture may go further, but science 
has nothing to do with conjecture, for 
atomic theories and evolution theories, 



that have thrown up such a dust of late 
have all their standing in the realm of 
conjecture, where true science never pre- 
sumes to tread. The}* are as utterly for. 
eign to science as the South Sea bubble 
was to legitimate business. It is one of 
the strange facts of the day that theories 
which are as phantom-like as those of the 
vortices or Symene's Hole have stalked 
through our civilized world these few 
years past, gaining credence and homage 
among the crowd because of the robes of 
science which some have adroitly thrown 
around their shoulders. The people have 
a profound and righteous regard for 
science, and are very ready to receive all 
that bears her honored indorsement. And 
to such an extent are they loyal that when 
some old and decrepit theories are ad- 
vanced that have not a grain of science in 
them, but belong to another department 
of thought altogether, yet with the name 
of science daubed upon their brows, the 
unsuspicious public 3-ield them an honest 
reverence. Experimental science, as has 
been said, always finds itself at last 011 
the borders of the great unknown. What- 
ever is to be known beyond this border 
cannot be derived from human experi- 
ment, for the workings are in a sphere 
where no human sense has play. And 
conjecture is only a slight veil for dis- 
appointment, and brings no satisfaction 
to the mind. What then? Are we to 
know nothing beyond? Is experimental 
science the all of science? Has she no 
other expounder than human observation? 

Can no one tell what we cannot tell 
ourselves ? Is there no friend in all this 
vast universe to help us out of our ignor- 
ance ? Why cannot some higher intelli- 
gence whisper into our ears the secret that 
lies be}*ond our own sense-perceptive? 

There must be something above US- 
Why does it not give us light ? Now i' 1 
answer to such natural queries stands the 
Bible, the revelation of God. For thou- 
sands of years it has been the brigW 
lamp to the feet of millions of our raeft 
It has carried in its rays the testimony of 
its divine character, enlightening the e}' eS ) 
converting the soul, renewing the lift- 
No such strong evidence for any fact cog- 
nizable to man can be gathered as the 
evidence for the divine authorship of th e 
Bible. 

All modern civilization rests on the 
Bible. All the discoveries and appli^ lceS 
of art and philantrophy for the elevation 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



85 



and well-being of mankind, which makes 
modern civilation so contrasted with the 
pseudo-civilization of Assyria, Babylon 
and Egypt, sprang from the Bible. Wher- 
ever if goes there are established law and 
order, the rights of men and the influence 
of human sympathy. And when it comes 
to the individual heart there spring up 
personal peace and joy, a holy satisfaction 
before God and desires after purity and 
truth, for myriads of witnesses point to 
the Bible and say, " Thence came our new 
life." Now this overwhelming testimony 
cannot be brushed away by a contemptu- 
ous wrap of the arm. A scientific mind 
must regard all facts and admit all honest 
testimony. And it is this Bible, thus evi- 
denced from without and from within, 
that completes our science by revealing 
from a higher intelligence those upper 
links in the chain of causation that human 
experiment never could reach. It con- 
troverts nothing that we have discovered, 
hut it complements our discoveries with a 
a divine revelation. It shows the begin- 
ning of causation in the divine purposes 
of grace, and allows no breach between 
the Creator and His Creation. But such 
splendid imagining as we now quote, it 
conveys to our mind the grand truth of 
God's superintendence of all the move- 
ments of this commingled nature. 

" He holdeth the winds in his fists ; 
He ruleth the raging of the sea ; He 
rideth upon the heavens ; He flieth upon 
the wings of the storm ; He measureth the 
waters in the hollow of His hand, and 
meteth out heaven with a space, and com- 
prehend the dust of the earth in a measure, 
and weigheth the mountains in scales ; 
He drieth up the sea and maketh the rivers 
a wilderness." In this way the Scrip- 
tures refer all the changes which our 
experimental science correctly classifies 
and whose proximate condition it care- 
fully notes to the ever watchful provi- 
dence and the intelligent guidance of the 
Supreme Maker of all. The grandest 
Movements of nature and the smallest 
event of its history are alike decided by 
f^s presence and power. He establishes 

e stars in their paths, and not a sparrow 
tails to the ground without Him. Besides 
Mis governing and guiding presence, the 
^ible reveals another link in the chain of 
JJiaterial causation. It shows back of the 
Power the divine heart of grace. It de- 
^I'es that all things work together for 
§°°d to them that love God. It thus [tuts 



a soul and an emotion in all the varied 
interlacing of material phenomena ; God, 
the Almighty Creator, and His infinite 
love. Nature is no more a fragment. It is 
complete. It is no more a blind fataltty, 
but a designed adaptation in its every part. 
And is not this revealed truth concerning 
nature for more important to us than all 
else which our experimental science can 
elicit ? Does it not satisfy the craving of 
our souls, which cravings were made to 
expect this very revelation ? And is not 
our real triumph over nature gained when 
we can look around on all the grandest 
and most awful features, and say in calm- 
ness, "My Father made them all; His hand 
upholds and guides them all." We con- 
clude with the conviction that the experi- 
mental examination of nature's attractive 
field will always be the best performed by 
the devout mind that recognizes God and 
His revelation in the investigation. The 
mind that is in harmony with the grand 
whole of Creation, from the Creator's 
hand down to the last combination of His 
works, will be guarded against extrava- 
gance in the use of false inductions, and 
will find a principle of symmetry, where else 
were arbitrary law or wanton movement. 
To eliminate God from His Creation, and 
to keep from view the power that 
formed in the action of His formations, is 
to accept a position at war with funda- 
mental reason, which cordially echoes the 
words of scripture, " He that planted the 
ear, shall not He hear? He that formed 
the eye, shall He not see ? Ps. 94 : 9. Then 
has science her fairest aspect, when in the 
light of God's revelation she performs her 
high task as an act of worship to Him, and 
lifts her eye from every new discovery in 
Nature's cunning mechanism, saying, " In 
wisdom Thou hast made them all." 

Exchange Notes. 

The lessons in penmanship in the High 
School Advance are both instructive and 
unique. 

A valuable historical article, " Discov- 
eries before Columbus," appeared in the 
May number of the Mercersburg Monthly. 

The Hard Times number of the Normal 
Advance would be a much more unique 
idea if the Pekin Mirror had not been 
ahead of it. 

The commencement souvenir number of 
the High School Life, Springfield, Mo., is 
very commendable. Better paper would 
have improved the illustrations. 



86 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



EDITORS. 



H. CLAY DEANEK, A. M., 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher. 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 

John H. Maysilles, '95. Ira E. Albert, '97. 

George II. Stein, '97. 



EXCHANGE EDITOR. 

Norman C. Schlichter, 



A LIT MM EDITOR. 

Prop. John E. Lehman, A. M. 



SOCIETY EDITORS. 

Clionian Society— Miss Estella Stehman,.'9(5. 
Philokosmian Society— Oscar E. Good, '94. 
Kalozetean Society— James P. Zuo, '94. 

THE COLLEGE FORUM will be sent monthly for one 
school year on receipt of twenty-five cents. Subscriptions 
received at any time. 

For terms of advertising, address the Publisher. 



Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as 
second-class mail matter. 

j£ tutorial. 

The Forum takes special pleasure in 
calling the reader's attention to the excel- 
lent cut of the Class of '94 in this number. 



The reunion of the Maryland students 
will he held in Keedysville, Md., August 
3d. The following are engaged to speak; 
Miss Anna Wilson, Miss Flora Maysilles, 
Miss Anna Keedy, Mr. John H. Maysilles 
and Rev. J. F. Spangler. 



The fall term will open September 3d. 
An active canvass for students has begun 
with most encouraging results. Any one 
knowing of any young people who should 
go to college will confer a favor by send- 
ing the President word. 



The Commencement Week exercises 
very happily culminated in the royal re- 
ception given b}* the Senior Class to the 
Faculty, students and friends. This is a 
a new feature, and struck a popular chord 
in the hearts of the friends of the College. 
We hope it may be annually observed. 
The attendance was very large. 



Miss Sleiciiter, the preceptress and 
teacher of Modern Languages and Eng- 



lish Literature, and Miss Albertson, 
teacher of Art, tendered their resignations 
to the Board of Trustees. The personnel 
of the Faculty otherwise remains the 
same. Miss Anna M. Thompson, Ph. B., 
a lachy of experience and scholarship, will 
will take the place of Miss Sleichter. 



The father of Miss Fortenbaugh died 
on the 16th inst. A week before Com- 
mencement Miss Fortenbaugh was called 
home ~hy telegram. Shortly after her 
arrival home her father became uncon- 
scious and remained so till he died. Mr. 
Fortenbaugh 's great desire was to come 
to see his daughter graduate. Miss Mel- 
lie has the warmest sympathies of the 
Faculty, students and many friends here 
in her sad loss. 



Commencement Week. 



SUNDAY MORNING. 

Nature seemingly did its utmost to 
make this a most agreeable opening for 
the commencement of 1894. All day long 
a salubrious breeze and a golden sunshine 
lent their charms to the occasion. The 
chapel was most tastily decorated with 
choice potted plants and ferns. The ros- 
trum was occupied by Dr. Funkhouser, 
President Bierman, the College pastor, 
Rev. H. B. Spayd,Ex-President C. J. Kep- 
hart and Rev. J. H. Von Neida. After 
a well rendered anthem by the College 
choir and prayer by Rev. Kephart, the 
Baccalaureate sermon was preached by 
Dr. Funkhouser, of Union Biblical Semi- 
nary. 

He took for his theme " Success in Life, 
basing his remarks on St. John, 3:30, "He 
must increase, but I must decrease." 

The following is a concise synopsis of 
how success may be attained as set forth 
by the Rev. Doctor : 

1. Bv loyalty to the divine plan for our 
life. 

2. By the emphasis of spiritual things 
above temporal ones. 

3. By a recognition of the fact that 
our work here will soon be done. 

4. By giving ourselves up to things of 
eternal significance. 

The sermon was a masterly discourse 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



87 



fln( j W as much appreciated by the large 
audience. 

SUNDAY AFTERNOON. 

At 2 o'clock the graduating exercises 
of the Bible Normal Union occurred. 
The rostrum was occupied by Dr. Funk- 
houser, Prof. Deaner, President Bierman, 
and Rev. Clayton Miller, of Lititz, Pa. 

After prayer by Rev. Miller and a 
charming soio by Miss Pennypacker, Rev. 
Funkhouser delivered the address to the 
graduates. His address was very inter- 
esting and instructive. It harmonized 
very well with the class motto, " More 
Beyond," which, made of ferns, was sus- 
pended in the rear of the rostrum. 

The diplomas were then presented with 
appropriate remarks to the following 
graduates : Chas. B. Wingerd, Ira E. 
Albert, David Buddinger, Jay Yoe, Jas. 
F. Zug and Hariy W. Mayer. 

Each of the graduates wore a bunch of 
ferns, denoting sincerity, upon his coat 
lapel. A good sized audience was in at- 
tendance. 

SUNDAY EVENING. 

A very large audience assembled at 7:30 
to hear the annual sermon by I. H. Al- 
bright, Ph. D., of Dallastown, Pa. The 
theme of the discourse was, " Being good 
and doing Good." It was based on John 
5:11, and Galatians 6:10. The subject 
was handled in an eloquent and forcible 
manner, and was listened to with much 
attention. 

The College choir rendered another of 
their delightful selections at the opening 
■of the service. 

MONDAY EVENING. 

The musical commencement was the 
only event of the day. Long before the 
a Ppointed hour crowds began thronging 
towards the chapel, which was soon filled 
to overflowing. Promptly at 7:30 Presi- 
dent Bierman, Rev. Mr. Fout, of Wash- 
ington, D. C, Miss Flint, Miss Albertson, 
tbe graduates and other performers took 
their position upon the tastefully adorned 
rostrum. 

The following program was rendered 
entire, with the exception of the piano 
olo by Miss Fortenbaugh, who was un- 
avoidably absent on account of the seri- 
0118 illness of her father: 

Ova PART I. 

RTt,RE -" Midsummer Night's Dream," 
ilia, (Mendels-olm), Schmidt. 

es ^oose, Saylor, Pennypacker and Stehman. 



Invocation, Rev. Mr. Font. 

Piano Solo—" Bridal Procession March," Grieg. 

Miss Pennypacker. 
Vocal Solo— "Song of the whippoorwill," White. 

Miss Stehman. 
Piano Solo— " 6 Deutsche Marchenbilder," Bendel. 
Miss Saylor. 

Vocal Solo—" Fleeting Days," Bailey. 
Miss Wilson. 

PART II. 

Piano Duet—" Beauties of Belisario," 

(Two Pianos.) Arr. by A. Coria. 
Misses Bowman and Fortenbaugh. 
Piano Solo—" La Danse des fees," Jaell. 

Miss Bowman. 
Vocal Solo—" Through the Valley," Gilder. 

Miss Pennypacker. 
Piano Solo— "Rondo Capriccioso," Mendelssohn. 

Miss Fortenbaugh. 
Piano Solo— " Ballad in ab," Chopin. 
Miss Loose. 

Presentation of Diplomas. By Pres. Bierman. 
Chorus— " Come with the Gipsy Bride," 

From Bohemian Girl. 

All the numbers were executed with ex- 
quisite skill. The audience showed its ap- 
preciation by prolonged applause after each 
number. The five graduates were Misses 
Ida L. Bowman, of Royersford ; Mellie 
Fortenbaugh, of York; Emily Loose, of 
Palmyra; Ella Pennypacker, of Mount- 
ville, and Mabel Saylor, of Annville. 

TUESDAY EVENING. 

The public exercises of the Alumni As- 
sociation were held at 7:30 before a large 
audience. The exercises were very inter- 
esting throughout, and enjoyed by all 
present. The solo by Mrs. Light was de- 
lightfully rendered. The following unique 
program was rendered : 

Piano Solo—" Feuilles de Ros p s," Sydney Smith. 

Miss Anna E. Brightbill, '9:2. 
Invocation— Rev. J no. R. Wright. 

Vocal Solo— "A Dream of Spring," Max Spicher. 

Miss Anna R. Forney, '92. 
Greeting—" By the President." 

Miss Jcsie Kreider, '92. 
Vocal Duet—" The Gypsies." Brahms. 
Misses Pennypacker, '94, and Anna R. Forney, '92. 
Essay—" Pandora's Bequest." 

Miss Mary M. Shenk, B. S., '91. 
Piano Solo—" Hortensia." Gustav Lange. 

Miss Ida L. Bowman, '94 
An Original Poem— "Mathematics and Love," 

Prof. John E. Lehman, A. M., '74. [Illustrated.] 
Vocal Solo— "Selected." Mrs. Ella Smith Light, '81. 
Oration — " Harmony of Science and the Bible." 

Rev. J. G. Johnston, Ph. D., '76. 
Vocal Solo—" Promised." Benjamin. 
[Reply to DeKoben's "O, Promise Me."] 
C. J. Barr, '82. 
ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
L. V. C SONG. 

Side by side we've trodden our paths, 
But now they will soon diverge, 
And beckon to more distant walks 
Where life's activities urge. 
Let us face the issue bravely, 
With a purpose just and true ; 
For 11 Nisi Dominus Frustra" 
Will give us passport through. 

So now we come to say farewell 
To kind friends assembled here ; 
And trust that peace and happiness 
May pilot you ev'ry year. 
And if, when next we call the roll, 



m 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



An absent one there may be ; 
We'll strive to pass life's final goal 
To meet in eternity. 

Immediately after adjournment the 
Alumni guests repaired to the Ladies' 
Hall, where the annual banquet was 
served by caterer Shaud. 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON. 

At 2:00 o'clock " Class Day " exercises 
were held in the chapel. In the rear of 
the rostrum a large white canvas was 
suspended. Upon this was painted in 
black letters the class motto, " Nisi Domi- 
nus frustra." A large audience greeted 
the performers, and listened attentively 
to the following program : 
Instrumental Quartette. 

Misses Bowman, Pennypacker, Loose and Saylor. 
Address by the President. <J. K. Hartuian. 

History of the Class. J. F. Zug. 

Duet. Misses Bowman and Fortenbaugh. 

Illustrated Lecture. D. S. Eshleman. 

CHORUS BY THE CLASS. 
Prophecy. Ida Bowman. 

Presentation of Diplomas. W. H. Kreider. 

Ouartkttf Misses Pennypacker and Fortenbaugh. 
quartette. Messrs Eshleman and Good. 
Presentation of Pipe to Juniors. O. E. Good. 
Response. j. h. Maysilles. 

CLASS SONG. 

Words by G. K. Hartman. 
Music by Anna E. Wilson. 

Classmates, let us pause a moment, 
Ere we answer duty's calls, 
To think of many happy hours 
Spent within these classic halls. 
We've had many ardent struggles, 
Pouring over needed lore, 
To secure a firm foundation 
For the Class of Ninety-four. 

LECTURE. 

The annual lecture before the literary 
societies was delivered by Hon. "Willis 
Bland, Judge of the Courts of Berks 
county. 

Commencement Day. 

Annville on Thursday morning was the 
scene of animation and activitv^. The in- 
coming trains brought large numbers of 
friends and strangers to town whose objec- 
tive point was the College chapel, where the 
25th annual commencement exercises were 
to be held. The chapel was filled to its ut- 
most capacity and standing room was at 
a premium. At 9:15 o'clock President 
Bierman, faculty and the class entered 
amid applause. The President in a few 
words welcomed the audience to the Com- 
mencement exercises. The rostrum was 
most tastily decorated with potted palms, 
ferns and plants. 



The orations, extracts of which follow 
were interspersed with music by the Per! 
severance Orchestra of Lebanon. 

THE ORATIONS. 

" Conditioned Suffrage," by H. Lenich 
Meyer, of Annville, Pa. "Tradition, 
superstition and ignorance warp our 
social forces. To safely set up a social 
experiment is impossible. Popular dis- 
cussions of social questions are disorderly. 
Most men assume statesmen can, if they 
will, place a people in the way of ma- 
terial prosperity. Labor must t>e organ- 
ized according to the conditions laid clown 
by nature. From this germ the develop- 
ment of society goes on by regular steps 
of advancement. Liberty perishes in all 
socialistic schemes. The whole history 
of man has been a serious of toilsome, 
painful and bloody struggles. Political 
economy has been tosed overboard when- 
ever it became troublesome. Good gov- 
ernment embraces liberty, order, security, 
justice, and equality before the law. There 
are no absolute dogmas in pure politics. 
The aim is the welfare of the common- 
wealth. There is no hope of progress in 
politics save by growth. The only place 
men are equal is in the grave and not in the 
cradle. The demand for social equality 
overthrew the older forms of class govern- 
ment. Patronage is dispensed to the re- 
cipients to flatter their vanit} r . The voter 
never thinks beyond the preceding issue. A 
restraint must be placed on the ruler unci 
ruled. Shut off the ignorant voter and 
let intelligent men hold the rights of gov- 
ernment. The voter must be the umpire 
to judge between the experienced states- 
men and the accomplished demagogue^ 
Man being a morally fallen creature and 
liberty depending on morality, the book 
lessons of the State schools must be im- 
bued, justice, benevolence and virtue. 

" Friendship of Woman," by Miss Anna 
Wilson, of Beaver Creek, Md. " It has 
been said that woman has no friendship, 
and a Latin Maxim says : 'A woman either 
loves or hates; there is no medium.' At 
will be found on examination that woman 
is by nature less selfish and more sympa- 
thetic than man. She has a greater need 
of sympathy than man, and it follows that 
in the absence of love she seeks friendship 
instead. It can be truthfully said that 
'Woman is much more apt to think that 
the form in the mirror is lovely, but not 
to think it of herself Friendship pk v * 
a great part in enriching the lives of* P er ' 



THE COLLEGE IOBUM. 



sous. Many a life is darkend b}^ insincer- 
ity and treachery. The friendship which 
is most rich and intense is that which cov- 
ers the experience of school girls ; they 
form the largest class of those human at- 
tachments whose sympathetic interfusions 
glorify the world and sweeten existence. 
The friendship of girls is more ardent than 
that of the opposite sex. After knowing 
the importance of friendship, the pleasure 
and joy it may }*ield, one should be taught 
to think more of it and cultivate it with 
great care. It it is eminenty fitting that 
this heaven-born principle should be cul- 
tivated and cherished by woman, for to 
her it is given to soften earth's rougher, 
sterner environments ; to refine and en- 
noble its fiercer and darker passions, and 
to glorify and exalt the purest and grand- 
est condition in the world." 

"Confucius and His Religion," by 
David S. Eshleman, of Berlin, Ont., Can- 
ada. "Every age has had its great au- 
thors and reformers. The lives and works 
of some of these were soon forgotten, 
while those of others have left their im- 
press upon the world for ages and are 
still regarded with reverence and admira- 
tion. Confucius, the founder of the Chi- 
nese religion, is of the latter class." 
The speaker gave an account of the life 
and work of Confucius, and his religion, 
and quoted some ideas and doctrines as 
advanced by him. " The influence of the 
system of Confucius is enormous. For 
twenty-three centuries it held sway over 
nearly a third of the human race. But its 
influence, great as it was in the past, is 
destined to wane in the near future. The 
system is not capable of expansion, since 
it lacks the high sanction and vital force 
°f Christianity. This system has brought 
the Chinese nation to a high state of civil- 
ization by developing a standard of mo- 
rality highly commendable. Viewed from 
a Christian standpoint this system is next 
to worthless. While its moral code is 
g°od, it is devoid of that God-given 
power which enables man to do unto 
others as he would have others do unto 
It has no conception of regenera- 
tion. It is a striking example of the dif- 
ference between the revealed religion of 
j*od and one of man's invention. One 
eaves man in a barbarous state ; the other 
e xalts him to a place just a little lower 
lb an the angels." 

j, Romanism — Its Mission," by Oscar 
• Good, of Progress, Pa. " Experience 



is the source from which we gain our 
knowledge with reference to important 
issues, and it may serve us, as a nation, 
equally Avell in our dealings with Roman- 
ism. Romanism, in histoiy, while in 
many respects tyrannical, nevertheless, 
served an important mission. She saved 
civilization from destruction at the hands 
of barbarians, and peasants from the 
tyranny of haught^y monarchs. She also 
contained the germs of activit}^ which 
afterwards resulted in the glorious Re- 
fomation. The question was next raised, 
what mission Romanism may still serve. 
In answer three facts were established. 
The hostility of Romanism to free institu- 
tions, her unchangableness, and the rapid 
growth of her power. As a consequence 
of these three facts, one of two things is 
certain. America must conquer Roman- 
ism or Romanism will conquer America." 
The speaker held out the hope that Amer- 
ica would conquer Romanism. " For the 
threatening attitude of that institution is 
arousing Americans from their indiffer- 
ence, and this indifference is our danger 
rather than the growth of the power of 
Romanism. Her mission was stated to be. 
in an indirect wa}-, self destruction." 

" Splendid Possibilities," by George K. 
Hartman, of Shiremanstown, Pa. "We 
live in an age of splendid possibilities. 
Progress has never been more apparent 
than during the closing 3-ears of the 19th 
century. The prospects for the future are 
most promising. The use of steam gave 
an impetus to inter-communication of 
every sort and was the beginning of a new 
life in the world, To-da}^ the influence of" 
that silent but mighty force — electricity — 
is felt in every department of life. In 
short this might}^ force carries light, con- 
venience and progress to every home, 
state and nation that bids it welcome. In- 
tellectual progress is manifested in the im- 
proved educational system. The import- 
ance of physical education is receiving at- 
tention. Education extended to all classes. 
Brute force giving way to arbitration. 
The dissemination of knowledge carries 
with it religious privileges. Education 
and Christianity are close companions. 
Unity of church is gaining ; sectarian walls 
are breaking cown. Men of worth, men 
of valor and men of personal integrity are 
wanted on every side. The future will see 
men who have more enthusiasm for hu- 
manity and give more individual service to 
hasten the coming of the kingdom. Then 



90 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



each one will realize unless God be for us, 
all labor is in vain and the law of Christ 
will be the law of nations." 

" Equal Rights," by Samuel P. Huber, 
of Chambersburg, Pa. "We American peo- 
ple generally see things in an inverse ratio. 
The farther they are removed from us the 
better do we understand them. We are 
thrilled with horror at the treatment 
which foreign nations receive at the hands 
of their rulers. Our hearts grow in sym- 
pathy with laboring classes of the Irish 
people. The crimes of former generations 
appal us. It is the same to-da}^. It is only 
when it comes to our door that we fail to 
understand iniquity, unjust legislation and 
cruel oppression. The evolution of rights 
of woman has placed her beside her brother 
a disfranchised citizen. Every step taken 
has been hotly contested. The question of 
equal rights is to-day not only a political, 
but also a social, moral and religious ques- 
tion. Women ought to have the same 
right of suffrage that men have. The 
moment woman has that power our great 
evils will pass into history. Taxing women 
is unjust, because they are not represen- 
ted. Taxation without representation 
caused our Revolutionary War. Let us 
count the mother's vote, that corner-stone 
which the national builders have rejected. 
Let us follow that Wyoming Star of the 
West for woman's advancement and jour- 
ney toward the goal of woman's ballot, 
which shall redeem our Nation from the 
enormous curses which seem destined to 
ruin it." 

" Educational Reform," by George A. 
L. Kindt, of Annville, Pa. " Education is 
the foundation. Men should therefore be 
educated as well and quickly as possible. 
This has not been the case, nor is it now. 
In the Middle Ages memory alone was cul- 
tivated; application of principles was neg- 
lected. Reform became necessary for the 
advancement of civilization. The princi- 
pal reformers were Comenius, Pestalozzi 
and Froebel. They held that lessons 
should be made easy by illustrations, and 
if the pupils do not learn it is the teach- 
ers' fault. Our teachers are not trained 
properly. We follow the methods of the 
Renaissence too closely. A man cannot 
teach unless he knows something about 
the nature of the mind he wishes to teach. 
There are now schools for pedagogy and 
there are better times coming for our 
pupils. The Kindergarten system should 
be introduced into all our schools where 



there are children under 10 years of age. 
Education must be made a science and must 
be recognized as such ; until that time 
civilization will be hampered in its march 
and men will not be what they should be." 

"Loyalty to Self," by Miss Maggie 
Strickler, of Lebanon. " Everything ex- 
ists for a definite purpose. When the 
earth is considered a definite character, 
purpose and structure is revealed. This 
structure is obtained by obedience to 
definite natural plans and forces which 
have governed its past history and brought 
it to its present shape. While we see 
beauty and symmetry in the structure and 
mechanism of the world, the highest type 
of it is realized in man, who alone is cre- 
ated " in the likeness of his Creator," 
thus making him subject to divine com- 
mands as well as phj-sical laws. Man is 
so placed in the world that one is de- 
pendent on the other and exerts an influ- 
ence over ever} r other with whom he comes 
in contact. His influence is felt as a 
power prompting good and putting down 
evil in every sphere and condition in life. 
The home is the most extended field of use- 
fulness. Here is the manhood and woman- 
hood of the future generation trained, and 
the orators, statesmen, politicians and 
thinkers produced and the destiny of the 
future shaped. A father and mother who 
have striven to develop their faculties and 
are loyal to them will awaken in the mind 
of the child the idea of love and perfect 
goodness. With such citizens party dis- 
tinctions will vanish and the best man in 
office. There will be no necessity then to 
call into the political arena, woman, whose 
sphere is peculiar to herself. In the 
social world is also felt the influence of 
the truly great man, refined in feeling) 
pure in heart, gentle in manner, of noble 
and exalted mind, self-sacrificing in spirit ; 
they are the living monuments of Him 
who is the model of all human perfection. 

" Our Republic," by W. H. Kreider, o 
Annville. " The history of the civilized 
world presents every nation with the ex- 
ception of the United States in the var- 
ious shades of advancement from the rude 
forms of barbarism to the full dawn of 
civilization. No such gradation existed 
in the United States." He traced our 
history from our English ancestors, 
through the various stages to the inde- 
pendence of the colonies, the Constitution, 
the war with England, the Mexican war 
and the late Rebellion. Our growth since 




THE COLLEGE FOR U3L 



91 



was phenomenal. " Although the Civil 
War placed our country upon such a basis 
a s was intended by the founders of our 
Republic, yet to-day there are dangers 
hovering about which we dare not pass 
by unheeded, and among the the foremost 
is Catholicism, which long ago would have 
hurled our public schools into a mire of 
ignorance and superstition had it not been 
for the antagonistic forces of Protestant 
organization. The dangers of trusts and 
anarchy can only be solved by filling our 
legislative halls with statesmenlike men. 
However, amid all the dangers which con- 
front our Republic, it will continue to 
stand while " empires drop and monarchs 
sink to rest;" it is destined to move on- 
ward and upward under the emblem of 
liberty — the star spangled banner. As 
time brings upon us the closing scenes of 
the nineteenth century, we may look into 
our national firmament beholding naught 
but stars of ever brightening light and 
lustre, joyously awaiting the dawn of the 
twentieth century. Then every American 
may well exclaim : " There stands the 
past ! All hail the hereafter ! Ring out 
the old ! Ring in the new !" 

"The Destiny of the English Language," 
by James F. Zug, of Lebanon, Pa. Lan- 
guage is the child of circumstances. The 
history of a people constitutes the history 
of the language. One should study the 
origin, structure and history of the En- 
glish people. The English language is the 
most copious of all tongues. The origin 
of the language is the Saxon, also words 
made up of Greek, Latin, etc. Birth-place 
of our language, its spread, and prediction 
of its universality. The flexibility and its 
^simulating powers. It is the keystone 
ln the arch of commerce. England and 
America are the leading influence in the 
sphere of commerce and industry. Their 
Possessions are world-wide. its most 
marked quality is the fact that it is the lan- 
guage of Christianity. Spread of the Eng- 
hsh missionaries plant their language and 
customs in foreign lands, thus bringing the 
pendancy of the language to a climax, 
^jnce it is the language of commerce, civ- 
"ization, etc., and because Christianity 
^cognizes it as her defender, the English 
^uguage beyond any tongue ever used by 
an is destined to become the cosmopoli- 



tan 



speech. 



The degree of A. B. on David S. Eshle- 
man, Oscar E. Good, Geo. K. Hartman, 
Samuel F. Huber, Geo. A. L. Kindt, Will- 
iam H. Kreider, Miss Maggie Strickler, 
James F. Zug. The degree of A. M. on 
J. R. Wright, '76, Newton, N. J., and H. 
U. Roop, '92, Shippensburg, Pa. The de- 
gree of D. D. on J. G. Johnson, "76, Port 
Richmond, N. Y., and S. D. Faust, ' 89, 
Daj'ton, Ohio. 



Board of Trustees. 



Th 



CONFERRING OF 

e degree of B. 



DEGREES. 

ti T ~~ UJL *>• S. was conferred on 

Lenich Meyer and Miss Anna Wilson. 



The Trustees of the College met in 
annual session on Tuesday morning, June 
12, 1894, at 9 o'clock. The Rev. H. B. 
Dohner, of Philadelphia, led the devo- 
tional exercises. The following members 
were present, viz : H. H. Kreider, Wm. H. 
Uhler, N. B. Light, Andrew H. Rice, Reno 
S. Harp, D. W. Crider, I. H. Albright, S. 
W. Clippinger, A. R. Forne}<, Isaac B. 
Haak, J. B. Stehman, H. B. Dohner, Daniel 
Eberlv, S. F. Engle, C. J. Kephart and J. 
E. Font. D. W. Cricler, Esq., of York, 
Pa., was elected President; Rev. H. B. 
Dohner, Vice President, and Rev. Dr. 
Albright, Secretary. 

The following committees were ap- 
pointed by the President : 

Endowment— Messrs. Rice, Light, Harp, 
Uhler and Engle. 

Faculty — Messrs. Kreider, Albright, 
Eberly, Fout and Kephart. 

Library and Apparatus— Messrs. Deaner, 
McDermad, Dohner, Lehman and Shott. 

Finance — Messrs. Clippinger, Kreider, 
Haak and Crider. 

Grounds and Buildings — Messrs. For- 
ney, Uhler and Stehman. 

Auditing — Messrs. Rice, Deaner and 
Engle. 

The minutes of the Executive Commit- 
tee of the past year were read and ap- 
proved. 

H. H. Kreider, the Treasurer of the 
College, made the following report which 
was approved : 

RECEIPT*. 

Boarding, Tuition, etc $8,753.29 

Interest on Dodge Fund 510.00 

$9,263.29 

PAID OUT. 

Order No. 801 to 1007, and two checks $9,263.29 
The College Agent, Rev. M. J. Mumma, 
made the following financial report, which 
was approved : 



92 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Secured on notes and in cash from 
Nov. 1, 1893, to June 1, 1894, the 

sum of $1,216.00 

Applied to Salary 350.00 

Traveling Expenses 28.00 

The Financial Agent presented the fol- 
lowing report for the past year, which was 
also adopted : 

INCOME. 



Boarding and Tuition $5,073.80 

Music, etc 811.82 

Art 3 6 ;40 

College Day 216.25 

Endowment Interest 695.00 

Room Rent 15.00 

Post Graduate 5.00 

Rent for House 12o!oO 

Donations, etc 556.61 

Old Accounts 100.00 



Total $7,629.88 

PAID OCT. 

Domestic Department $2,147.80 

Teachers' Salaries 3,395.00 

Insurance 131.95 

College Association 10.00 

Janitor's Services H6 00 

Repairs 137.65 

Steward's Salary 170.00 

Traveling Expenses 56.98 

Advertising 16.25 

Expressage, Postage, etc 7.67 

Interest and Discount s 1,254.66 

Old Account , ' 92.00 

Chemical Supply 19^58 

Agent's Salary \\ 27.59 

Catalogues for '93 . ' 46.75 



Total $7,629.88 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Isaac B. Haak, 
Financial Agent. 

The Librarian, Professor Deaner, made 
the following report, which was adopted : 

Number of volumes in the Library 
June, 1893, 3,200; number added during 
the year, 100 ; total, 3,300 at this time. 
The library needs better quarters to sup- 
ply the demands of its patrons. 

President Bierman presented his annual 
report, in which he suggested a number of 
needed improvements in the various de- 
partments of the College, urged the great 
need of devising some plan to relieve the 
institution of its indebtedness and took a 
hopeful view of the future. 

One hundred and sixteen students were 
enrolled during the year. The teaching 
force was efficient and entire harmony 
prevails 

The following ladies and gentlemen 
were recommended for graduation : 

In Music— Misses Ida L. Bowman, 



Mellie Fortenbaugh, Emily E. Loose 
Ella Pennypacker and Mabel W. Saylor. ' 

Bachelor of Science. — Mr. H. Leuich 
Meyer and Miss Anna E. Wilson. 

Bachelor of Arts Messrs. David S. 

Eshleman, Oscar Ellis Good, Geo. k! 
Hartman, Samuel F. Huber, George A. 2 
Kindt, William H. Kreider, James F. Zug 
and Miss Maggie Strickler. 

Master of Arts. — Rev. John R. 
Wright, Class of '76, in cursu, and Prof. 
Hervin U. Roop, Class of '92, on examine 
tion. 

For the honorary degree of Doctor op 
Divinity : 

Rev. J. George Johnston, A. M., Ph. 
D., Class of '76, Port Richmond, X. Y, 
and Rev. Samuel D. Faust, A. M., CLasa 
of '89, Dayton, Ohio. 

The reports were received and the 
recommendations adopted. 

The Committee on Faculty submitted 
the following report, which after some dis- 
cussion w r as adopted : 

First. We recommend that hereafter 
the policy of this institution in relation 
to the election of members of the Faculty 
be as follows : Any member of the Faculty 
having served in any one chair during 
three successive years shall, when re- 
elected to such position, be considered as 
elected permanently ; that is during good 
behavior, or while he or she gives satisfac- 
tion in that department. Provided, that 
any professor permanently elected shall, 
if he desires to retire from the Faculty, 
give notice of such wish to the Executive 
Committee at least three months previous 
to the annual meeting of the Board of 
Trustees, and in case of dissatisfaction 
with any professor, the Board, through 
the Executive Committee, shall give suc% 
person similar notice. 

Second. We recommend the reelection 
of President Bierman and Professors 
Deaner, Lehman and McDermad, to their 
respective positions permanently under 
the above regulation. 

Third We recommend the reelection 
of Professor Shott and Miss Flint. 

Fourth. We recommend the election of 
Miss Anna M. Thompson, B. Ph., to the 
position of Preceptress and Professor of 
Modern Language and Literature, in place 
of Miss Sleichter, resigned. 

Fifth. We recommend that the salaries 
remain the same as last year. 

The Committee on Endowment made a 
report in which they urged upon all i" tel * 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



93 



ested the speedy enlargement of the fund 
to $100,000. 

The Secretary was instructed to write 
to the Presiding Elders of the Co-opera- 
tins; Conferences to bring their matter be- 
fore oar people. 

The Committee on Library and Appa- 
ratus made a report in which the enlarge- 
ment of library space and the purchase of 
additional apparatus was recommended, 
which was adopted. 

The Committee on Grounds and Build- 
ings made a report which was adopted, and 
the following Committee was appointed 
to improve the campus, viz. : Profs. Shott, 
Beaner and Lehman, I. H. Albright and 
President Bierman. 

The Committee on Finance made the 
following report, which after a full discus- 
sion was adopted : 

Recognizing the important necessity of 
immediate financial relief to our College, 
we recommend that a committee of five be 
appointed, including Bishop Kephart and 
D. W. Crider,the President of the Board, 
the other three men to be appointed by 
the Executive Committee, with the advice 
and consent of Bishop Kephart and D. 
W. Crider, which committee shall at an 
early day consider and ascertain what can 
he done to relieve the College of its in- 
debtedness and make a determined effort 
to secure the needed contributions be- 
tween now and the Commencement week 
of 1895. 

Resolved , That the members of this 
Board hereby pledge themselves to sup- 
port and encourage this committee in all 
its efforts. 

Resolved, That a persistent and active 
agent be continued in the field. 

The Auditing Committee reported hav- 
ing audited all the accounts of the College 
officers, and having found them correctly 
kept, the report was adopted. 

The following resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That we gratefully accept the 
donation of $300 by the late Levi S. Reist, 
a nd that the President and Treasurer of 
this Board be authorized to receive and 
^ u ly acknowledge the same in proper 
lorm. 

Henry H. Kreider was reelected Treas- 
urer of the College. 

Jolin H. Maulfair was reelected Stew- 
ard. 



the 



On 



Kreider and Uhler. Ex-ofticio member, 
President Bierman. 

On motion, the Executive Committee 
was instructed to secure a teacher for the 
Art Department. 

On motion, the following resolution 
was adopted : 

Resolved, That we hereby recognize 
and appreciate the interest shown by the 
members of the Faculty and the faithful 
work done by them during the past year, 
and express our gratitude for the same. 

The Board adjourned sine die on Wed- 
nesday aftrenoon. Harmon}^ prevailed 
throughout its sessions. 



The Reception. 

On Saturday evening, June 9, a de- 
lightful reception was tendered the faculty 
and students of the College by President 
and Mrs. Bierman, in honor of the 
Senior class. The guests were received 
by the host and hostess, who first intro- 
duced them to the Rev. Dr. Funkhouser, 
of Dayton, Ohio, and then to the Class of 
'94, who sat awaiting introduction, in an 
adjoining room. 

The evening was spent very pleasantly 
in friendly intercourse. Exquisite re- 
freshments were served, thus providing 
for the wants of the inner man. 

About eleven o'clock the guests retired 
with feelings of gratitude to our esteemed 
President and wife for the pleasant even- 
ing which they were permitted to spend 
in their hospitable home. 



niotion,the Executive Committee of 



Albri 



past year was reelected, viz. : Messrs. 



ght, Haak, Rice, Forney, Flook, 



Kalozetean Literary Society. 

Raima non sine pulvere. 

Societ} r work has been progressing. 
Boys have been encouraged in their work 
by the large number of visitors who lately 
visited us. 

The Clionians attended our session a 
few weeks ago in a body and gave us flat- 
tering remarks. Messrs. Good and Hart- 
man were also with us the same evening. 

The Society also accepted an invitation 
to attend their Society June 8th. A 
pleasant and entertaining programme was 
listened to. 

Messrs. L. Enders and H. Enders join- 
ed our Society, and we expect to welcome 
more to our ranks till another year. 

Prof. W. H. Kindt, Rev. U. S. G. Renn, 
Chas. Pennypacker and Elmer Haak, were 
with us during the last da}^s of school. 



94 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



School has closed. One member will 
leave society work; the remainder expect 
to attend College next year. We have every 
reason to believe, that with all our trials 
and small number, we have derived much 
benefit and have become stronger in ap- 
pearing before an audience. The mem- 
bers are satisfied with the year's work 
and with regret have parted. We have 
become more proficient in literary ability, 
and it is our hope that we may always 
have our motto in our thoughts when in 
the position of a speaker. 

The editor would ask each member to 
feel as if he were responsible for the 
work performed, that they would take 
more interest in building up and in seeing 
to all that pertains to the good of the 
Society. 

We wish a happy vacation to all stu- 
dents. 



Philokosmian Literary Society. 



Esse Quam Videri. 

Another year of our existence as a so- 
ciet}^ has rolled away and will be known 
only to history. 

Our progress during the j r ear has been 
gratifjdng in maivy respects. Besides the 
remarkable interest manifested in the lit- 
erary programs during the year, and the 
progress made by the members from a lit- 
erary standpoint, we have made some im- 
portant changes in the method of conduct- 
ing our literary as well as our business 
exercises. These changes have been pro- 
ductive of good results during the short 
time that they have been tried, and we be- 
lieve that they shall continue to be so. 
As the College j-ear neared its close we 
enjoyed several very pleasant sessions. 
On the evening of June 1 we had the 
privilege of entertaining the members of 
the Class of '94. Mr. G. K. Hartman, the 
presiding officer of the class, in a few 
words expressed the pleasure it afforded 
the class to be present, their high appre- 
ciation of the exercises, and closed by 
thanking the society for the entertain- 
ment which they had so kindly provided. 
Messrs. Van Allen, Buddinger and Keller 
were also present on this occasion. 

On the following Friday evening we 
were invited to attend the exercises of the 
Clionian Literary Societ}\ To say that 
we enjoyed the exercises would be ex- 
pressing our appreciation in very moder- 



ate terms. Onty two things marred the 
pleasure of the occasion. 

One was that all of us were called upon 
for speeches, the other, the thought that 
for some of us, it was the last time that 
we should meet, as students, in any of the 
literary societies of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege. 

The project of building a new Philo- 
kosmian hall has been revived. Messrs, 
W. H. Kreider and I. E. Albert were 
chosen by the Society as agents to can- 
vass our ex-members and friends in order 
to secure the necessary funds for the pur- 
pose. Other steps have also been taken 
in this direction, and we hope, if possible, 
to erect a structure that will answer the 
needs of the Society and that will be help- 
ful to the institution as well. 

We were pleased to note the goodly 
number of ex-Philos who showed their 
interest in the Society and the College by 
their presence during Commencement 
week. And now the work of the present 
editor in this department is done. With 
pleasure he introduces to the readers of 
The College Forum the new editor, W. 
E. Heilman,who will represent the Society 
during the next College year. We feel 
positive that Mr. Heilman will find will- 
ing readers among the ex-Philos, and es- 
pecially among those who have recently 
been added to the list of ex-members, and 
we are confident that he will spare no 
pains to record all matters of interest to 
Philokosmians ; and thus he will con- 
tribute his share toward the continuance 
of that characteristic Philo brotherhood 
and of the determination to be rather 
than to seem to be. 



Among the Exchanges. 

The editor's number of the Chels® 
Beacon is Yery creditable and deserving 
of the highest praise. This paper is one 
of the leaders in school journalism. 

Johns Hopkins University issues eleven 
periodicals from its own press. 

The third number of the High School 
Authentic is an evidence that this young 
journal is in a thriving condition. 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SUEGEOtfS. 

OPPO. COOK COUNTY HOSPITAL. CHICAGO, U- L - j| 

The Winter Term begins September, 1894, and ends APf ' 
1895. Total fees §105 each Winter Term, and a lahorawjj 
deposit which is returnable. Four annual graded coi«; 
with advanced standing for graduates in Pharmacy "'"Line, 
vorsity preparatory courses prior to the study ot M<*« u 
Clinical and laboratory facilities unsurpassed. 
For annual circular of information, apply to 

W. E. QUINK, M Dm 

Pres. of the Fac' llly ' gT 
813 WEST HARRI S ° N 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



95 



c 



UMBERLAND VALLEY RAILROAD. 
TIMETABLE— Oct. 1, 1893. 



Down Trains. 



Lv. Winchester 

" Martinsburg . ... 

' Hagerstown 

» Greencastle 

" Chambersburg . 

" Shippensburg 

" Newville 

" Carlisle 

" Mechanicsburg.. 
Ar. Dillsburg 

" Harrisburg 



C'bg 
Acc. 



6 10 
6 32 

6 53 

7 18 
7 42 



Philadelphia.. 

New York 

Baltimore 



8 03 

11 25 
2 03 
11 15 I 
A. M. I 



Ky'e 


Mr'g 


Day 


Ev'g 


N'gt 


Exp 


Mail 


Exp 


Mail 


Exp 


No. 2 


No. 4 


No. 6 


No. 8 


No.10 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


6 15 






2 30 


3 20 


7 00 






3 20 


4 50 


7 40 


830 


11 25 


4 10 


7 10 


8 09 




11 48 


4 36 


736 


8 30 


9 05 


12 08 


5 00 


8 00 


8 55 




12 30 


5 30 


8 16 


9 15 




12 50 


5 51 


8 53 


9 40 


'"956 


1 15 


617 


920 


10 04 




1 40 


6 43 


9 43 


10 25 


10 30 


2 00 


7 05 


10 05 










A. M. 


1 25 


125 


6 50 


11 15 


4 30 


4 03 


4 03 


9 38 


3 50 


7 33 


3 10 


310 


6 45 


10 40 


6 20 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


AM. 



Additional trains will leave Carlisle daily except Sunday at 
5:55 a. m., 7:68 a. m., 3:40 p. m., stopping at all intermediate 
stations, arriving at Harrisburg at 6:40 a. m., 8:03 a. m., 4:30 
p. m. 

Evening Mail runs daily between Harrisburg and Cham 
bersburg. 



Up Trains. 


Win 
Acc. 


Me's 
Exp 


Hag 
Acc. 


Ev'g 
Mail 


C'bg 
Acc. 


N. O. 
Exp- 




No. 1 


No. 3 


No. 5 


No. 7 


No 


.17 


No. 9 




P. M. 


A. 


M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


p. 


M. 


P. M. 




11 40 


4 


45 


8 53 


11 20 


2 


15 


4 23 




8 00 


VI 


15 




9 00 


2 


00 


2 06 


" Philadelphia 


11 20 


4 


30 


8 50 


11 50 


2 


20 


4 30 




A. M. 


A. 


M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. 


M. 


P. M. 




4 40 


7 


53 


12 40 


340 


5 


20 


8 00 




















" Mechanicsburg 


5 03 


8 


13 


1 03 


4 01 


5 


41 


820 




5 30 


8 


36 


129 


4 25 


6 


Ik", 


8 44 


" Newville 


555 


9 


00 


1 52 


4 55 


6 


36 


9 08 




6 15 


9 


21 


213 


5 10 


6 


57 


9 29 




6 40 


9 


43 


2 35 


5 35 


7 


20 


9 50 


" Greencastle 


7 02 


ID 


114 


3 01 


5 50 






10 12 




7 25 
9 30 
11 00 
A. M. 


10 27 

11 12 

12 00 
A. M. 


325 


6 18 

7 02 
7 50 

P. M. 




10 35 

A. M. 


" Martinsburg 


r. 


It. 


Ar. Winchester 






P. M. 



Additional trains will leave Harrisburg daily except Sunday 
?i»n 35 a " m " 10:45 p - m - arrivin S at Carlisle at 11:20 a. m., 
JWOp. m., stopping at all intermediate stations ; additional 
nam will leave Hagerstown at 8:00 a. m., arriving at 11:00 

p st0 PP>ng at all intermediate stations. 

.Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars between Hagerstown and New 
x ork on Keystone Express and Night Express east, and on 

P m ,P nis Express and New Orleans Express west. 

Pullman Sleeping Cars on Night Express and New Orleans 
f^xpress between Philadelphia an d New Orleans. 

PZ 0U wisn t0 advertise anything anywhere at any time, 
Xew Yo e r k° GE °* P * R0WELL & C°-> No- 10 Spruce Street, 

EVERY one in need of information on the subject of ad- 
vertising will do well to obtain a copy of "Book for 
naii sers ' 1 ' ;i,;s P il f?e>S price one dollar. Mailed, postage 
thi A 0n recei Pt of price. Contains a careful compilation from 
American Newspaper Directory of all the best papers 
J[JJ class journals; gives the circulation rating of every one, 
"u a good deal of information about rates and other matters 
m i ,i lln ? to tne business of advertising. Address ROW 
York -^DVERTISINU BUREAU, 10 Spruce Street, Ne< 



New 



Rensselaer 



/^PolytechnicV% 

*4r 



Ijpcal 



Institute, 
Troy, N.Y. 

examinations provided for. Send for a Catalogue. 



David beandt, 

B 0OT • AND • SHOEMAKER. 

ANNVIIXE, PENNA. 

^STUDENTS' WORK A SPECIALTY. 



W. F. BECKER. 



J. P. BKUGGER. 



THE 

Kastern Book Store, 

315 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
BOOKS AJ\D STATIONERY. 

Special Rates to Students. 

$W Second-Hand School Books a Specialty. 

WRITE F OK PRICES. 

H. A. LOSER, 

GROCERIES ABB CONFECTIONERY, 

OYSTERS AND ICE CKEAM, 

ANNVILLE, IPA. 

g B. MARSHALL, M. D., 

No, 34 East Main Street, 

ANNVILLE. PA 

ISAAC MANN & SON, 

LARGEST CLOTHIERS, 

834 Cumberland Street, 

LEBANON, ~E*A. 

THE BEST GOODS FOR THE LEAST MONEY. 



J, 



R. McCATJLY, 



DAILY MEAT MARKET. 

GOOD MEAT. LOW PRICES. ANNVILLE, FA.. 



J 



OHN TRUMP, 
BOOT AND SHOE MAKER, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



WS. SEABOLD, 
. DEALER IN 

Drugs, Medicines, Perfumery and Toilet Articles, 



No. 2 East Main St., Annville, Pa. 




CAN I OBTAIN A PATENT? For a 

Srompt answer and an honest oninion, write to 
1UNN & CO., who have had nearly fifty years* 
experience in the patent business. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. A Handbook of In- 
formation concerning Pa tents and bow to ob- 
tain them sent free. Also a catalogue of mechan- 
ical and scientific books sent free. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice in the Scientific American, and 
thus are brought widely before the public with- 
out cost to the inventor. This splendid paper 
issued weekly, elegantly illustrated, has by ten 
largest circulation of any scientific work in the 
world. 93 a year, sample copies sent free. 

Building Edition, monthly, $2.50 a vear. Single 
copies, 'Z-i cents. Every number contains beau- 
tiful plates, in colore, and photographs of new 
houses, with plans, enabling builders to show the 
latest designs anil secure contracts. Address 
MUNN & CO., New Yoke;. 3«l BkoadwAT. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



^yiLLIAM KIBBLER, 

SHAVING AND HAIR DRESSING, 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop, Annville, Pa. 



A 



DAM B. HESS, 

OFFICE AT THE HOTEL EAGLE 
OMNIBUS TO ALL TRAINS. 

ANNVILLE. PA. 

JACOB SARGENT, 
FASHIONABLE TAILOR, 

18 and 20 Main St., Annville, Pa. 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, GRO- 
CERIES, BOOTS and SHOES, 

— AND— 

GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS. 

J". JS- SHOFE, 

ANNVILLE, PA 

SNOW FLAKE PRINTING HOUSE, 
A. C. M. HEISTER, Prop., 
FINE JOB PRINTING, 

35 S. White Oak Street - - Annville, Pa. 

WILLIAM WALTZ, 
FASHIONABLE 
HAIR CUTTING AND SHAVING SALOON, 

West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
H. H. KREIDEK. JA'O. E. HERB. 

KREIDER & CO., 
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

Hard & Soft Coal, Grain, Seeds Salt & Feed. 

Office : Railroad Street, near Depot, 
Telephone Connection. ANNVILLE, PA. 



^HE BEST 



STOCK, THE 
PRICES IN 



LOWEST 



FURNITURE, 



Joseph Miller's, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



HUE. IT. SHAUD, 

DEALER IN 

Gold Watches and Jewelry, 

"Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYS. 
TERS AND CREAM. ANNVILLE, PA. 

S. M. SHENK S BAKERY, 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

PRESH BREAD. CAKES AND ROLLS, 

One Door West Penn'a House, Annville. 
-»>>■ Headquarters For -<<-- — 

GROCERIES, CONFECTIONERIES 

OYSTERS, FRUITS AND NUTS. 
Restaurant Attached. Meals at All Hours. 

12 West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



II you want to Buy a Hat iiEM, and a right Hat, or anything 
Men's Furnishings, 

GO TO 

Successors to RAITT &. CO., 
Eighth and Cumber/and Sts., Lebanon, Pi 

Kinpor ts & Sihenk 

ANNVILLE, PA., 

Dealers in Dry Goods, Notions 

and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home-made, 
Ingrain and Brussels Carpets. You buy Cheaper 
from us than away from home, and have a large 
stock to select from. 

THE 



U. B. MUTUAL AID 80CIET! 

OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

HOME OFFICE, LEBANON, PENNA. 

Chartered by the State Legislature, March 11, 1869. 
Positive amounts guaranteed and claims paid in 
full. 

Benefits of $1000 insurance secured for $8.C0. 
Reciprocal Circle Insurance,new and very popular. 

Invested Assets $146,809.31 

Contingent Assets 116,970.W 

Assessment Basis 5,295,O00.W 

Death Losses Paid 6,774,123.01. 

THE PLAN. 

The payment of EIGHT DOLLARS on application, 
FIVE DOLLARS annually for four years, and there- 
after TWO DOLLARS annually during life, wit» 
pro rata mortality assessments for each death ot & 
member insured for $1000, is as follows: 



Age. 


Ass't 


Age. 


Ass'mt 


Age. 


Ass'mt 


20 


65 


30 


75 


40 


90 


21 


66 


31 


77 


41 


9J 


22 


67 


32 


79 


42 


94 


23 


68 


33 


81 


43 


96 


24 


69 


34 


83 


44 


98 


25 


70 


35 


85 


45 


1 01) 


26 


71 


36 


86 


46 


1 06 


27 


72 


37 


87 


47 


1 12 


28 


73 


38 


88 


48 


1 18 


29 


74 


39 


89 


49 


1 24 



1 30 
1 40 
1 50 
1 60 
1 70 
1 80 
1 92 



This will entitle a member to a certificate of i 
to be paid after death to the legal beneficiary, ^' ae 
ever such death may occur. 

Reliable Agents Wanted Everywhere. 



F. W. FROST, 
BOOK BINDER AND BLANK BOOK 
MANUFACTURER, 

783 Cumberland St., - - Lebanon, P a<